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About a year ago, I was in an ER because my gastric feeding tube came out. While there, a guy came in on a gurney with his leg wrapped in bloody gauze on the front of his thigh. Turns out he was using his battery operated circ saw and had pinned the blade guard out of the way. They'd had to take the blade out of the saw in order to avoid tearing open a major artery. He was a very unhappy guy. He left before I did, but he had his 6 1/2 inch blade in his hand.

My point is just a little reminder that those blade guards are there for a reason Be safe, If that blade had struck a little to the right, he'd have bled out. Be safe out there.
 

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It does not hurt (no Pun intended) to be reminded from time to time of the danger lurking in the shop.

Our Mens shed recently obtained a radial arm saw, and i mention the dangers of using that type of saw.
 
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That story made me pucker a little. Carbide vs flesh is a losing proposition.

I give tools plenty of respect since they can maim you if they want to or if you are dumb for a second.

Plenty of close calls but still have all my fingers. I've had plenty of dumb moments.
 

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That story made me pucker a little. Carbide vs flesh is a losing proposition.

I give tools plenty of respect since they can maim you if they want to or if you are dumb for a second.

Plenty of close calls but still have all my fingers. I've had plenty of dumb moments.
I think most of us have been there at some point if not more often.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have been very careful about using power tools. I have safety devices (blade guards, Grripper, push sticks, featherboards, etc.), but most of all, I can not bring myself to have my hands within about 4-6 inches from a blade. I still unplug a saw when changing blades. I still preplan every rip and cross cut, and use a sled or jig whenever possible. Same with rifles and pistols, cannot bring myself to point the muzzle at any part of me, even when cleaning. I want to checkout with all my parts firmly attached. This ER incident was a great reinforcement of good safety habits.
 

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It does not hurt (no Pun intended) to be reminded from time to time of the danger lurking in the shop.

Our Mens shed recently obtained a radial arm saw, and i mention the dangers of using that type of saw.
I have one I rarely use. My Industrial Arts teacher was ruptured while attempting to rip some warped lumber on one with the pawls in place. My mother never differentiated the two types of experience you can learn from: The pain from your own and the pain from someone else's.
 

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About a year ago, I was in an ER because my gastric feeding tube came out. While there, a guy came in on a gurney with his leg wrapped in bloody gauze on the front of his thigh. Turns out he was using his battery operated circ saw and had pinned the blade guard out of the way. They'd had to take the blade out of the saw in order to avoid tearing open a major artery. He was a very unhappy guy. He left before I did, but he had his 6 1/2 inch blade in his hand.

My point is just a little reminder that those blade guards are there for a reason Be safe, If that blade had struck a little to the right, he'd have bled out. Be safe out there.
Symmetry Font Electric blue Pattern Circle
BE safe...
My first skill saw was given to me in the late sixties from an older carpenter that was helping my brothers and myself add a two story room addition to my mom's house.. It was an old Porter Cable circular saw with no existing guard. I used it for many years and had to turn it upside down after making a cut because the blade would coast for a very long time before stopping. When they made good bearings. On rare occasions I forgot and it would cut a doughnut on the concrete floors..At the time I didn't know better and everyone used the saw. Nobody was ever hurt with it.This was pre carbide blades and we carried sharpening files to the job.

The skill saw is no more dangerous cutting (letting in) framed wall studs for 3/4 bracing with no guard, probably less, than any one on a ladder reaching out and cutting limbs with a chain saw (with 16" plus two sided no guarded teeth). I use a chainsaw with one or two hands, like my skill saw, depending the circumstances. I also have a permanent swing lock on the skill saw guard to keep it up for certain let in K brace cuts. I am extremely aware of potential hazards, strictly attentive to binding, and use two hands. It's what I do for a living, cut boards/sheet goods to size every day, and regularly make a thousand+ cuts in two days with sheet goods. My eyes are glued to the fingers/blade every cut.

In my years in the trade over half a century, working with untold amount of other carpenters, I have come to the conclusion there are just some people that should not work with power tools that have blades, or can do harm, and should not be allowed in a shop with others. It is not in their genes to understand the hazards, nor have the co-ordination. . I know my own limitations, and there are many things I'm just not qualified to do. When I began as a carpenter, there were very few people that had/used a skill saw, and they were carpenters who learned from other carpenters their use and danger. Today anyone/everyone can (and does) go buy a cordless saw, without having any experience whatsoever in its use, nor the dangers. Thus the overwhelming amount of safety discussion on most wood working forums, and rightly so.

I got rid of my two Delta radial arm saws because I just felt they were unsafe, and I believe they are the most dangerous tool that was in my shop. That large blade can go on attack in a New York second. I do all plywood cross cuts on my table saw, and do not use a sled due to piece size. When doing sub work for a cabinet shop, our trim carpenter cut off three of his fingers using a compound slide chop saw, holding the piece with his hand in the blade path,( huge never do). Same as a radial saw can. They were sewed back with 50% +/- use.

I don't depend on safety devices to be safe. I do not use splitters or guards on my table saw due to my production methods. For me, they create hazards, and are difficult (dangerous) to work around. I have in-feed and out-feed tables so can turn loose the sheet anytime. On router tables I have set up with one for each profile, I use ball bearing guides and add side fence and bit cover to minimize danger. Push blocks on joiner, and none on table saw, as for my application the piece is too large. I work hard concentrating to keep my mind on my work, and nor day dreaming during long production. Like the coach says when at bat, keep your eye on the ball (blade:)
Yes, I have all ten fingers, still, thank you Lord.
Yes, be safe, and be thinking. Not all tools are (safe) for the accoasional handy man.
 

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View attachment 401961 BE safe...
My first skill saw was given to me in the late sixties from an older carpenter that was helping my brothers and myself add a two story room addition to my mom's house.. It was an old Porter Cable circular saw with no existing guard. I used it for many years and had to turn it upside down after making a cut because the blade would coast for a very long time before stopping. When they made good bearings. On rare occasions I forgot and it would cut a doughnut on the concrete floors..At the time I didn't know better and everyone used the saw. Nobody was ever hurt with it.This was pre carbide blades and we carried sharpening files to the job.

The skill saw is no more dangerous cutting (letting in) framed wall studs for 3/4 bracing with no guard, probably less, than any one on a ladder reaching out and cutting limbs with a chain saw (with 16" plus two sided no guarded teeth). I use a chainsaw with one or two hands, like my skill saw, depending the circumstances. I also have a permanent swing lock on the skill saw guard to keep it up for certain let in K brace cuts. I am extremely aware of potential hazards, strictly attentive to binding, and use two hands. It's what I do for a living, cut boards/sheet goods to size every day, and regularly make a thousand+ cuts in two days with sheet goods. My eyes are glued to the fingers/blade every cut.

In my years in the trade over half a century, working with untold amount of other carpenters, I have come to the conclusion there are just some people that should not work with power tools that have blades, or can do harm, and should not be allowed in a shop with others. It is not in their genes to understand the hazards, nor have the co-ordination. . I know my own limitations, and there are many things I'm just not qualified to do. When I began as a carpenter, there were very few people that had/used a skill saw, and they were carpenters who learned from other carpenters their use and danger. Today anyone/everyone can (and does) go buy a cordless saw, without having any experience whatsoever in its use, nor the dangers. Thus the overwhelming amount of safety discussion on most wood working forums, and rightly so.

I got rid of my two Delta radial arm saws because I just felt they were unsafe, and I believe they are the most dangerous tool that was in my shop. That large blade can go on attack in a New York second. I do all plywood cross cuts on my table saw, and do not use a sled due to piece size. When doing sub work for a cabinet shop, our trim carpenter cut off three of his fingers using a compound slide chop saw, holding the piece with his hand in the blade path,( huge never do). Same as a radial saw can. They were sewed back with 50% +/- use.

I don't depend on safety devices to be safe. I do not use splitters or guards on my table saw due to my production methods. For me, they create hazards, and are difficult (dangerous) to work around. I have in-feed and out-feed tables so can turn loose the sheet anytime. On router tables I have set up with one for each profile, I use ball bearing guides and add side fence and bit cover to minimize danger. Push blocks on joiner, and none on table saw, as for my application the piece is too large. I work hard concentrating to keep my mind on my work, and nor day dreaming during long production. Like the coach says when at bat, keep your eye on the ball (blade:)
Yes, I have all ten fingers, still, thank you Lord.
Yes, be safe, and be thinking. Not all tools are (safe) for the accoasional handy man.
My table saw is a SawStop. I once hit metal and learned real quick how serious it is about safety. My only wish is it would have a breakover clutch that would release when the arbor torque exceeded the max developed motor torque, thereby stopping the blade without stopping the heavy motor armature. That might prevent having to replace the blade.
 

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The most dangerous tool in the shop is the loose nut holding the tool.
I was ripping some 1/4" plexi glass on my table saw to make some jigs for my routers. About a three foot square ripping a 8" strip. the fence set at the 8" rip. Should have ran the large drop off against the fence for better control, leaving the smaller 8" piece for the off fall. In keeping a serious grip on the plexi, I inadvertently pushed the large piece ahead of the 8" piece and pinched the blade. All hell broke loose. The blade was a thin kerf 10" and what happened was the pinched section flew off, about 2-3" long, full of teeth still attached to about 1/2" of curved blade.This automatically put the 4300 rpm blade super out of balance and the blade began the worst wobble throwing the tight fit wood blade insert across the room. Hit the E stop and examined damage. Saw the blade missing a lot of teeth and a section of the blade,which I couldn't find where it went. I do know it wasn't embedded in my fore head. When I blew out the lower dust chute to ck out arbor run out, there lay the the piece of blade. It had been thrown down inside the saw dustbuild up not vacuumed yet, the safest place to land.(Thank you again, Lord) Lesson learned!
 

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About a year ago, I was in an ER because my gastric feeding tube came out. While there, a guy came in on a gurney with his leg wrapped in bloody gauze on the front of his thigh. Turns out he was using his battery operated circ saw and had pinned the blade guard out of the way. They'd had to take the blade out of the saw in order to avoid tearing open a major artery. He was a very unhappy guy. He left before I did, but he had his 6 1/2 inch blade in his hand.

My point is just a little reminder that those blade guards are there for a reason Be safe, If that blade had struck a little to the right, he'd have bled out. Be safe out there.
My "Pucker" point with power saws was when I found out my Great grandfather was killed by a kickback while using a table saw. I dismissed the idea of riding knifes or splitters until then. I quickly ordered a riving knife as my saw is built to use them. And did not use my saw until the knife was installed.
 

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I was ripping some 1/4" plexi glass on my table saw to make some jigs for my routers. About a three foot square ripping a 8" strip. the fence set at the 8" rip. Should have ran the large drop off against the fence for better control, leaving the smaller 8" piece for the off fall. In keeping a serious grip on the plexi, I inadvertently pushed the large piece ahead of the 8" piece and pinched the blade. All hell broke loose. The blade was a thin kerf 10" and what happened was the pinched section flew off, about 2-3" long, full of teeth still attached to about 1/2" of curved blade.This automatically put the 4300 rpm blade super out of balance and the blade began the worst wobble throwing the tight fit wood blade insert across the room. Hit the E stop and examined damage. Saw the blade missing a lot of teeth and a section of the blade,which I couldn't find where it went. I do know it wasn't embedded in my fore head. When I blew out the lower dust chute to ck out arbor run out, there lay the the piece of blade. It had been thrown down inside the saw dustbuild up not vacuumed yet, the safest place to land.(Thank you again, Lord) Lesson learned!
Plexiglass is a dangerous material to cut. It tends to re-fuse as it's being cut due to its bond strength/melting point relationship. Slowing the blade down and increasing the feed seems to work the best, but doing that is impractical. I've found the best alternative is to take shallow bites as quickly as safety allows. That way, the heat has time to dissipate before the melted plastic has time to re-fuse to the nearest cooler surface, such as itself or the blade.
 

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Plexiglass is a dangerous material to cut. It tends to re-fuse as it's being cut due to its bond strength/melting point relationship. Slowing the blade down and increasing the feed seems to work the best, but doing that is impractical. I've found the best alternative is to take shallow bites as quickly as safety allows. That way, the heat has time to dissipate before the melted plastic has time to re-fuse to the nearest cooler surface, such as itself or the blade.
Plexiglass is designed as to be cut, preferably by someone who has learned/knows how, safely and accurately. You tube can help, but beware the excited first timers It is like any product cut on a table saw, needing to use correct blades/methods. . I use an eighty tooth fine cross cut, usually one of my semi dull cabinet blades. It does not 'melt' the plexi glass running at 4300 rpm. There are blades made specifically for plexiglass if you can warrant the price for a lot of use. Like any product sized on the table saw, there are many ways to accomplish the cut, some better/safer than others. "Pinching" the material as I explained above can be eliminated by cutting slightly oversize first the safe way, then cut to desired size with smaller piece. I once was cutting 1/4" plywood piece about 16" square, ripping a small edge off. Simple cut, right? The board was slightly warped, the blade set minimum height, and the warped board popped up, drifted over the blade, caught and shot out into my belly, knocking me down and dazed for a minute. Just a very small piece of 1/4" plywood, with a lot of force. My mistake was the blade height too low to accommodate the board sliding over the top. I was taught to only raise the blade height till the gullets show. I since have changed that method and for years now I raise the blade height double thickness cut, minimum 3/4" +/- above material, increasing downward pressure of blade, and accommodating raised warped boards that are not tight to base still be cut. There is no such thing as a straight, square flat piece of plywood, and with the first cut, all the tensions are released/changed within the field. Never had any problem cutting plexi, thin acrylic up to 2" thick, and many other (plastic) composites. Cutting plexi and other plastic based material can and will fuse back with the thin fine sabre saw blades that heat up, and doesn't like high speed sanding. This does not happen when using a correct blade. Wear wraparound safety glasses and leave protective covering on the plexi for better visibility and less scratching.
 

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Some very interesting posts in this thread.

I am looking at cutting and routing some 1/4" acrylic to make some new router bases.

I made some a few years back, and cannot remember if I used the jig saw.....
 

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Some very interesting posts in this thread.

I am looking at cutting and routing some 1/4" acrylic to make some new router bases.

I made some a few years back, and cannot remember if I used the jig saw.....
I have used my jigsaw to cut plexi and acrylic. Without the blade aggressive action, but just up and down.
There are several companies that sell sabre saw blades just for your application for acrylic, and the same one for plexi.
If your acrylic does not come with protective covering just use a masking tape to protect and also to see your lines better.
Bosch bi metal T102 BF or T101A is a couple, and there are several other brands for acrylic/plexi.
Myself I use metal cutting blades which are cheaper, and I have plenty. They also work great.
Have cut with my skill saw 2" x 48 x 96 sheets of acrylic in 2' widths to handle, to then cut in strips/blocks on the large band saw for CNC machining.
I have several large boxes of scrap acrylic blocks I just can't throw away, waiting for that ?? project to build when I retire.(right)
 

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Thanks @Gary Lee ,

I just finished using the search function and went back and found some old threads on making new base plates

It transpired that I used the jig saw with a metal cutting plade.
 
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