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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been doing small jobs with wood and have started to acquire some tools and a lot of interest in doing more wood working. I now have a porter cable circular saw, bosch 4100 table saw, bosch jig saw and bosch palm sander. We recently bought a house with a 12 x 14 shop so space is kind of limited as to having a cabinet style table saw and dedicated space for different pieces of equipment. Where should I go from here? Router? Miter saw?

I think router would be my guess, seeing as i have made it this far with out a miter saw (i've been using my speed square clamped as a guide for circular saw on long boards and table saw for smaller stuff). I would like to make a sled for my table saw along with some jigs to start doing different joints and get away from the torx deck screws for holding things together! I would also like to make a base for my table saw and get away from the rolling fold up that it sits on now. I would then like to make an outfeed table and my own router table with all being the same height to give me multiple uses from each.

So, which do you recommend, router or miter saw? or is there some stuff I need to do before getting any?

Also, I would like to get my table saw set up a little better such as a sled for such a small table, increasing the accuracy of the pusher thing with the degrees on it (what is that thing called again?)

Thanks in advance!
 

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Welcome to the forum.

Predictably, I will recommend a router.

And, yes IMO, a small sled is better than a miter gauge.... (unless you bite the bullet on a really good miter gauge - does your table saw have a proper 3/4" slot?)
 

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Start by reading the sticky threads at the top of each section of the forums. They are loaded with good information which will help you make your decision.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Welcome to the forum.

Predictably, I will recommend a router.

And, yes IMO, a small sled is better than a miter gauge.... (unless you bite the bullet on a really good miter gauge - does your table saw have a proper 3/4" slot?)
Thanks

Yes, it has 3/4" slots.
 

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Welcome to the forum KJ. I wouldn't do without my crosscut sled. I like the out feed table on my table saw too but I have the room for it. You could get by with out feed rollers which can be folded up and stowed out of the way when you don't need them. You could also use a router table for an out feed table too. You could then use the fence on the router table as an extension fence with your TS fence. You would just have to set your TS fence and then use a long straight edge to run your router fence up to it.

Since you have been doing okay without the miter saw, I would say router would be next. With a few edge profiling bits you can really dress your projects up. As you say, the TS can make good cuts with the right jigs and the speed square is good for the long stuff but if you don't have a fine tooth blade for the circular saw I would get one.
 

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I would say the miter saw and and a 12" one if you can afford it. You will find that the first tool you go to will be the table saw the second tool I go to is the miter saw. A router is a great tool but the wood needs to be cut to size before you take it to the router. Plus there will be far more things that need to be cut accurately to size then will need to be routed in any way shape or form. Days, weeks or months may go by without you ever turning the router on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Start by reading the sticky threads at the top of each section of the forums. They are loaded with good information which will help you make your decision.

Thanks Mike, I have read all of the stickies (noticing you wrote most of them:agree:) but still wanted to make sure I am going in the right direction.

So i am looking at the Bosch 1617evspk. I have had good luck with Bosch products so I will stick with em.

I spent 8 years as a machinist running vertical and horizontal mills, lathes, precision grinders and some CNC equipment and while doing so, put myself through school getting an industrial electricity associates degree and have been a mechanical/electrical technician for Mars food for the last 4 years. I have a pretty technical background and good grounds for building/machining. So now on to building a zero clearance insert and a sled for my table saw. Would the sled plans for these cabinet saws also work for my smaller portable bosch? And out of all the different plans is there one that just stands above all others for you? I know it has 3/4" slots. And also, a good table saw and circular saw blade that Lowes carries?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I would say the miter saw and and a 12" one if you can afford it. You will find that the first tool you go to will be the table saw the second tool I go to is the miter saw. A router is a great tool but the wood needs to be cut to size before you take it to the router. Plus there will be far more things that need to be cut accurately to size then will need to be routed in any way shape or form. Days, weeks or months may go by without you ever turning the router on.
But couldn't I clean up my circular saw cuts, create joints, and trim angles to correct degrees with the router? Please explain your reasoning a little more. I need a really good reason not to spend 200 on a router vs the 400 to 800 for a 12" dual bevel, sliding miter saw!
 

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KJ, if all you are planning on doing is installing trim then a miter saw is your priority. If you want to do woodworking a router is the way to go and the 1617EVSPK is a great place to start. Woodsmith just emailed out a very nice plan for building a table saw sled and it should be available for download on their site.

You do not need a sled for a router table, it is easy enough to guide off your fence.
 

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Hi Keith,

Just my opinion but you have 2 saws now and can use them for 80 to 90 percent of your needed cuts without adding any thing to them. I would go for the router so you will have more capabilities. I think your choice of routers is also a good choice.

As far as replacing your "pusher thing with the degrees on it" Look around and you will find plans and ideas for vary simple cheaply build sleds and also expensive to build sleds with all the bells and whistles. It will be your decision what kind you chose to build, maybe more than just 1, maybe several with specific uses and one that is adjustable.

What ever you go with let us see your projects, finished or in progress.

Work safe, Have fun, Cut some wood,
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So i won't need to scale these table saw sled plans (any plans, not just the onw mike mentioned from woodsmith) down any for my portable saw? They should all fit nicely on the saw without any issues?
 

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Kieth
Every shop need a good table saw,now if you are going to build large construction type jobs buy the miter saw, but if you plan on cabinets and furniture and crafts you will need a good router maybe more then one (one table and hand held) usually I find a project to build and to learn another technique on woodworking then buy the tools I need to build it.
If it was me I buy the router first but I am down the road you will want the miter saw
John. PS down the way you will own a lot of tools
 

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So i won't need to scale these table saw sled plans (any plans, not just the onw mike mentioned from woodsmith) down any for my portable saw? They should all fit nicely on the saw without any issues?
Keith,

You might have to adjust some of the dimensions for the sled plan you choose to fit your saw but it shouldn't be a problem once you get the plan and look at what the plan calls for. Most of the plans will let you know when a particular dimension is dependent on your particular saw's specs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Ok, router it is. I have been getting along ok with my larger construction type building with the two saws i have. I have lots of scrap pine and red oak to start fooling with too. Next question, most of these sleds i see built are being built with router tables and i see router tables being built with a router table too. So should i start by building a sled for the table saw or building a router table? And is it possible to do without the use of a existing router table? Also, any recommendations on good saw blades from lowes that i can fit my table saw and circular saw with?
 

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Ok, router it is. I have been getting along ok with my larger construction type building with the two saws i have. I have lots of scrap pine and red oak to start fooling with too. Next question, most of these sleds i see built are being built with router tables and i see router tables being built with a router table too. So should i start by building a sled for the table saw or building a router table? And is it possible to do without the use of a existing router table? Also, any recommendations on good saw blades from lowes that i can fit my table saw and circular saw with?
If you build a sled first you can use it to help build a router table. If you build a router table first you can use it to help build a sled.:haha:

The sled will be a smaller project so I would probably build the sled first while you think about what kind of router table you would like to build.

As far as saw blades go you need to look for a good rip blade, a good cross cut blade and a good combination blade. If you can only afford one blade right now get the combination blade. For the next blade you need to consider what you do the most of rip or crosscut. If you buy cheap blades they will dull quicker. Some of the cheap blades can't be resharpened where as a quality blade can be resharpened several times and often save you money in the long run.
 

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Keith, most of the time I leave a Freud Diablo red combination blade on my table saw. This is a 10" blade with 50 teeth and it has a 1/8" kerf. Priced around $40 this blade has cut many types of wood, plywood, high density particle board, 1/4" plastic and Formica cleanly. (Actually I use Freud's Diablo blades on all my saws)

The weather is starting to break here and I am going to try a new saw blade with similar specs: This one is from Guhdo-Gmaxx and it features a black proprietary coating. Guhdo-Gmaxx also produces a limited selection of router bits with this coating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Well i was hoping to pick one up at Lowe's after work. They carry CMT blades with an orange coating? Any input on them or any others that Lowe's carries? Wife and I just had a baby two weeks ago and if i have a saw blade shipped then she knows, if i pick it up at lowe's it goes straight in the shop!
 

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CMT makes very good cutting tools, as does Freud and Amana. Most say that Forrester make the best saw blades.
I didn't use a router to make my sled. I just cut a piece of hardwood 3/8 x 3/4 hardwood and screwed it to the bottom of a piece of ply. I did need the TS and the router to make the router table.
 

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