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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's time for a new spoilboard so instead of MDF, I'm using a piece of Advantech flooring that I had leftover from my last remodel project. It's way stiffer and holds screws better than plywood or chipboard and definitely MDF so time will tell but so far it surfaced great and I've got high expectations but I've never seen anyone else using it so we'll see...
 

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Mike
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Looks good to me. Like you say time will tell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Also waterproof, so humidity swelling should not be an issue. I think it will prove a good decision.
Well, that was the main reason for this decision. My top layer of MDF would change shape sometimes multiple times a day. It was screwed instead of glued to the bottom layer but I wanted it to be easily replaceable. I think this will be better.
Funny David! Maybe I can use a sharpie and get my warranty back???
It's raining and the shop doors are open and the spoilboard is still as straight as a Harbor Freight straight edge!! 😉 My Z accuracy is gonna be a welcome improvement.
 

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It sounds like a great idea, Joe. I never thought of Advantech, even though I've used it and can attest to it's stability and resistance to moisture. And I'm glad to hear that it surfaced OK. Thanks!
 

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David - Machinist in wood
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I don't do any remodeling or use material like that, so without doing any searches yet I have to ask is Advantech flooring is just a brand of OSB flooring? I'm heading to Lowe's later and I can look at OSB flooring there unless Advantech flooring is different (they may have Advantech for all I know...).

David
 

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Mike
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I don't do any remodeling or use material like that, so without doing any searches yet I have to ask is Advantech flooring is just a brand of OSB flooring? I'm heading to Lowe's later and I can look at OSB flooring there unless Advantech flooring is different (they may have Advantech for all I know...).

David
Here is a link to find dealers near you David https://www.huberwood.com/locations

Also Lowes here carries it in all the store, I tried the link I sent and several local lumber yards have it.
 
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is Advantech flooring is just a brand of OSB flooring?
brand name of T&G subfloor decking
 

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I don't do any remodeling or use material like that, so without doing any searches yet I have to ask is Advantech flooring is just a brand of OSB flooring? I'm heading to Lowe's later and I can look at OSB flooring there unless Advantech flooring is different (they may have Advantech for all I know...).

David
Yes, it's more expensive, but worth it I think. The big advantage of Advantech is it's water resistance. When I was having a house built, the framer soaked a piece of OSB and a piece of Advantech in a bucket of water overnight to test it. After they had both dried for a couple of days, the osb was toast, but the advantech was still good. That sold me on it.
 

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Seems to be heavier and smoother than other OSB brands I have seen, and is more expensive. I had not thought of using it as a spoilboard, humidity not much of any issue where I am. I rarely need to replace or resurface my spoilboard, since I always use 1/8 hardboard as a sacrificial spacer when doing through cuts (a replacement sheet of 1/8” hardboard is cheaper and a LOT lighter than a sheet of 3/4 mdf).

I will probably try the advantech at my next replacement as well. The cost difference with mdf is not an issue because I do it so seldom, and don’t use vacuum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
I always use 1/8 hardboard as a sacrificial spacer when doing through cuts (a replacement sheet of 1/8” hardboard is cheaper and a LOT lighter than a sheet of 3/4 mdf).
This is a great forum!!!
Now that my spoilboard will stay flat,
I'll be posting a picture of my new (1/8" hardboard spoilboard protector) soon!! Thanks for the great info!!
 

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Quick question if it's OSB wouldn't have a better deflection rating (less deflection) then OSB and if the glue is water resistant shouldn't not expand like MDF does wen humidity changes. 'm really getting fed up with the expansion and contraction of the MDF I'm using for a spoil board. I'm thinking of trying this too.
 

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Mike
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I always use 1/8 hardboard as a sacrificial spacer when doing through cuts (a replacement sheet of 1/8” hardboard is cheaper and a LOT lighter than a sheet of 3/4 mdf).
I use 1/4" MDF panels under mine for cutting through and have several in different sizes for small to large jobs.

Of course, you can zero on your spoil board and then set your Z axis by adding the thickness for the material you use in your design file. That way you cut just to your spoil board but not into it. This also helps with inconsistencies in material thicknesses.
 
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David - Machinist in wood
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That's what I started doing, Mike, and it works so much better for most of the things I cut. Plus my spoilboard doesn't get near as 'spoiled' when I zero off the spoilboard.

David
 

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That's what I started doing, Mike, and it works so much better for most of the things I cut. Plus my spoilboard doesn't get near as 'spoiled' when I zero off the spoilboard.

David
If I started doing that I would have to change all of my files but when I get a new machine I will probably consider doing it, or just keep using 1/4" MDF and chunking it when it gets chewed up.
 

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David - Machinist in wood
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If I started doing that I would have to change all of my files but when I get a new machine I will probably consider doing it, or just keep using 1/4" MDF and chunking it when it gets chewed up.
I have developed a naming convention for my files and I start with 001 until the final file and I cut these in order.

In the case of a Longworth chuck, it's the actual diameter (in the example below that's 9.875 inch) followed by 'long' or long, short' depending on the slot style; zs means it's zeroed on the spoilboard or zt if I zero on the top of the piece; what this cut actually does in the process - finger holes (or whatever); cmp (if I use a compression bit); 0.245 bit or whatever the diameter of the bit is or if it's a number like 90 or 60 then that's the V-bit degree.

Writing it out like this makes it sound waaaaaay more trouble than it's worth but it's actually very quick and easy to use.

Text Font White Line Document


Text Font Line Number


In many cases, like the horse trivet, there are many steps and usually different zero points for different cuts and bits. Since I'm changing bits I have to set a new zero anyway so it doesn't matter to me if one cut is zs and the next is zt. I also have the file name in the description so I see it in the Mach4 G-code window for double checking that I'm using the correct bit and zeroing in the right place.

For reference, here's the horse trivet discussed above -
Emblem Wood Symbol Font Logo


This just makes it easy for me to tell at a glance when I load the file that I'll be using the correct bit and settings, especially if it's a file I haven't used in a few weeks or longer.

David
 

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Mike
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I do my file storage similar to yours David.

This is one for a two-sided project.

I have a project folder.
Inside that folder I have pictures of the project, and pictures of how it looks when cut (this project has options so 2 pictures for the cut) and a Toolpath folder (there are also pictures of the back cut but they had names so are not shown)
Inside the Toolpath folder are two folders, one for the Back (marked 1 so I know to do the back first) and one for the Front (marked 2 so I know to use them last)
Then in the 1_Back folder are the gcode files to cut the back and also a toolpath to cut alignment holes in the spoil board for when it is flipped over. The file names are preceded by the order they should be cut.
Then in the 2_Front folder are the gcode files to cut the front. This project has options for pocket numbers and they are number the same but have the OPT designation so you can choose the option to cut.

All the gcode files have the order number for when they should be cut, a short description of what they are for and the bit size and type.


I always stress the importance of getting an organized file storage system in place in the beginning because you can lose files or confuse files very easily. Find what works for you but do get organized in the beginning before things get out of control.
 

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