Router Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ok so I finally used my router today after mounting it up on the router table I bought. I would like to know if I have to take it off the table after use or can I leave it mounted until my next use???

I noticed most of my cuts mainly use the tip of the bit to do the cutting, that is the bit is 0.5"(diameter) and im using the whole 0.5" and the height at 0.25". So im only using the tip of the bit does this matter? OR should I change position of the fence to get 0.25"(from the diameter of 0.5") and increase the height to 0.5"?? I really dont want to get injured or break the bit and get injured lmao (*i was so freaking nervous on that first cut! lol first time so yea)

:moil:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
413 Posts
IMO it's safer to have the wood flat on the table. You are seldom going to use the entire bit in a situation like that, so you will get differential wear, but you can always get a bit sharpened, or buy a new one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
You can leave the router attached to the table until you need it for a hand held job.

As far as only using the tip. It all depends on the size of the cut you are making. If the desired cut is very small, you may only use a small section of the bit.
For instance, you may want to make a cut that is 3/16 wide and 1/16 deep. So you would have your bit sitting above the table surface 1/16 and the fence only allowing a cut 3/16 wide. Much smaller than the capacity of the bit.

On the other hand, you may want to make a groove that is 1/2 wide and 3/4 deep. You will need to cut the groove in several passes raising the bit a little with each pass. A lot depends on the type of wood you are using, the size and shape of the bit, and the horsepower of the router.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
337 Posts
Hi Rod,

Leaving the router mounted is common practice.

As far as your depth of cut goes, it depends upon what your desired result is.

You can adjust for varying depth and height to obtain many different results. As long as your bit is properly secured and the speed is adjusted for the task, you should have no problem cutting with only a portion of the bit.

Depending upon your router, bit and material it is routine to make mulitple passes while changing the depth, height or both between cuts. Sometimes it is a "must do".

It is a good thing to have a healthy respect for your power tools and some nervousness isn't a bad thing unless it has you shaking while making your cut.

Appropriate safety precautions should always be taken and they change depending upon the type of work you are doing.

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
ROUTER - Craftsman 17543 11 amp 2 hp Corded Fixed and Plunge Base Soft Start Router with Electronic Feedback

TABLE - Craftsman Router Table with Folding Legs and 24 x 14 in. Laminated MDF Work Surface

Well I am cutting 3"x1" pine. Making a rabbet along the end grains 1/2"deep(diameter of the bit) and 1/4"height of the bit above the table surface.

The first cut with the router the blade made no noise, I could only hear the router (max setting 25,000 rpm), the bit is 24,000rpm max(Problem?)... Next set of cuts I hear the blade cutting the wood(maybe I'm feeding it to fast?) but all the cuts came out clean no fuzz. So I was thinking it was how I was making the cut with the bit that caused the noise and maybe it was wrong...

At first I didn't attach a shop vac but after about 3 cuts, I had to get it. I'm glad the table allows for both the router and the vacuum to be turned on simultaneously.

Yes I'd rather have the wood flat to the table surface, but holding it flat against the fence seem like it could make a faster cut using more of the flute???

I want to make one of those jigs to hold the wood and push it through or buy one to keep my hands away from the bit. I have to research one later today :)

Thanks for the info. I'll leave the router mounted makes life easier :):dance3:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,494 Posts
Just make sure the router is not to heavy fir the insert plate but I think that table has the router mounted direct to table so Ya should be o.k. ...As stated earlier just make sure to take small about 1/8" cuts in each pass and should be fine... Good luck and soon You will be using the router on all kind of projects....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,046 Posts
ROUTER - Craftsman 17543 11 amp 2 hp Corded Fixed and Plunge Base Soft Start Router with Electronic Feedback

TABLE - Craftsman Router Table with Folding Legs and 24 x 14 in. Laminated MDF Work Surface

Well I am cutting 3"x1" pine. Making a rabbet along the end grains 1/2"deep(diameter of the bit) and 1/4"height of the bit above the table surface.

The first cut with the router the blade made no noise, I could only hear the router (max setting 25,000 rpm), the bit is 24,000rpm max(Problem?)... Next set of cuts I hear the blade cutting the wood(maybe I'm feeding it to fast?) but all the cuts came out clean no fuzz. So I was thinking it was how I was making the cut with the bit that caused the noise and maybe it was wrong...

At first I didn't attach a shop vac but after about 3 cuts, I had to get it. I'm glad the table allows for both the router and the vacuum to be turned on simultaneously.

Yes I'd rather have the wood flat to the table surface, but holding it flat against the fence seem like it could make a faster cut using more of the flute???

I want to make one of those jigs to hold the wood and push it through or buy one to keep my hands away from the bit. I have to research one later today :)

Thanks for the info. I'll leave the router mounted makes life easier :):dance3:
Hi Rod - I wouldn't think a 1/2" x 1/4" rabbet would be much of a problem for a single pass. As I understand it, you are doing the ends of the 1x3, how long? By holding flat against the fence, are you contemplating standing it on end?
I would suggest doing it flat on the table, but make yourself a fair sized (10"x10" approx) push block to help keep the stock square and keep your hands away from the bit. Sorry, I'm not at home so I can't include a pic but I'm pretty sure there is a pic in Bj's uploads. Mine is pretty much a clone. Doing cross cuts like that is a little tricky keeping it square. There are many coping sleds for sale to do just that job but a good push block is usually an adequate substitute.
Good Luck:)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,503 Posts
Rod,

I recommend running the wood flat when you can, not because it's unsafe running on edge but because it gives you a larger margin of safety.

In time you will find need, and make cuts, requiring the wood to be on edge (or end, like a drawer-lock but) but by then you'll be more comfortable using the router.

Even then I doubt many would choose to run the wood on edge just to get longer life from a bit. Well, except perhaps "Four Finger Bubba". :D

Seriously though, that's why they sell bits with cutter lengths from 1/2" (maybe some even less) to 3" and more. Its also why guys like BJ and Harry probably own most of a dozen lengths of cutters in the 1/2" size.

Oh yea.. maybe not for Harry... his are likely metric. :jester:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Hi Rod

It's not a big deal but here's some snapshots of the push block, I love routers and love to make jigs , to make the job safer and a bit easier.. :) I have my share of sleds and the push block puts most of them to shame...


By the way you can have to many router bits :) the long ones do come in handy.


=====



Hi Rod - I wouldn't think a 1/2" x 1/4" rabbet would be much of a problem for a single pass. As I understand it, you are doing the ends of the 1x3, how long? By holding flat against the fence, are you contemplating standing it on end?
I would suggest doing it flat on the table, but make yourself a fair sized (10"x10" approx) push block to help keep the stock square and keep your hands away from the bit. Sorry, I'm not at home so I can't include a pic but I'm pretty sure there is a pic in Bj's uploads. Mine is pretty much a clone. Doing cross cuts like that is a little tricky keeping it square. There are many coping sleds for sale to do just that job but a good push block is usually an adequate substitute.
Good Luck:)
 

Attachments

1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top