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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello everyone, i'm planning to buy my first plunge router for home use. I'm looking for an easy to hand use tool but also a suitable for router table use too. So I can use it one way or another.
According a router buying guide, a 1600w router is a good choice for power. So in that power and in my budget my options are not many.
I have found these routers:
Ryobi rrt 1600 k
and
ff group RO 1600 plus
And I can't decide which one to buy.
Can you help me, please?
 

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Welcome to the Forum. Glad you decided to join the fun. Assuming you live in the U.S., you will find it very hard to beat the Bosch 1617 EVSPK kit. The kit comes with both a fixed and a plunge base. You can mount the fixed base in your table and use the plunge base for freehand. In the U.S. Bosch has a terrific reputation for quality and customer service, and they are very good about supplying parts for older gear. Here's a picture of the router kit.
Product Camera accessory Microphone Audio equipment Cylinder

Bosch also makes a base with a key so you can make fine adjustments from above the table. It is part number RA1165. You set the rough height then use the key to set the exact height you want. The base is about $60. Most table inserts are pre drilled for the Bosch. Same holds true for many other name brand routers.

Machine Aluminium Metal Liquid Titanium
 

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Ross
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Welcome to the forum Chris.
 

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Hi Chris, assuming you are in Greece, your choices will be more limited than those in USA.

I would take the Ryobi in that case.

Cannot see "ff group RO 1600 plus " in Google search...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi Chris, assuming you are in Greece, your choices will be more limited than those in USA.

I would take the Ryobi in that case.

Cannot see "ff group RO 1600 plus " in Google search...
Thank you for your reply. The differences between Ryobi and ff group are these:
1)ryobi has the rpm wheel on the handle but ff group on the body. I don't know how useful is that and if it helps.
2)ff group can take 6/8/12 mm bits but i don't know if Ryobi takes 12mm it says 6/8
3) Ryobi vibration level is at 3.05 m/s but ff group at 7,78 m/s
is that bad or good? A high vibration level makes handling difficult? Or causes any other problem? For example it won't keep the settings of depth, or something?
Here is a link about the ff group ro 1600 plus:
 

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Whereever you are make sure you can find a table insert for the Ryobi. In the states there are very few inserts that fit off brand routers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Whereever you are make sure you can find a table insert for the Ryobi. In the states there are very few inserts that fit off brand routers.
Thank you for your reply. If you mean the metal plate, I don't think I can find one to buy in Greece. Probably I have to build one from scratch.
 

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A lot of different options. AlI I have are Craftsman routers. all 2hp, 2 1/4hp and 2 1/2hp. All have been trouble free. I have a 2 1/4hp on may router table. And have a 2 1/2hp on my table saw extension wing.
 

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Last time I put craftsman router under a table, must have been 25 years ago it burned the shaft up on top.

Craftsman router can be okay if your not counting on them, otherwise I would step up to a more professional brand..
 

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Last time I put craftsman router under a table, must have been 25 years ago it burned the shaft up on top.

Craftsman router can be okay if your not counting on them, otherwise I would step up to a more professional brand..
Sorry to hear you had troubles with the Craftsman router. I've been using the Craftsman routers for over ten years. They have more than paid for themselves. My neighbor has had his Craftsman router for about twenty years. Still runs good.
 

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Does 12mm bits fit on Ryobi rrt 1600 k?
12mm equals .47244 inches. I only have 1/4" and 1/2" collets for my router. So if I'm looking for a router bit, I would only be looking for those sizes, with 1/2" shaft preferred. The 12mm will fit a 1/2" collet. If you don't tighten down the collet, the bit could possibly loosen and have a problem digging farther in on your cut. Personally I've used 1/2" wrenches for 12mm bolts and vise versa with no issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
12mm equals .47244 inches. I only have 1/4" and 1/2" collets for my router. So if I'm looking for a router bit, I would only be looking for those sizes, with 1/2" shaft preferred. The 12mm will fit a 1/2" collet. If you don't tighten down the collet, the bit could possibly loosen and have a problem digging farther in on your cut. Personally I've used 1/2" wrenches for 12mm bolts and vise versa with no issues.
Thank you my friend
 

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Sorry to hear you had troubles with the Craftsman router. I've been using the Craftsman routers for over ten years. They have more than paid for themselves. My neighbor has had his Craftsman router for about twenty years. Still runs good.
I'm a little more demanding than the typical hobby shop when it comes to router work. My percentage of use is pretty high. I found the router was not designed to run upside down. Reason it failed..
 

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I'm a little more demanding than the typical hobby shop when it comes to router work. My percentage of use is pretty high. I found the router was not designed to run upside down. Reason it failed..
I too use a router quite a bit. The reason I have two router tables (a dedicated table and table saw with router extension wing) and a horizontal router table. I understand dust can get into the router and the router needs the dust blown out of it occasionally with routine maintenance.

To help clear out the dust, I run two different methods of dust collection at the same time on both the router table and with the router on the extension wing of the table saw. A six gallon shop vac with 1 1/4" hose at the dust port adapter at the router base and a second dust collector (with 660 cfm) with a 2 1/2" hose at the fence.

Most people seem to only have the dust collection at the fence. Instead of both the fence and router base. Dust collection to the fence with a T-adapter to the router base, doesn't have the same performance. And collection with a dust bucket under the table, does not the same dust collection performance verses at the router base.
 

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The one at the fence should be sufficient.
I started removing the router from the base whenever I'm done with a set-up and cleaning everything carefully. I have a hose connected to the exhaust port of my shop vac and use it to blow into the air intake on the bottom of the router to make sure there's no dust inside the router. Any y'all see a problem with that?
 
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