Router Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,603 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is simple and straightforward and it's easy to make. On one side you can cut bevels and maybe cut tendons. This is made out of MDF and my T track is wanting to pull out of the MDF. I put extra screws (2) in it but no luck so I use clamps.

The other side is for making splines for picture frames and boxes. I haven't tried this out yet. I cut dadoes for the bridge to fit into that attaches the the two sides. The fit on my TS fence was to tight and had to sand it and wax it. It's still a little to tight but it will wear in.





 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
I REALLY like that jig - especially adding the spline jig on the other side of the fence - NICE WORK!
Where did you get the plans for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
If you're T track is trying to pull out, have you seen the T track Lee Valley sells? I tried to post the webpage for it, but I'm new and can't post URLs yet. But, if you go to Lee Valley and search for T Track, you'll see it. I haven't used it before, but I'll probably try it pretty soon. It has a flange on the bottom to plant itself in. There's also a bit to cut the groove for the flange to slide into. Look very useful for your situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,747 Posts
It appears that Don used screws to hold the track. That's how I secure track, also. Works for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,145 Posts
Couldn't you put a strip of wood on the backside of that mdf and use screws long enough to go through the mdf and into the wood? Over time, might you also want a rib between the two sides to make sure they can't rack and get off square?
I like this jig...I might have to borrow your idea! The dual purpose aspect is a great idea and will be easier to keep track of then two separate jigs would be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,310 Posts
I agree with Ken, but you could also rough up the outer surface of your piece of T Track with some 80 grit paper, and then epoxy it into the slot, or you could use flat head bolts and nuts on the back side instead of the wood screws to attach it.

Making a dual purpose jig is a great idea, and it reduces the jig storage space needed, if you save your jigs like I do. I hang mine from my shop ceiling when they are awaiting their next use, and I'm running out of ceiling space.

I usually use my Delta Tenon Jig for this, because I can make finer position adjustments with it than I usually can when adjusting my fence. It will accept work at 45 deg angle too, although the stops for holding the work in position on it are smaller. For larger work I would most likely make a jig much like your's, but haven't needed to, yet.

Charley
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Nice job Don. I've seen a few home made tenoning jigs and they are very similar to that. The one thing I would add to use it for tenoning is a stop/fence to make sure the board stays vertical while it goes through the saw. You could use the t track to mount the stop if you want. I was going to suggest what Charley did, use flat head machine screws and nuts to hold the t track on and since you are pulling outward on it I would put a screw in every available hole to help keep it from distorting.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top