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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the Triton TWX7 work bench with the Triton router module mounted underneath.
I was using a 4” three bladed router bit with a bearing at each end. I was routing a piece of three inch ply when the router bit grabbed the wood, tore itself out of the chuck (which was definitely tightened up before I started) and flew across the workshop. It grazed my thumb and elbow on its way. Fortunately I suffered no injuries apart from shock!
The lesson learned is ; how often do we check our installation is secure? When I investigated I found the whole router assembly (secured to the underside of the bench module with four bolts) had loosened over time meaning the entire router was loose!
Thankfully I got way with it (this time)!

Be careful out there!
 

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Wow...That is a monster cutter....
When you say, "three inch ply" what dimension is that?

BTW, welcome to the forum.
 

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I have the Triton TWX7 work bench with the Triton router module mounted underneath.
I was using a 4” three bladed router bit with a bearing at each end. I was routing a piece of three inch ply when the router bit grabbed the wood, tore itself out of the chuck (which was definitely tightened up before I started) and flew across the workshop. It grazed my thumb and elbow on its way. Fortunately I suffered no injuries apart from shock!
The lesson learned is ; how often do we check our installation is secure? When I investigated I found the whole router assembly (secured to the underside of the bench module with four bolts) had loosened over time meaning the entire router was loose!
Thankfully I got way with it (this time)!

Be careful out there!
In the Australian woodwork forum, people have YEARS AGO already pointed out that the UK designed TWX7 is not strong enough to carry the weight of the Triton Router.
Australian designed Triton Router Table RTA300 was much more robust but was unfortunately discontinued.
 

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Welcome to the Forum!

And thanks for sharing. It's a great reminder for all of us to periodically check the safety status on all power tools -- mounted, or not.

- Bob
 

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That is how it grabbed...."When I investigated I found the whole router assembly (secured to the underside of the bench module with four bolts) had loosened over time meaning the entire router was loose!"
No Doubt the bit pivitoted or worse yet bounced into the work from the slop in the router screws and it bit off more than it can chew.
It is however very concerning that the bit came lose from the chuck. One thing to be sure of when locking down your router bits, NEVER bottom the bit to the bottom of the chuck. This (depending on how your chick is designed) could give you a false sense of tight grip on the bit even though you feel a lock on the chuck nut.
I always try to have 1/8 inch between the bottom of the bit and the bottom of the chuck.
calabrese55
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
That is how it grabbed...."When I investigated I found the whole router assembly (secured to the underside of the bench module with four bolts) had loosened over time meaning the entire router was loose!"
No Doubt, the bit pivitoted or worse yet bounced into the work from the slop in the router screws and it bit off more than it can chew.
It is however very concerning that the bit came lose from the chuck. One thing to be sure of when locking down your router bits, NEVER bottom the bit to the bottom of the chuck. This (depending on how your chick is designed) could give you a false sense of tight grip on the bit even though you feel a lock on the chuck nut.
I always try to have 1/8 inch between the bottom of the bit and the bottom of the chuck.
calabrese55
Thanks for your reply and information, I agree with your conclusion regarding the pivoting. The router bit was definitely tightened and set at the mark shown on the router bit (I mark all my bits with black marker to show how far they should be, in the collet). The force damaged the collet and (incredibly) appears to have bent the 1/2” diameter router bit, which now causes excessive vibration to the point it can no longer be used! A salient lesson!
 

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Thanks for your reply and information, I agree with your conclusion regarding the pivoting. The router bit was definitely tightened and set at the mark shown on the router bit (I mark all my bits with black marker to show how far they should be, in the collet). The force damaged the collet and (incredibly) appears to have bent the 1/2” diameter router bit, which now causes excessive vibration to the point it can no longer be used! A salient lesson!
Wow marking your router bits is a great idea wish I had thought of it. If possible can you post a picture of the bent 1/2 inch router bit? My reason is it can serve as a reminder to all of us new and old ( I am old) the need for respect of our tools based on the danger / damage they can create when things go wrong.
Lastly just so you know I am not trying to single you out I had a router incident and I did not fare as well.
Danger never sleeps.
calabrese55
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Wow marking your router bits is a great idea wish I had thought of it. If possible can you post a picture of the bent 1/2 inch router bit? My reason is it can serve as a reminder to all of us new and old ( I am old) the need for respect of our tools based on the danger / damage they can create when things go wrong.
Lastly just so you know I am not trying to single you out I had a router incident and I did not fare as well.
Danger never sleeps.
calabrese55

Hi,

Have attached a photo of the router bit. Also shown a measure beside it to give an idea of dimension.
Unfortunately I can’t see any damage to the bit. Rolling on a flat surface does not show that the bit shaft is bent! The bearings also seem to be ok. It’s definitely a problem with the bit as my other 1/2” bits do not vibrate in the router.
I’m hoping to send the bit back to the manufacturer to see if they can find the reason. This bit was top of the range costing £70 so I’m hoping they can find a solution but my gut feeling is that it’s a none recoverable bent shaft!!
Thanks for your interest.


On 9 Jan 2023, at 14:52, Router Forums <[email protected]> wrote:
Hi,

Have attached a photo of the router bit. Also shown a measure beside it to give an idea of dimension.
Unfortunately I can’t see any damage to the bit. Rolling on a flat surface does not show that the bit shaft is bent! The bearings also seem to be ok. It’s definitely a problem with the bit as my other 1/2” bits do not vibrate in the router.
I’m hoping to send the bit back to the manufacturer to see if they can find the reason. This bit was top of the range costing £70 so I’m hoping they can find a solution but my gut feeling is that it’s a none recoverable bent shaft!!
Thanks for your interest.
Office supplies Cylinder Font Nickel Metal



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Wow marking your router bits is a great idea wish I had thought of it. If possible can you post a picture of the bent 1/2 inch router bit? My reason is it can serve as a reminder to all of us new and old ( I am old) the need for respect of our tools based on the danger / damage they can create when things go wrong.
Lastly just so you know I am not trying to single you out I had a router incident and I did not fare as well.
Danger never sleeps.
calabrese55
calabrese55 replied to a discussion you are following at A Router Lesson Learnt!
Wow marking your router bits is a great idea wish I had thought of it. If possible can you post a picture of the bent 1/2 inch router bit? My reason is it can serve as a reminder to all of us new and old ( I am old) the need for respect of our tools based on the danger / damage they can create...
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Wow marking your router bits is a great idea wish I had thought of it. If possible can you post a picture of the bent 1/2 inch router bit? My reason is it can serve as a reminder to all of us new and old ( I am old) the need for respect of our tools based on the danger / damage they can create when things go wrong.
Lastly just so you know I am not trying to single you out I had a router incident and I did not fare as well.
Danger never sleeps.
calabrese55
 

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As a spacer, Insert a 1/4 or 1/2 inch diameter plumbing "O-ring" into the collet. In the absence of an O-ring, cut a tiny piece of .080 string trimmer line. Both items work well as spacers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Someone here on this forum mentioned a soft grommet sized to fit the inside bottom of the collet nose is insurance against that every time it's in the hole.
I’m sorry but I don’t think it’s a good idea to insert anything into the collet. These things are dangerous enough without adding’ foreign objects’ into the space. Do as I do and use a black marker to mark your router bit at the manufacturer mark shown on the bit. This should be enough without additional spacers etc.
 

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I’m sorry but I don’t think it’s a good idea to insert anything into the collet. These things are dangerous enough without adding’ foreign objects’ into the space. Do as I do and use a black marker to mark your router bit at the manufacturer mark shown on the bit. This should be enough without additional spacers etc.
Do as I do and stay away from router bits larger than 3-1/2". Use a shaper.
 

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I’m sorry but I don’t think it’s a good idea to insert anything into the collet. These things are dangerous enough without adding’ foreign objects’ into the space. Do as I do and use a black marker to mark your router bit at the manufacturer mark shown on the bit. This should be enough without additional spacers etc.
I note that the new bits sold in UK have a K mark on the side of the shaft which indicates how far to insert into the collett
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Hi James,
Yes you’re right. Uk bits are marked with a “K”, indicating how far into the collet the bit should be positioned. It’s this mark that I highlight with a black marker to help alignment. My eyes aren’t what they used to be!
 
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