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I bought this Hyde drywall sander a few months ago and I think it's a better way to to sand paint. It's also made in Canada so you guys that live there will like that. It uses a screen to sand with and you can get them in different grits. You still need to use as little paint as possible because it will still clog up. With the screen you can use a pick and unclog it where with regular sand paper and disc it's trash. The hose that comes with it I use on my miter saw so for the money it's a great deal IMO.

Hyde Tools 09165 Dust-Free Drywall Vacuum Hand Sander | eBay
 

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Thanks for the info. Don what paint are you using? I've been using Rust-Oleum 2X Ultra Cover Flat Black Primer with great success. You have to have a light touch as it comes out fast. And Given time to dry sands off fairly easily. Sanding cross grain, then with the grain. I'm using just a palm sander and either using 60 or 100 grit to remove most, Then finishing up with 150 grit. I do the same with my acrylics as well.
 

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Thanks for the info. Don what paint are you using? I've been using Rust-Oleum 2X Ultra Cover Flat Black Primer with great success. You have to have a light touch as it comes out fast. And Given time to dry sands off fairly easily. Sanding cross grain, then with the grain. I'm using just a palm sander and either using 60 or 100 grit to remove most, Then finishing up with 150 grit. I do the same with my acrylics as well.
Bobby I use the same paint.
 

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I'm just a little bummed on my latest sign, I'm working on. I painted the letters by hand, so I wouldn't have to sand and sand and still get paint that soaked into the wood. These are a bit smaller letter, thus, a bit closer together, then I normally paint. And although I was very careful to not paint out of the letters, the paint still managed to soak into the wood and I have small black lines going from letter to letter. Not really bad, and can't be seen at a distance, but still bummed about it.

I know most of you sign guys/galls, spray a sealer on first, then paint. Is that sealer the same thing your clear coat finish is? I've always had that fear, if I clear coat it first, then paint the letters, the paint on the letters with eventually crack off.
 

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Sometimes & use a spray sand n sealer, sometimes I spray a clear lacquer finish on before painting. I like the lacquer because it dries pretty fast.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
I'm just a little bummed on my latest sign, I'm working on. I painted the letters by hand, so I wouldn't have to sand and sand and still get paint that soaked into the wood. These are a bit smaller letter, thus, a bit closer together, then I normally paint. And although I was very careful to not paint out of the letters, the paint still managed to soak into the wood and I have small black lines going from letter to letter. Not really bad, and can't be seen at a distance, but still bummed about it.

I know most of you sign guys/galls, spray a sealer on first, then paint. Is that sealer the same thing your clear coat finish is? I've always had that fear, if I clear coat it first, then paint the letters, the paint on the letters with eventually crack off.
I mostly use lacquer in a spray can [rattle can] that I get at Wal Mart. I buy the cheapest they have. I use lacquer because it dries fast. If you are using pine for your signs it will bleed paint easier that western cedar. Cedar is what I use. As for the paint cracking I haven't been making signs long enough to answer that question but I not hear any comments about it on this forum.
 

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I bought this Hyde drywall sander a few months ago and I think it's a better way to to sand paint. It's also made in Canada so you guys that live there will like that. It uses a screen to sand with and you can get them in different grits. You still need to use as little paint as possible because it will still clog up. With the screen you can use a pick and unclog it where with regular sand paper and disc it's trash. The hose that comes with it I use on my miter saw so for the money it's a great deal IMO.

Hyde Tools 09165 Dust-Free Drywall Vacuum Hand Sander | eBay
I have this one Don, and I really like it. Mind you, I've only used it for drywall... never thought about sanding paint with it, but it makes sense for dust collection.
 
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Lee, before you paint, try using wood conditioner, and paint after it dries. If the wood is too dry (or been in the shop for awhile), no matter how careful you are, it may soak it up. I usually use Minwax Wood Conditioner (red label) on all my wood. I screwed up my last can of it (somehow), and messed myself up but good.

I'm just a little bummed on my latest sign, I'm working on. I painted the letters by hand, so I wouldn't have to sand and sand and still get paint that soaked into the wood. These are a bit smaller letter, thus, a bit closer together, then I normally paint. And although I was very careful to not paint out of the letters, the paint still managed to soak into the wood and I have small black lines going from letter to letter. Not really bad, and can't be seen at a distance, but still bummed about it.

I know most of you sign guys/galls, spray a sealer on first, then paint. Is that sealer the same thing your clear coat finish is? I've always had that fear, if I clear coat it first, then paint the letters, the paint on the letters with eventually crack off.
 

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Barb, is that oil, water based, does it dry fast?
 

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Lee, before you paint, try using wood conditioner, and paint after it dries. If the wood is too dry (or been in the shop for awhile), no matter how careful you are, it may soak it up. I usually use Minwax Wood Conditioner (red label) on all my wood. I screwed up my last can of it (somehow), and messed myself up but good.
Barb, you talking about something like this? Before I painted my border black, I went ahead and hit it and the surrounding area with the spray lacquer. It looks like it prevented the soaking of the paint. I had read that some had did that, but I was always afraid that it would make the paint peel, being sprayed over the lacquer.
 

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Lee I really don't think your paint will peel unless it's put on to thick. If spraying lacquer or dewaxed shellac I can't think of a paint that will not stick to them. The spray shellac you see in the home centers made by Bulls Eye is dewaxed. I don't think they make a spray can using waxed shellac. If you haven't used shellac do some research on the net. I think you will really like it.
 

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I believe that is the one Barb was talking about. I have used spray lacquer 1st then applied color after and never a problem.. I learned years ago with cars enamel or other finishes on top of lacquer was Ok, but don't ever put lacquer on top of anything else unless it is a very old finish because it will wrinkle up causing a lot of extra work. The voice of experience speaking here.

Lee I really don't think your paint will peel unless it's put on to thick. If spraying lacquer or dewaxed shellac I can't think of a paint that will not stick to them. The spray shellac you see in the home centers made by Bulls Eye is dewaxed. I don't think they make a spray can using waxed shellac. If you haven't used shellac do some research on the net. I think you will really like it.
 
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