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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I received a new router for christmas. It is the first one I've owned. It is a 3 and 1/4 horsepower model manufactured by King Canada.

After using it a very short while with a straight bit (with unpredictable results with groove width... chalked up to my newbie learning curve), I put in an Ogee bit (with bearing) and noticed that it wasn't straight. After wasting some valuable shop time trying to determine the cause, I determined that the shaft of the router was bent. Putting my dial indicator on the round part of the collet tightening nut showed rounout of about 0.005". Putting the dial indicator on a bit's bearing resulted in a runout in the neighborhood of 0.015 ". I was disapointed.

I brought it back and was gladly able to exchange it. The new one is already showing signs of simialar troubles. I'm not sure if it was ever truly straight.

My questions:
<OL><LI>Is any runout acceptable? <LI>Is it dangerous to be spinning a bit at 20,000 + rpm if it isn't turning on it's axis? <LI>Has any other user bought the same router? (Any thoughts>) <LI>Can this unit be used with any true precision? </OL>

Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the info.

First off, I didn't try measuring the runout while the router was running! What I did was secure the router in a vise and placed the indicator's magnetic base on the same vise. I placed the indicator's plunger on the end of the bearing, and slowly spun it until I found the furthest variation on the dial. Then I set this position to zero. I continued to spin the bit, and noted the total runout to be .015. You mention that I shouldn't use the bearing though? I thought that that would be the best place to try it as it is closest to where the actual milling of the wood will take place.

I have looked for burrs on the collet. None. (This in both the adapter and the actual collet. I've also tried a 1/2 inch bit without the adapter... still runs out)

The bit used in measuring was nearly new. I also tried another, with the same results.

There is no abnormal vibration or sound.

What I may do is bring it back to the store, along with my dial indicator.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Okay, now I'm feeling a tad bit foolish. Let me explain...

I found about 45 minutes in the shop today, and wanted to do a decorative edge on four boards needed for a project. I decided that I would use a simple chamfer. I took the v-groove bit out that was last used (it had produced a groove that wasn't as sharp as I would have expected at the bottom of this groove, but not too bad either... I believe the less than perfect point was caused by some runout). I took the adapter out and cleaned it up. I cleaned the collet out as well (some good advice from this forum).

I put the chamfer bit in, and by eye it looked good. I decided to check things out again with the dial indicator. On the collet tightening nut (again, the round part), I recorded next to no runout (on the unit I exchanged, it was around 0.005").

As I said, my time was limited, so I didn't have a chance to stick the ogee bit back in, and try again. So, I'm thinking that either the ogee bit is bent, or the collet had a small wood chip in it. At least at this point, I'm not condemming the router.

I do want to say though that the first unit I had deffintitely showed a runout at the collet nut.

I'll put some more thought into it, and try the ogee bit again. Now, if the bit is bent, could that have been caused by runout of the original machine... or vica-versa? Is there a danger of damaging the bearings on the router by using a bent bit? As I said, I don't hear any different sounds with it, or feel any vibrations.

Thanks to all so far who have helped clear up this bit of murkiness that I wouldn't otherwise know where to ask.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
aniceone2hold said:
There is a reason this router sells for $120 Canadian versus $350 US for a Porter Cable 3-1/4HP. It's called quality and YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR!
... And also why a fifteen pack of router bits sells for less than 50 simolians!

In a later post, aniceone2hold reports, "Let the buyer beware!" Well, received as a gift, I wasn't really aware! Not my point though.

What I want to say is that the ogee bit is indeed out of true. Actually, the cutting edges themselves are decent enough... it's the bearing on the end that is funky. And of course, when the router is mounted in a table, the bearing on the bit is the most obvious piece showing. I saw it wobbling, and grew concerned.

I was convinced when I brought back the original router that the shaft was bent.... am I still? Not as much as I was. It could have been a case of newbie over-concerns I suppose. Then again, my dial indicator doesn't lie.

As for runout measuring, I've seen another idea that may be of interest to others. It's actually really simple. All you have to do is clamp a piece (I used some scrap 1/4" ply) to the base plate so it is very close to the bit's shaft. Turn the router (by hand of course, Ed!) until the bit is as close to the piece as it will get. Now move the piece until it touches the bit. If, as you rotate the router, a gap forms between the bit and the clamped stock, that idicates rounout. It is easily enough measured with a simple (and cheap!) set of feeler gages.

There it is. I hope no-one is more confused after reading this!
 
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