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Nice work Iliescu. Does acacia grow where you live?
 

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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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A well designed frame and nicely done, Iliescu. Good job.
 

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Acacia is considered a weed here. it grows at an astonishing rate.
But with an entire nation of people who have wood burner stoves none of it ever gets to be full grown.
That sounds like a pity according to what I read about it. Characteristics of Acacia Wood | URBANARA UK

It has some other interesting uses too. From Wiki: "Aboriginal Australians have traditionally harvested the seeds of some species, to be ground into flour and eaten as a paste or baked into a cake. The seeds contain as much as 25% more protein than common cereals, and they store well for long periods due to the hard seed coats.[21] In addition to utilizing the edible seed and gum, the people employed the timber for implements, weapons, fuel and musical instruments.[6] In ancient Egypt, an ointment made from the ground leaves of the plant was used to treat hemorrhoids.[23] A number of species, most notably A. mangium (hickory wattle), A. mearnsii (black wattle) and A. saligna (coojong), are economically important and are widely planted globally for wood products, tannin, firewood and fodder.[8] A. melanoxylon (blackwood) and A. aneura (mulga) supply some of the most attractive timbers in the genus.[6] Black wattle bark supported the tanning industries of several countries, and may supply tannins for production of waterproof adhesives.[6]"

Acacia is repeatedly mentioned in the Book of Exodus, perhaps referring to Acacia raddiana, in regards to the construction of the Tabernacle.[24]

Acacia is a common food source and host plant for butterflies of the genus Jalmenus. The imperial hairstreak, Jalmenus evagoras, feeds on at least 25 acacia species.[25]
 

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The leaves are a favourite of goats. Between the goat farmers, who hack of truck fulls of branches to feed their herds, and the wood burners...... no chance of any growing wild.
When we first moved here there were three big acacias just behind our back wall. Easily 10" trunks. They had survived because the plot they were on was waste ground only a few dozen yards long but away from any farmers and in the corner of a building site. Within 2 months of us arriving i saw them chopped and sectioned for wood burning.
 
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