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I just purchased my first router - Chicago Electric plung router. Stupid me, I thew away the wrench for the collete (?) nut. Any suggestions on what I can use in place of this wrench? I haven't even used the router yet!
 

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Theo
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I have a wrench that fits, but have been known to use a crescent wrench on the rare occasion. Tight fit, and slow going, but works. I only did that when I couldn't find my router wrench, so now I have it hanging on a nail, and make sure I hang it up again when finished with it.
 

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put it back after you're done with it. There is the secret to a happy life! I have a long nut on my router table for the wrenches, the threads help keep a grip on the wrench.
 

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Welcome Cory. As stated, any wrench the right size works. It's either metric or Imperial but I would hedge a bet on it being metric.
 

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I do allot of metal work as well as wood work. I made a few thin offset wrenches for my router table. I cut them out of an old lawn mower blade with an acetylene torch and a hand grinder. I then hardened and tempered them by quench cooling in oil and heat treating. I would think harbor Freight customer service could help you out but if they can't you can always make one. If you measure the size of the nut find a wrench that is the right size. If the wrench is too thick just grind it to make it thin enough to fit take a little at a time and keep the wrench cool by quenching make sure it it doesn't start changing colors like to blue or brown that means the temper is coming out. Hope that helps and welcome to the forum.
 

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router srenches

I have just found the wrench that fit and ground it to the thin size I needed to fit. Thirty minutes at most. You can also use the older wrenches we used to use years ago to adjust valves on the old "L"Head motors. This was before overhead valves. They are very thin and work well. This kinda dates me, but they will work. Napa stores still carry some of these, I believe.
 

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Take it back and tell them there was no wrench with it. They take most stuff back 2-3 times. Personally, I'd get a refund and go buy a good router. Most everything at HF that has a motor or needs accurate measurements is a "don't touch".
 

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Theo
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I do allot of metal work as well as wood work. I made a few thin offset wrenches for my router table. I cut them out of an old lawn mower blade with an acetylene torch and a hand grinder. I then hardened and tempered them by quench cooling in oil and heat treating. I would think harbor Freight customer service could help you out but if they can't you can always make one. If you measure the size of the nut find a wrench that is the right size. If the wrench is too thick just grind it to make it thin enough to fit take a little at a time and keep the wrench cool by quenching make sure it it doesn't start changing colors like to blue or brown that means the temper is coming out. Hope that helps and welcome to the forum.
Cool. But with an old lawnmower blade not sure you'd need to harden and temper them. I think my router wrench is softer than one from a lawnmower blade. Be interesting to compare tho.
 

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Most everything at HF that has a motor or needs accurate measurements is a "don't touch".
Not so much as you might think. My bench drill press is something over 15 years old. Switch went within a week, Lowes had one for $5, and it has been working great ever since. HF angle grinder, still going strong after I don't know how many years. Had one or two more of those, but they seem to have walked off with my younger son. HF bench saw, at least as old as the drill press, still working. A LOT of my HF stuff disappeared with my son, long before I could break any of it.
 

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Theo After I cut the wrench out with the torch bending and grinding to the right shape it takes the temper out of the tool steel. I had to bring it back so it would not bend or be too hard to crack. My father worked at Xcelite tools making tools for many years.He taught me so many things about heat treating and working with metals. I wish I remembered half the things he tried to teach me.
 

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Theo After I cut the wrench out with the torch bending and grinding to the right shape it takes the temper out of the tool steel. I had to bring it back so it would not bend or be too hard to crack. My father worked at Xcelite tools making tools for many years.He taught me so many things about heat treating and working with metals. I wish I remembered half the things he tried to teach me.
Stoopid computer. Just ate everything I had typed.
Yeah, wasn't thinking about that. I don't have a torch, so would use an angle grinder, but on the other hand would probably use an angle grinder anyway. Ever watch Forged In Fire? One of my favorite shows. First time I ever used a forge was 1954-55. Made a nice chisel, and still have it somewhere. And it only took me 3-4 tries (or more) to temper it.
 
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