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I have a slight dilemma that I think my router might solve "IF" I can find the right bit(s) and I'm not crazy. I have a deck that needs some decking replaced. The new boards are slightly (maybe 1/16-1/8) too wide. I'm thinking that if I do a cut with a "rabbeting" bit that would take 1/16 of, then run a flush cut bit, I would trim 1/16. My question is, do they make such an animal? Working by myself so a router table isn't really and option on 16-18 ft boards and I don't have a place to store a router table if I buy one (yet).
I may be crazy thinking I can take such a small amount but thought I would ask.
 

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Well it could certainly be done with a router along the lines of what you are proposing. You could make a simple guide for your router and do it in one pass with the right bit. A table saw or circular saw would be much easier especially if you have very many boards.
 

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I don't have a clue how to guide a 16-18 ft board by myself and be accurate enough is why I was considering a guided bit for both operations. I can clamp to a solid structure to do the routing but will have to check for a local source for bits.
 

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A simple (and temporary) job site router table can be made with two sawhorses, a piece of plywood, two by fours and some clamps. On the outfeed side of the 2x4 "fence" use a spacer to accommodate the cut off made by the router bit as the wood passes through the bit. A little bit of red neck engineering but it will work.
 

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I have a slight dilemma that I think my router might solve "IF" I can find the right bit(s) and I'm not crazy. I have a deck that needs some decking replaced. The new boards are slightly (maybe 1/16-1/8) too wide. I'm thinking that if I do a cut with a "rabbeting" bit that would take 1/16 of, then run a flush cut bit, I would trim 1/16. My question is, do they make such an animal? Working by myself so a router table isn't really and option on 16-18 ft boards and I don't have a place to store a router table if I buy one (yet).
I may be crazy thinking I can take such a small amount but thought I would ask.
I agree with both Dan and Fire65. I would consider using either the TS or finger ripping them with possibly sanding a round over on the upper edge when they are finished.
I have a 7 foot run out table on the end of my table saw but 16 and 18 foot boards would be still a bit long to control alone.
David
 

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One other tool that is an option is a power planer. They'll take off 3/32 per pass so one to two passes will do it. They can be a very handy tool to have around because you often need to trim something to a wedge shape to fit (such as doors for example). A power planer makes quick work of that.
 

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The simplest approach is often the best - especially with exterior joinery - so I'm with Dan in Van; a circukar saw is going to be a lot less work and far, far faster
 

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If you don't have a tablesaw or a circular saw I suggest that you find somebody that does and will let you use it. Another option is to use an edge guide on the router, clamp the boards to 3 or 4 sawhorses with the edge of the board extended over the edge of the sawhorse and you are set to go.
 
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