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If you put more memory on a computer does that mean you put in a new hard drive?

A good friend works on my computer when something happens to it and he doesn't want to charge me very much or not at all. That is why I am asking this question. I don't want to take advantage of our friendship.

Thanks
 

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No, memory is where the programs and data reside while the computer is on. The hard drive is storage for the programs and data when the computer is off.

That's over simplistic, but it's close enough. If your friend wants to install more memory or RAM, go for it. Most computers can benefit from all the RAM you can afford. You should increase your hard disk storage if your current one is more than 70% full, or if you anticipate loading lots of movies etc. that take lots of room.

Hope this helps.
 

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what Charles said...
 
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Well thats true to an extent, but most every program today simply does not benefit from more than 8GB RAM. Even multiple programs at once. 16GB cant hurt but I dont think any normal person will ever notice it. Gamers are a different story.

Hard drives get accessed far more than you elude to,. If you ever used a computer with an SSD drive you would instantly see the difference. Any computer that has 4GB, especially 8GB RAM already will benefit far more going to an SSD hard drive from a mechanical drive than a RAM upgrade.

My laptop has 32GB RAM, two 1TB Nvme SSD drives in RAID as a boot drive and a 4TB SSD data drive. Now that exact system runs about 20% faster with SSD hard drives verse mechanical hard drive for the boot drive, even though the 32GB of memory is never filled, not even close. I just cant fill it I have tried.

You need pay 0.00. I'll show you how to change hard drives and RAM in an email. No one you should know could charge you anything for that with a straight face.

If your computer is 2 years old or more you might be better off getting a new one with 8 GB RAM and at least a 1TB SSD, depending on your current computer model. Anything more than 8GB RAM starts to give less return verse faster SSD type drives and once you get to 16GB RAM you just dont need more RAM unless you are doing on the fly HD video editing or other very special circumstances.

In 2017 almost any off the shelf computer is going to make the average user happy, no upgrades needed.
 

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Hard drives in desktops have about a 7 year Mean Time Between Failures, about 4 years for laptops. If your computer is working well, but older, having the drive cloned (duplicated) so it boots properly allows you to add a larger drive and helps protect you from drive failure. It also gives you more storage space. Most cloning software requires you to use a larger drive for the clone. Cloning software is available free, just can't recall the name right now, but it's easy to find online.

The other common failure over the years is the power supply. Dells use pretty cheap parts, and I have had to replace several of their power supplies. It takes a few minutes. The most common sign of power supply problems is the computer shuts down on its own, usually crashing out, not an orderly shutdown. With some setups, it will crash and reboot continually. The last problem is fatal, that happens if the capacitors dry out, and it just won't operate. It tries to boot (or not) This can happen with heat or even lack of use.

Most of my multiple computers are refurbished, and I clone and replace the hard drives right away. You can get refurbished computers pretty cheap with small hard drives, put in a clone and keep the old hard drive, or use it for an occasional backup, so if the new drive fails, I still have access to the Windows licensed OS. Replacing the mother board means your OS license is void.

Large hard drives are not all that expensive anymore, but buy a premium brand and model. They do seem to last longer. You also have to make sure the drive is the correct type for your computer, but your friend will know.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys y'all answered my question very well.
 

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Memory in a computer is separate from the hard drive. If you have a desktop you buy it according to the style in your current machine. They are labeled by size and they just plug into existing slots in the machine. Fairly easy to change out.
 

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What was said in prior posts is correct. However, to put it in non-technical terms, the real question is, what do you use the computer for? If you use it to browse the internet and send email, your system requirements will be quite different than if you're into heavy gaming. What is it about your computer that you believe requires fixing? From a technical perspective, and you may have to ask your friend for the information, what do you have now, i.e. RAM, disk drive, CPU, what is he suggesting you go to and why does he think you will benefit from the upgrade. With that information we can probably be more specific with our opinions and recommendations.
 
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