Router Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there fraternity

Ok so as boredom takes its toll on my weary shoulders, I stand in my workshop looking desperately about for something to do.

I have just come in from the house after watching Mr. Biden settling himself in behind the Resolute Desk busy reversing most of the policies his predecessor implemented.

At this point I maybe should get on with the purpose of this post.

I am as you will be aware, I am a poor retired plumber by trade and in the last twenty or so years a lecturer in construction, and during that time lecturing period I kept my hand in by working with likeminded lecturers in other building disciplines on weekend projects which covered everything from bathrooms to house extensions.

On retiring I kept it up for a few years but a conflict of interests ensued between my body and my mind in which my body gently informed me my physical being was near knackered after forty odd years at the proverbial coal face and to slow down, while my mind was trying to kill me, by feeding me information that I was still a young agile thing.

My body won out and I informed my colleagues I was quitting as crawling about under the floorboards or across an attic space was no longer something I desired.

So converted my garage into a workshop and you know the rest.

Now as someone who worked most weekends, I had a trailer and a plethora of boxes that filled said trailer that I dragged to the projects we were working on. On giving up all the boxes containing every tool and fixings I owned ended up in various workshop cupboards etc and it has been a nightmare, pulling out containers every time you want something. Plus, my tools were not organised, with everything mixed together. So, what to do

My workshop luckily is a reasonable size, but my work bench and project assembly bench are at opposite ends so I needed something that would allow tools easily accessible to both.

So here is what I came up with i.e., tool cabinet trolley. I did in depth research on the subject and found that there are hundreds on the market of infinite price and dimension.

I could pay a couple of thousand pounds for a Snap On or a hundred pounds for a non-Snap On. Originally, they were manufactured for the motor industry, but times change and the smaller ones are more focused on the domestic market, which is where I started to look. The reason I choose my own was based on my circumstances in that mostly they are only 300mm (12inches) deep with 360-degree wheels that make it easy to navigate around my workshop. But I went for the seven drawer, 460mm wide, why, because of a worldwide in-built fault that most married men are infected with i.e., bigger and better it has to be. Married women do not possess this precious gene. It is the exclusive domain of the married man. Let me prove this by a simple analogy.

Not too long ago our main tv packed in and we set off to our UK equivalent of Best Buy to choose a replacement. My good wife dutifully perused said tv’s until she settled on a 43inch one. Whereas my nose was glued to an 85inch behemoth, with every available toy it had to offer, including a giant remote with about 500 buttons and nestled underneath an accompanying 1000-watt sound bar that would rattle your dentures and entertain most of your neighbours. The fact we wouldn’t get it through the front door and if we did, we would have to remove two chairs just to fit it in the lounge and our knees would be resting against the screen is irrelevant if you have the precious gene. None of that matters.

This male gene has many other remarkable features in that it strips what little male common sense you may have at your disposal. When visiting the likes of Home Depot, it allows you to buy an amazing array of tools you don’t need but want. My workshop in particular has many of such tools dotted around waiting patiently to be used

Luckily being a woman, my wife does not have access to the gene. If she did, we would now be bankrupt and probably homeless by now.

In the end a compromise was reached and I had to settle a lesser model. I did consider throwing a tantrum in the shop, but didn’t have my pram or toys with me, but reverted to begging instead.


So, pros and cons. Not too expensive and all the drawers are all rubber lined as is the top work surface. Wheels are roller bearing with stops. Very easy to organise your tools. The top work surface is really handy as a second worktop.

The cons are down to just one. Only two feet are swivel which allows you to turn 360 degrees but only push in one direction, so I have ordered a completely new set of all swivel feet.

Costs are, original £200 reduced to £159 and on clearance I got it for £134 including delivery, so happy bunny.

To summarise the reason, I posted this is because there may be a few members who find themselves in the same situation as myself especially with limited storage and access and it offers one solution to make workshop tools etc a little more accessible, and most workshops have at least 300mm (12inch) to wheel it about. In my case I use it solely for maintenance tools.

There are a number of profiles available with a mixture of drawers and cupboard.

Ideal for router and bit storage.

Colin
Off his trolley in Scotland






397600
397601
397602
397603
397604
397605
397606
397607
 

·
Premium Member
Frank
Joined
·
352 Posts
Colin,

I feel your pain. I now have three tool cabinets and all are full of tools. Some I use every day and others as needed. When my Dad passed away, I gave my Son his large SnapOn tool box. He still uses it today. My problem is that my shop is 26’x32’ with my 1966 Mustang in one bay. The rest of the shop is for my tools, both metal working and woodworking. I have tried to not purchase any new tools as I have about every thing I need. I have built cabinets under my Mill and drill press to keep like tools together so I do not have to look for them. My Dad worked out of buckets and I could never find a tool, so my shop is very organized. If you look at some of my post, you can view the cabinets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Enjoyed your post as usual, very entertaining but with a point. Your " trolley" is the same as what we here in the states can get at Harbor Freight. I have one and with the exception on the two fixed wheels love it. For the money is one of the best tools harbor Freight offers, Very well built and I have the lower end model.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,480 Posts
A delightful read as usual. My shop is a 12x24 shed, wired, insulated, well lit, but very crowded with tools, saws, sanders, etc. I have a tool box in there, but no room to roll it around. It's a Harbor Freight cheapo, and it holds most of the little stuff. I have shelves on either side of my workbench, and they are somewhat organized. One big help is having bought a large number of plastic boxes, 2 inch and 6 inch, that stack neatly and are covered so they are sawdust free. I mark the ends with the contents, which also helps remind where various gadgets and accessories, and bits reside.

As to matter of the buy everything gene, I definitely have that. I bought most of my stuff in my highest earning years, and I'm constantly being surprised to discover that I have some obscure, seldom used gadge or doo-dad that I've not yet used. It's a little bit of Christmas morning every time I find something old/new. I've noticed though, that my methods have simplified, so I'm unlikely to ever use some of those goodies I was compelled to pluck off a store shelf.

It's a relief to know it's merely genetic.
 

·
Registered
Theo
Joined
·
7,182 Posts
Who needs wheels, when you can have tracks? This is what I want.
 

Attachments

·
Official Greeter
Ross
Joined
·
10,050 Posts
Great read Colin
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Colin,

I feel your pain. I now have three tool cabinets and all are full of tools. Some I use every day and others as needed. When my Dad passed away, I gave my Son his large SnapOn tool box. He still uses it today. My problem is that my shop is 26’x32’ with my 1966 Mustang in one bay. The rest of the shop is for my tools, both metal working and woodworking. I have tried to not purchase any new tools as I have about every thing I need. I have built cabinets under my Mill and drill press to keep like tools together so I do not have to look for them. My Dad worked out of buckets and I could never find a tool, so my shop is very organized. If you look at some of my post, you can view the cabinets.
Hi Frank it looks as if my particular problem is endemic with most workshops. Ie too many tools, too little space. It must be a great feeling getting to use tools that your dad used and cherished, as you will.

colin
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A delightful read as usual. My shop is a 12x24 shed, wired, insulated, well lit, but very crowded with tools, saws, sanders, etc. I have a tool box in there, but no room to roll it around. It's a Harbor Freight cheapo, and it holds most of the little stuff. I have shelves on either side of my workbench, and they are somewhat organized. One big help is having bought a large number of plastic boxes, 2 inch and 6 inch, that stack neatly and are covered so they are sawdust free. I mark the ends with the contents, which also helps remind where various gadgets and accessories, and bits reside.

As to matter of the buy everything gene, I definitely have that. I bought most of my stuff in my highest earning years, and I'm constantly being surprised to discover that I have some obscure, seldom used gadge or doo-dad that I've not yet used. It's a little bit of Christmas morning every time I find something old/new. I've noticed though, that my methods have simplified, so I'm unlikely to ever use some of those goodies I was compelled to pluck off a store shelf.

It's a relief to know it's merely genetic.
Hi Tom, firstly delighted you are back to your old self. If you are anything like me your nurse will also be delighted. As you say you cannot have too many tools, even if they are only to look at. My big problem is much of my storage is open and a cleaning nightmare. Like you starting to get closed trays.

Colin
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2 Posts
Thanks for sharing your story. This information was really very interesting to me. It is not often that you come across a retired plumber ready to share his life story and talk about what you may have left after 40 years of honest work. My grandfather was also a plumber and is now retired. All his life, he hated his profession. He always tells me that it was a big mistake in his life. He had artistic ability and was good at drawing, but his father forced him to become a plumber. Now, when he has plumbing problems, he always turns to . He explained that he will no longer touch the instruments in retirement and live the way he wants.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,813 Posts
After moving to a new house less than 1/2 the size of the old house I had a problem with tools. For the stationary tools, I only took the essential ones. For everything else, I threw as much as I could lift in boxes. When it came time to unpack I set up piles of the same type of tools. Measuring and leveling (tape measure, ruler, compass, pantograph,lazer, line level) etc. etc. The same for hammering such as hammers, crowbars, drill hammers, nail removers, and so on with every type of tool that seems to somehow go together. I then went through a very difficult process. What do I need on a daily or even a monthly basis. And how many duplicate items do I need. I was amazed at the number of screwdrivers I had and the number of hammers. So after hours of sorting, pulling things out, and putting them back I ended up with several boxes that we so heavy I couldn't lift them. Those boxes were put out at a garage sale and sold for pennies on the dollar. I just wanted to get rid of stuff. It's been a few months but so far I haven't found that I needed anything that I got rid of. It was a liberating feeling after it was all done. Now I have all the woodworking books to dispose of. The good thing is that I don't have to sort those out.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,480 Posts
Donate the books to a library. Our local library keeps some books for circulation, but most go into a volunteer run bookstore. I also have a large library of woodworking books.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top