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Hello,
I am new to the Forum. I would appreciate input regarding a good router fence.
I am an amateur woodworker. Your input is welcome.
Thank you.
 

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If you think about it, Richard, the fence is just a surface to guide the wood past the bit. But, there are a couple of criteria that must be there: it needs to be very straight, and it needs to have a face that is precisely square to the table surface.

My first router table was simply an old cutting board into which I inlet and attached a router. The fence was simply a jointed 2x4. It worked fine for simple edge-forming operations. I later "graduated" to an inexpensive (relatively speaking) Rockler table top and fence combo. The Rockler had a split fence - that is, the face was split, and mounted to a piece of anodized aluminum angle. As such, the outfeed side could be shimmed with plastic sheets for such things as using the router table as a small jointer. Not bad, but the aluminum angle wasn't very wide (or, thick), so it didn't provide a very solid base for taller face boards.

When I built my current table, I decided to make my own fence using 3"x3"x3/8" thick aluminum angle from a metals supplier. The faces of the angle had been machined to a precise 90° angle, so that gave a high level of precision for the fence, and the height and thickness provided a solid base for mounting MDF face pieces. I made two sets of face pieces - one set is 6" high, and the other is 12" high.

There are also commercially-made fences available, including the Incra "precision" models. Decide what you want the fence to do, and then use that as the basis for deciding which way to go.

 

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Hi Ralph

Do you still use the lift in your router table ? and what brand is it..

http://www.ralphbarkerphotography.com/archive/Woodworking/Router-Table101710-06LiftAdjuster.jpg

http://www.ralphbarkerphotography.com/archive/firearms/BerettaRugerSauer-600bw.jpg

Index of /archive/Woodworking

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If you think about it, Richard, the fence is just a surface to guide the wood past the bit. But, there are a couple of criteria that must be there: it needs to be very straight, and it needs to have a face that is precisely square to the table surface.

My first router table was simply an old cutting board into which I inlet and attached a router. The fence was simply a jointed 2x4. It worked fine for simple edge-forming operations. I later "graduated" to an inexpensive (relatively speaking) Rockler table top and fence combo. The Rockler had a split fence - that is, the face was split, and mounted to a piece of anodized aluminum angle. As such, the outfeed side could be shimmed with plastic sheets for such things as using the router table as a small jointer. Not bad, but the aluminum angle wasn't very wide (or, thick), so it didn't provide a very solid base for taller face boards.

When I built my current table, I decided to make my own fence using 3"x3"x3/8" thick aluminum angle from a metals supplier. The faces of the angle had been machined to a precise 90° angle, so that gave a high level of precision for the fence, and the height and thickness provided a solid base for mounting MDF face pieces. I made two sets of face pieces - one set is 6" high, and the other is 12" high.

There are also commercially-made fences available, including the Incra "precision" models. Decide what you want the fence to do, and then use that as the basis for deciding which way to go.
 

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Nice set up that is what my next one will kinda look like when I make a new and improved fence
 

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Hello,
I am new to the Forum. I would appreciate input regarding a good router fence.
I am an amateur woodworker. Your input is welcome.
Thank you.

Welcome to the forum, Richard
 

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Richard, there are many styles of fences and they all work. Some people prefer using a fence with t tracks and many attachments. My first fence was built from the plans in ShopNotes #1; this plan is available for download online for a modest fee. As you can see in the photo it is similar to the fence Ralph built, and it works just fine. Bob and Rick Rosendahl of TV's Router Workshop taught us to: "Keep it simple". When I was Senior Moderator Rick convinced me to try their methods and I will never go back. Clamping a fence to your table allows for infinite positioning and removes quickly for other set ups. It is easy to build specialty fences for specific jobs, and by doing so you add the ability to make angled cuts or easily rout complex cuts. There is no wrong choice when it comes to fences; use what makes the most sense to you... again they all work.
 

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I use the Bench Dog with a PC 7518 as well. love it, but am thinking of redoing my router table since the entire set up is very heavy. Used a Rockler table in in the extension of the Delta Contractor TS. Works, but room for improvement positively impacting ease of use, in feed length and precision.
 

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Ralph,
Your fence looks very solid. My need is doing light jointing on the router. The outfeed fence needs to move forward by the amount of material removed on the infeed. I don't necessarily remove an amount that corresponds to a shim I have on hand. That is why I want a fence that adjusts like a jointer. The Freud will do this but it doesn't look very sturdy. Any thoughts on this fence?
 

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Richard, I can't think of a good reason for an adjustable jointing fence. The purpose is to get a uniform edge to work from, and removing a uniform amount is all that is needed. Once you have this clean straight edge you will cut the other side to final dimensions. Simple is better; you can purchase a good jointing fence or build your own. Here is a link to the Router Workshop jointing fence from Oak Park:
Oak Park Enterprises Ltd.: Catalogue
 

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Ralph,
Your fence looks very solid. My need is doing light jointing on the router. The outfeed fence needs to move forward by the amount of material removed on the infeed. I don't necessarily remove an amount that corresponds to a shim I have on hand. That is why I want a fence that adjusts like a jointer. The Freud will do this but it doesn't look very sturdy. Any thoughts on this fence?
The outfeed table on a jointer has precision-machined races that keep the surface moving in a parallel direction. Doing that on a router-table fence would require the same level of precision to function properly. Adding a shim plate between the face and the support angle, and then adjusting the depth of cut to match is much simpler.
 

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Go to woodpecker.com and look for their Super Fence. I own this one and it will do what you want.
I also have the Woodpecker Super Fence and like my Ridgid Trim router, if they were the last ones on earth I would not sell either for less than several thousand dollars.
 

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Adjustable fence.

I just posted this picture on the jointer postings, but it will suit your purposes as well,I routed grooves in the top to take the guide rails fitted to the bottom of the fence platform, a couple of screw down buttons holds it in place. and allows adjustment , and a two piece fence means that you have no limitations, I made the fence very high to give my work support when using a Lock Mitre cutter.

Picture.jpg (289.0 KB)
 

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I'm designing my first table and am 'on the fence' about making a fence or buying one.

Has anyone looked at the Freud SH-5 fence? They are $99 on Amazon with free shipping. Is that fence overkill, or perfect for a newbie?

Thanks! And good luck on your endeavors!
 

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Hi Dave

You may want to read the reviews b/4 you buy that one . :( only the bad ones. 1,2,and 3 rating, most don't want to hear about the green lights just the red lights."down side"

Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Freud SH-5 Professional Micro-Adjustable Router Table Fence

Check out the one below, I'm sure it will make you a happy camper :)
Supreme Router Table Fence
Router Table Fence

Note ,,,if want or need a TALL fence you can just slide it in place with two tee bolts/nuts, quick and easy..

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I'm designing my first table and am 'on the fence' about making a fence or buying one.

Has anyone looked at the Freud SH-5 fence? They are $99 on Amazon with free shipping. Is that fence overkill, or perfect for a newbie?

Thanks! And good luck on your endeavors!
 

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Thanks, Bob.

Yours and the collective comments brings me back to my original goal of making my own, being economically low impact without sacrificing quality - I have started making components for a fence.

I realized from some of the comments that there is no need for anything more than perpendicularity to the table. The bits spin around and the fence is flat. You could have the fence at any angle and the only real concern about the fence positioning is the distance from the fence and the center (or edge) of the bit.

By the way: I've been tasked with learning Solid Works 3D modelling at work, which I am all for. But it is radically different from the 2D AutoCAD I've been using for years and the learning process was getting frustrating. Tutorials, shmutorials - it wasn't until I started designing a router table that I really started becoming rabid about learning the software.
 

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Dave, you can build an excellent fence from the router table plans in ShopNotes #1 which is available from Woodsmith and can be seen in action on the PBS show Woodsmith Shop. I built one of these and added Rocklers T-track and accessories as shown in photo's 1 & 2. Photo 3 is the Router Workshop table and fence which I use now. I much prefer the "Keep it simple" methods taught on the Router Workshop show.
 

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