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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am curious to see all the various ways members of this forum of rigged up above table dust collection on their router tables.

I am not really looking for the ubiquitous router fence with vac hose connection near the bit-cavity of the fence, but instead those special needs means of collection that you have made that collect dust when you are not using your fence.

I feel I was corrupting another thread and felt it best to start a fresh one dedicated to the topic.

Here are some examples I found on the web that come to mind.








Everyone of us seems to take inspiration from the work of others. I love seeing the ways woodworkers adapt and add their unique twists on a theme. So let’s see what you’ve got.


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Here is one that I quickly whipped up. Upon first test, it seems to work pretty good.





I took a hint from a commercial one made by Woodpeckers which included the ability to anchor it in place using starting pin hole. When you do this you get the added benefit of being able to use the dust collector itself as a starting pin.

BTW, the outside cuts were made on table saw, the inner stock removal was done using the router table, and the hole for the shop vac hose was created using an adjustable hole saw.


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I like this approach as it can be secured without an external clamp. Mine will be fitted for a Jessem Rout-R-Lift. Good ideas...
 

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nicely executed...
BUT!!!!
are those drywall screws I see???
YIKES!!!....
 

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I call them clamps. :)
you nick one of those ''clamps'' w/ that spinning router bit and you'll call them more than ''clamps''...

STAND BY FOR A PSA!!!

It's drywall screws that are really bad choice and cause problems...
Heads break off the shanks...
They are brittle..
No shear strength to speak of...
Corrode..
Stain the work...
DW screws and acidic woods do not mix..
Bugle heads split wood easily..
The American Woodworking Institute (AWI) Quality Standards forbids them in the assembly or installation of casework. The reason being they are brittle and will fail in shear.

Drywall screws have become the new duct tape...
Use drywall screws for hanging drywall.... That's their sole mission in life...

Wood screws are better than drywall screws for woodworking projects. Drywall screws are made of hardened, brittle steel, and the shaft will often snap during installation, especially if they're screwed into hardwoods. That can be a disaster when you're working with finished material and you want to remove the screw to reposition something—it's nearly impossible to get the broken-off shank out of the wood without damaging the surface.
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Drywall screws are hardened so that the Phillips slots won't strip out under the stress from high-speed screw guns. Wood screws are thicker and made of softer metal, making them more snap-resistant.
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Different thread patterns make the screws work slightly differently too. Wood screws are smooth rather than threaded just below the screw head. The smooth section of the shank slides by the top half of the wood so the head of the screw and the threads can more or less clamp both pieces of wood together.
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Drywall screws are threaded nearly all the way to the head. When you use a drywall screw to fasten two boards, the top threads will anchor in the top board and sometimes actually keep the two boards apart unless the two pieces are tightly clamped to begin with.
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The bad news is that using wood screws requires a little more prep work. You not only need to drill a pilot hole for the threads but also a wider counter-bore hole the length of the unthreaded shaft and then a countersink hole for setting the head. Sound like a lot of work? Just buy a set of three countersinking bits and they'll handle all three drilling chores at once for most common screw sizes. No more excuses for using the wrong screw.
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Drywall screws are made to fasten wallboard to studs. But the toothy threads and trumpet-shaped heads do make 'em a tempting choice for other tasks.
 

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I call them clamps. :)


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I wasn’t referring to the screws as clamps(?) - one of the photos shows a hand clamp holding the DC device to the table top. My version would use the machined holes in the top and a hold down threaded rod on a star handle to attach instead. Actually, I’ve abandoned the whole idea as unnecessary for my setup. But it is a great idea...

PS: I don’t think Stick like drywall screws, tho...at all. I get it but I still use them for jigs, not finished items.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Stick, the glue has dried and the ‘clamps’ have been removed.

To be clear, this morning I whipped that unit together in short order, added screws to the plys to serve as clamps so I could keep moving forward. I admit I was ‘living on the wild side’ this morning milling the unit, but had zero intent to leave the screws in place. I was very conscious of them when doing my work.

You bring up some good points about the screws, all valid. Good PSA.


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I wasn’t referring to the screws as clamps(?) - one of the photos shows a hand clamp holding the DC device to the table top. My version would use the machined holes in the top and a hold down threaded rod on a star handle to attach instead. Actually, I’ve abandoned the whole idea as unnecessary for my setup. But it is a great idea...

PS: I don’t think Stick like drywall screws, tho...at all. I get it but I still use them for jigs, not finished items.
what ever gave you that idea???
hug truck loads of rock w/ them... worked great too...

destroyed some very expensive tooling w/ them... that didn't work out so well...

wholesale American made fasteners are cheap and work better...
 

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I have yet to put my table to use, but it has 3 separate, blast gate controlled dust collection inlets:
Router Dust enclosure with adj inlet flow gate
Fence D/C
On table simple hood that may end up with a similar table locating device like in the video.

The flexible hose I like quite a bit, use it on my drill press and band saw as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Tulowd that is an interesting idea I see there on the left side of the table where you have the dust collection pickup. I image that could be helpful for short boards your routing a dado in because the pickup would be right within the typical path of heaviest discharge. Any other application you envision that being useful?

Cannot remember where I saw it a while back, but I believe I saw a manufacturer offering some kind of dust collection bag/box/chute that attaches to the left side of the table just below the table top. When hooked up to a DC it draws down the dust that would otherwise be thrown off the table.

If you don’t mind me asking. Does that black flex duct I see in your pictures hold the dust pickup in place pretty well once you position it?
 

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Tulowd that is an interesting idea I see there on the left side of the table where you have the dust collection pickup. I image that could be helpful for short boards your routing a dado in because the pickup would be right within the typical path of heaviest discharge. Any other application you envision that being useful?

Cannot remember where I saw it a while back, but I believe I saw a manufacturer offering some kind of dust collection bag/box/chute that attaches to the left side of the table just below the table top. When hooked up to a DC it draws down the dust that would otherwise be thrown off the table.

If you don’t mind me asking. Does that black flex duct I see in your pictures hold the dust pickup in place pretty well once you position it?
I really have no idea yet, since I haven't really used it. Since I cut 99% MDF, i really want to be well prepared. Some of it will be dependent on the particular shape of the part. Most cuts will be with bearing equipped flush trim bits and then roundovers to machine up trim panels for the car prior to wrapping in leather etc.

The end table dust collector nozzle you are talking about is something Rockler recently started selling under their router or dust collector accessories. Looks like a decent idea for sure.

The flex pipe works best if the nozzle end is heavy, otherwise it will move around a little from where you locate it. ie) the home built or Woodpecker nozzle housing looks to be a good add on for stability
 

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With the updraft on the Triton, one of those movable ports would be great, particularly when not using the fence. I feel a project coming on. I would also prefer to have a 4 inch port above the table and this shows several good ways to do that. Great posts everyone.
 
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