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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So far, I have been using the router where a router table has not been necessary, or indeed usable.
Now I am building a cabinet and need precise repeatability, which has been impossible to get using my old methods. Therefore I am building a router table, but without wanting to spend much money or time on this first attempt. My questions to you experts are
1) is there a simpler design available?
2) is this design workable?
3) should I do anything differently, or use extra care with some detail?
4) is MDF or plywood (both approx 16 mm thick, well sanded) best to use?
5) how is dust extraction best done?

The parts to be used are the board (MDF or plywood) size 500*700 mm (or smaller); four legs 90*45 mm length just enough to comfortably fit the router under the board; fence from a 45*45 piece of wood, as long as the table is wide; and the base plate that is already on the router (some dort of plastic, 2.5 mm thick). Also bracing material for the legs, 4 long replacement screws to hold the router to the base, and 6 C clamps.

The router plate will be placed flush with the board surface, without possibility of lateral movement. The actual base will be used to mark where holes through the board will be drilled, for the long screws and for the router bit(s). The fence will have holes in the ends to accomodate two C clamps that fasten it to the board. The legs will have holes in the low end for C clamps to fasten them to a workbench (or whatever).

When accessing the router, the 'table' will be turned upside down (with the fence - if then fitted - let hanging outside the workbench).

When I need to repeat a fence position, I will mark it with a knife on the board (putting clues when needed to find the right set of marks again).
 

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I'm sorry I just can't help it.... when I read the title "really simple router table" I remembered a image I had seen when searching for router table on google......

I know this is not a help at all but this person went to really simple......

See attachment

Ed
 

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My questions to you experts are
1) is there a simpler design available?

A). You might try purchasing a kitchen cabinet from your local home depot etc. I have an old cabinet that I assembled into a router table.

2) is this design workable?

A). Yes

3) should I do anything differently, or use extra care with some detail?

A) The cut out for the router base is important. When using longer screws - make sure you match the original mounting screws to the replacement (longer screws), some are METRIC and other are SAE. It's important since they are not interchangeable.

4) is MDF or plywood (both approx 16 mm thick, well sanded) best to use?

A). MDF is far superior where you might have conditions that cause warping. Laminate BOTH sides of the MDF (top & bottom). My preference is MDF. Keep in mind that MDF will not hold a SCREW.

5) how is dust extraction best done?

A). Most routers have acessories made specifically for each router - check the manufactures web site.


All the best
cfm

The parts to be used are the board (MDF or plywood) size 500*700 mm (or smaller); four legs 90*45 mm length just enough to comfortably fit the router under the board; fence from a 45*45 piece of wood, as long as the table is wide; and the base plate that is already on the router (some dort of plastic, 2.5 mm thick). Also bracing material for the legs, 4 long replacement screws to hold the router to the base, and 6 C clamps.

The router plate will be placed flush with the board surface, without possibility of lateral movement. The actual base will be used to mark where holes through the board will be drilled, for the long screws and for the router bit(s). The fence will have holes in the ends to accomodate two C clamps that fasten it to the board. The legs will have holes in the low end for C clamps to fasten them to a workbench (or whatever).

When accessing the router, the 'table' will be turned upside down (with the fence - if then fitted - let hanging outside the workbench).

When I need to repeat a fence position, I will mark it with a knife on the board (putting clues when needed to find the right set of marks again).[/QUOTE]
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys (especially cfm) for the info. I have saved the MDF for the "real" table, and done the drilling etc on the plywood. No legs - using a wide-opening foldable workbench for the 'experimental' version.
After the first tests I found that a) I got perfectly repeatable cuts(!); b) the dust extraction does not work very well; and c) getting the router fastened is a pain in the neck!! so I just bought a second router for plunge work.
Next table (using MDF) will be bigger, and have some means of adding thickness to the output part of the fence.
 

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Hi, Occam.
I finished my first router table about 2 weeks ago, and I did the same thing you just did...it's practically a table built to build my next table :) And on that table, I plan on putting this fence:
http://www.patwarner.com/routerfence.html

That's probably the best micro-adjustable fence I've ever seen, and there's a plan for it in Fine Woodworking Magazine (#144) if you want to try your hand at building it :)

Vox
 

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Check out the thread: "Anyone have an interesting table they use for portable routers?" by Reible in the portable routing section for the images I posted of a couple Shopnotes table plans. Both simple plans, the pictures may give you ideas you want to include in your table. Plastic laminate top and bottom will help with rigidity and stability plus ease of moving workpieces on the table, and a 1 1/4" (30MM) top thickness will help cut down on vibrations and be beefy enough to support even 3HP models.
 
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