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I am currently building a sewing cabinet for my daughter which like many cabinet designs has plywood components wrapped with hardwood edging. With the paper thin plywood veneers these days and the fact that total thickness is less than 3/4 what I have been doing is planing the edging to exact thickness of the ply (not exactly easy) and trying to line up exactly during glue up. Needless to say the end result is not perfect most of the time causing sand through of the ply veneer in some places.
One thought I had is to leave the edging thicker and use a hand plane to match the ply. I know enough about hand planes to be dangerous so what type of plane should I consider for this. I have a low angle block and am becoming more proficient with it. Perhaps a low angle jack?
Am I thinking right or is there a better way?

Thanks
 

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Why not leave the edging wide enough to allow a generous trim on both sides? Then use a top-bearing flush cut router bit to trim it off after the glue has dried. I've used that method with success several times.
 

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Another vote for using a flush trim bit. Depending on panel size can be done on router table or hand held. For hand held if panel is 3/4" may need to rig up support to provide wider surface for router to rest on.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've used a flush trim bit on thin banding but in this case it is 2" wide. I suppose this would work on a router table with a big enough bit. Any experience out there?
 

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Al...might this be a candidate for first trimming down to size on a table saw, sanding the surface clean and then assemble and glue...? by standing it on edge...?
 

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Another approach:
I'm assuming that what you're referring to is some type of butt joint where the edge of one side is exposed?
It's probably too late to change horses, but have you considered a corner cap of some design?
It'll protect the corner from physical abuse...ie the veneer getting chipped.
If you rabbet out the exposed panel's edge, a 3/4" x 1/4" cap would give generous coverage.
 

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There is a simple jig in my uploads that I built to do the same job. I would set the bit shy of flush a couple of thou and sand to flush with it. A flush trim bit in a router table with a tall fence works really well. You set the bearing a little higher than the trim is thick and run the panel on edge. The same idea works with a table saw equipped with a sacrificial board attached to the fence. You leave a gap under the sacrificial fence for the edge band to go under and you set the edge of the sacrificial board even with the edge of the blade (only have the blade up as high as the banding is thick). This will be a little rougher cut than the router so you definitely want to leave the banding with a couple of extra thou to sand flush. As you can see there are a few good methods to use but using a plane is not one of them. A specially designed plane might work well but an average block plane will cause you problems.
 
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Tom, you are well in hand with these guys. Definitely look into a trim bit. You will want to rig a platform so the router isn't "tippy" - one trick is to gang the boards you want to trim together, each separated by a gap that is a little wider than the bit.

Modern plywood veneers are amazingly thin and it's incredibly easy to take them down to the next layer. But once that layer is exposed there are some tricks. The easiest is to get a matching "furniture repair pen" and touch it up. Won't be perfect but will stand the casual look test.

Also, to avoid cross cut splintering/tearout when sawing, use a zero clearance insert in your TS. Also use a knife to scribe the line. That breaks the fibers for a much cleaner cut.
 

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I am currently building a sewing cabinet for my daughter which like many cabinet designs has plywood components wrapped with hardwood edging. With the paper thin plywood veneers these days and the fact that total thickness is less than 3/4 what I have been doing is planing the edging to exact thickness of the ply (not exactly easy) and trying to line up exactly during glue up. Needless to say the end result is not perfect most of the time causing sand through of the ply veneer in some places.
One thought I had is to leave the edging thicker and use a hand plane to match the ply. I know enough about hand planes to be dangerous so what type of plane should I consider for this. I have a low angle block and am becoming more proficient with it. Perhaps a low angle jack?
Am I thinking right or is there a better way?

Thanks
splining is excellent for alignment and strength...
over size your banding by a hair breath and use a bottom bearing flush trimming bit... (I really like a down shear trim bit for this)...
Woodworker.com: Optimizephrase If
build you a trimming guide...

an idea maker....
instead of making the dadoed end piece.. use scrap blocks instead between the boards to be trimmed/flushed...

.


.
 

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I've used a flush trim bit on thin banding but in this case it is 2" wide. I suppose this would work on a router table with a big enough bit. Any experience out there?
yes...
lots...
see the idea picture...
no balancing required...
no wobble...
nothing to spend...
 

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there has to be something here you can use...

Robot Check
 

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Good question, good answers. Flush trim bit for sure. I do recall seeing a device for trimming that had a blade on a block that was made for this purpose. Google edge banding trimmer. Here are some examples, the first one is Wood River, the second one is Rockler, the third one is home depot, fifth is the Freud model. They have various reviews, but most suggest go slow and let the blade do its work. Leaves the edging slightly proud to be lightly sanded even. Replacement blades are proprietary for each, so a little pricey. All are plastic. The fourth one is the Festool, about 10x the price of the others at $190. The first four are a a bit like Japanese planes in that you pull them rather than push.

Sorry about the mixed numbering sequence in the copy, the pictures got mixed when I posted.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Here is a better explanation of my issue

I appreciate the responses and I can see how a flush trim bit would be great for thinner stock. I thought that some pics might show a little better what I'm doing.

As you can see the 2" mitered edging on the top of the cabinet is what I'm talking about. The only way I think I could use a flush trim bit in this case is with a very tall fence (although the FastCap tool that kp91 mentioned looked interesting). I also am a little concerned that a 2" bit would really need to be finessed with multiple passes which is doable.

So now that I have hopefully explained the situation a little better, does the group feel that flush trim bit is still the ticket?

Thanks again

Tom
 

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Tom - your having trouble visualizing the placement of the router and the tipping aspect. If you widen your work piece thickness by attaching something to the side of your piece "V" thereby making it thicker, then your router plate would ride along the widened piece, with the router bit trimming your edging flush with the panel.
So basically, triple the thickness of the edge of piece "V" by attaching something to it. No need for a very tall fence, you just need to support the panel on its side.

Having said all that, I would be more tempted to do what your doing - use a plane to flush up the edging to the panel.
 

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Or you can take your hand plane and trim it down with either. Less set up and you would be done before you would be able to get a bit in the router and all the trim and router table set up.
 

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spline the banding...
biscuit or spline the miters...
slot the edges for the spline w/ the router riding on the top of the panel and banding...
assemble..
the banding will be flush to the panel's top face...
the banding will be proud on the back of the panel...

now..
you can leave it like that or if you need perfection use a low angle Jack plane to rough it into submission...
finish up w/ a smoothing plane to take you into happiness...
hand sand the last bit of fuzz til you weep w/ joy...
do not use a sponge block, ROS or free hand...
use a hard sanding block made from scrap or one similar to one of these...

.


since this the back of the panel a blem should not be an issue..

the other plan....

experiment first...
stand a test piece of ply on it's edge..
set the router on the edge of ply and note how it rocks.. (the router)..
go back and look at the pic I posted and note how the router is riding on the panel that is being trimmed and another panel to steady the router..
the second panel we'll call it a steady rest...
when you trim, place the bit between the panel that is being trimmed and the steady rest for maximum router control...
please do not climb cut..
see the PDF's...

the flush trim bit extends out of the bottom of the router and down the face of the banding...
the bit's bearing rides against the plywood panel..
the bearing makes sure that the banding ends up flush to the panel...
this is a one pass cut...
hand sand for final...

suggest you make up several banded panels from what ever you have laying around to get the ''feel'' for things...
especially when the bearing leaves the ply and you are trimming/surfacing the miters...


.
 

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