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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We would like to buy a couple 8 1/4 saw blades for new Dewalt 7485 table saw. I have been looking at several brands and see that many use the Diablo's in most Youtube video's.
I read the riving knife is .063 thick and the kerf on the blade must be bigger than the knife.
I would prefer to go with recommended blades for the Dewalt just for the price difference, although I would certainly spend a little more on the Diablo if they last a bit longer and make cleaner cuts.
This saw came a 24 tooth blade. We read that the factory blade will not be the greatest and a 40 tooth is more a combination blade for just about everything else.
We would like to get a 40 tooth and possibly a 60 tooth to have on hand for the different uses making cleaner cuts.
Our plan is to make some bookcase type shelves, corner cabinets, along with a wall unit in the future.
We are thinking about making all these things out of pine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Looking at the diablo 8 1/4 inch 40 tooth blade on home depo's site, Model # D0840X I see this under the reviews.

· 2 years ago
Will this be safe to use on Dewalt's DWE7485? Blade thickness is the same size as the riving knif...
Will this be safe to use on Dewalt's DWE7485?
Blade thickness is the same size as the riving knife, .063".
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homedepot.com

Originally posted on homedepot.com
  1. ADR58
    · a year ago

    I have this saw and am going to buy this blade.
    The manual states...
    "The riving knife provided with this saw is marked as follows: 0.087" (2.2mm) thick riving knife. Only for use with 8 1/4" (210mm) blade with 0.094" (2.4mm) min kerf width and 0.079" (2.0mm) max body thickness"
    So, the riving knife is 0.087" thick, not 0.063". Both the guard splitter and the riving knife do actually state the above on them. With this blade's kerf at 0.094" and body thickness of 0.063" (< 0.079" max), the blade is within the table saw specs.
★★★★★★★★★★3 out of 5 stars.
James
· 10 months ago
not compatible with DWE7485
I am sure this is a great blade, I always see Diablo blades used on youtube videos and figured I would use one on my saw. However, the instructions specify not to exceed 0.063" and this is too thick.
Tried looking online to see if there are wider riving knives but have not found anything.
Too bad.



We do realize, this post is now at least 2 years old and the other 10 months old. We figured our DWE7485 would be the same. Not looking at this thou. We just bought this saw a couple weeks ago and not really sure what extra blades to buy now
In the manual I have, it reads the riving knife is 1.6mm which would be .063 no ?
Yeah, I will say it. We are really confused on what blades to buy now if there are no wider riving knives to use with different sized blades on this model saw.
 

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We would like to buy a couple 8 1/4 saw blades for new Dewalt 7485 table saw. I have been looking at several brands and see that many use the Diablo's in most Youtube video's.
I read the riving knife is .063 thick and the kerf on the blade must be bigger than the knife.
I would prefer to go with recommended blades for the Dewalt just for the price difference, although I would certainly spend a little more on the Diablo if they last a bit longer and make cleaner cuts.
This saw came a 24 tooth blade. We read that the factory blade will not be the greatest and a 40 tooth is more a combination blade for just about everything else.
We would like to get a 40 tooth and possibly a 60 tooth to have on hand for the different uses making cleaner cuts.
Our plan is to make some bookcase type shelves, corner cabinets, along with a wall unit in the future.
We are thinking about making all these things out of pine.
24T is a rip blade, keep it for exactly that purpose. Plus, rip blades typically are FTG (flat top grind) and leave a perfectly flat groove. Great for cutting dados or box joints, if you don’t have or can’t have a dedicated dado stack. For crosscuts you’d want a 40T, these are readily sold at Lowe’s, Woodcraft, Overstock, Amazon etc. Also don’t forget that you can mount a smaller diameter blade such as 7 1/4” which is both more common and cheaper, just make sure that your saw’s arbor can take it.

If you’re worried about the riving knife and don’t want to take it off, make a zero clearance insert with a custom thickness splitter. Alternatively you can buy a set of splitters from someone like Microjig.


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I wouldn't get too hung up on your first blade. Whatever came with your saw will last you a good long time unless you hit some nails with it. You will do mainly ripping with a table saw and a 24-tooth blade will stay cooler. A 60 tooth blade isn't necessary and will not rip solid lumber that well. As for the riving knife (and the blade guard) they are the first thing to be removed on a saw. I'm not saying that it's good to remove them but they get in the way so that is why they are removed.
 

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We would like to buy a couple 8 1/4 saw blades for new Dewalt 7485 table saw. I have been looking at several brands and see that many use the Diablo's in most Youtube video's.
I read the riving knife is .063 thick and the kerf on the blade must be bigger than the knife.
I would prefer to go with recommended blades for the Dewalt just for the price difference, although I would certainly spend a little more on the Diablo if they last a bit longer and make cleaner cuts.
This saw came a 24 tooth blade. We read that the factory blade will not be the greatest and a 40 tooth is more a combination blade for just about everything else.
We would like to get a 40 tooth and possibly a 60 tooth to have on hand for the different uses making cleaner cuts.
Our plan is to make some bookcase type shelves, corner cabinets, along with a wall unit in the future.
We are thinking about making all these things out of pine.
The Diablo blades, at least the 7-14" ones I use create a kerf of 1/16" or 0.0625" close enough to .063 to not make a difference for you. I use Diablo 7-1/4" 60 tooth blades in my table saw a lot. They are beautiful blades for cross cutting anything up to 1-1/2" thick. They are cheaper to use and throw away than having my 10" blades sharpened. I also use them for cutting expensive wood like ebony because the thin kerf doesn't waste much. For general use a combination blade is OK and your 24 tooth 8-1/4" blade is about equivalent to a 30 tooth 10" blade which would be considered a ripping blade. I like most DeWalt tools, I have a lot of them, but I think Freud Diablo blades are better than DeWalt's. If you want the very best blades I recommend Forest but they are pricey.
 

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We would like to buy a couple 8 1/4 saw blades for new Dewalt 7485 table saw. I have been looking at several brands and see that many use the Diablo's in most Youtube video's.
I read the riving knife is .063 thick and the kerf on the blade must be bigger than the knife.
I would prefer to go with recommended blades for the Dewalt just for the price difference, although I would certainly spend a little more on the Diablo if they last a bit longer and make cleaner cuts.
This saw came a 24 tooth blade. We read that the factory blade will not be the greatest and a 40 tooth is more a combination blade for just about everything else.
We would like to get a 40 tooth and possibly a 60 tooth to have on hand for the different uses making cleaner cuts.
Our plan is to make some bookcase type shelves, corner cabinets, along with a wall unit in the future.
We are thinking about making all these things out of pine.
The higher tooth count blade will give you less tear-out when doing cross-cuts (cross grain) on boards or As high as possible tooth count when cutting plywood. Rip-cuts (with grain direction) the lower tooth count will clear the saw dust quicker and less apt to leave a burn mark from the blade verses the higher tooth count blade.

Personally, I use a higher tooth count. 80 tooth count with the 10" blade. 96 tooth count with the 12" blade. I've been using primarily Bosch blades.
 
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