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Wife is running the vacuum cleaner to clean out our electric heaters in anticipation of the cooler weather just around the corner. Will watch it later.
Harry, are you familiar with the saying that the Brits had during WW II about the Yanks? Over paid, over sexed, and over here!
G'day!
 

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Very weird hearing the australian pronunciation of EX - MOUTH.
Having lived for 30 years only 35 miles away from the original town in south devon UK, its pronounced EXMUTH (one word).

The American bases worldwide were built to USA spec to stop the military people from feeling homesick. I worked on many US and UK bases in my time.

One in the very south of England, on becoming a joint UK/USA base had the infrastructure built before the personnel arrived. First to be built was the Pizza restaurant.

There was a family centre and shop already on site. the americans could not cope with the English spelling of "centre" requesting it to be changed to "center". The UK commander stuck to his guns though, so after protracted arguments they renamed it a "facility".

We all knew who wore the trousers.
 

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I'm very familiar with that saying John! I grew up during WW11.
 

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When I saw the thread header, I thought Harry was going to complain about our Yankee visitors.....LOL.....

There are still many 'secret' US installations in Australia....
 

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Very weird hearing the australian pronunciation of EX - MOUTH.
Having lived for 30 years only 35 miles away from the original town in south devon UK, its pronounced EXMUTH (one word).
I've sometimes heard it said that Australians are "South Sea Yanks" while New Zealanders are "South Sea Poms". Having lived for a good many years in both countries I can see a lot of truth in this, in so many ways. That you would be unlikely to hear a Kiwi say "EX-MOUTH" is but one example. The two countries have a lot in common but they also have marked cultural differences. I love 'em both.
 

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I have enough trouble dealing with "american english".
Dont start another dictionary labelled "australian english", please.
OK, Bob, I won't. Suffice to say Aussie English is something of a hybrid, halfway between UK and American English. U.S. and Aussie each have a Labor Day holiday. Australia also has a Labor Party. New Zealand and UK both have Labour Partys (NZ's just yesterday announced a coalition agreement to form a government for the next three years) and NZ has a Labour Day holiday (next Monday, in fact).

I'm afraid I've taken the discussion off track somewhat!
 

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My wife has cousins in australia. I visited once.

We arrived in Sydney and got a bollocking from customs because one of our party had bought sweets with her. (Welcome to oz)
We went onto Cairns and couldnt swim because of the 1001 dangerous things in the water.
We went on to ayers rock to see the sunset. It rained.
We went back the next morning to see the sunrise. It rained. (NO, Mr.travel guide, its NOT lucky to see the rain, we just came from England!)
We went to board the plane at alice springs to go back to Sydney, two of our party got stopped for a drugs search (both are very respectable English old age pensioners).
After the drugs search we got to the boarding gate to be told "youre already on the plane and seated". WTF? How does that happen in a computer world?
We went out on the great barrier reef. The wind was ruffling the water so much i couldnt see a single fish and I was so sea sick I couldnt dive.
We went back to Sydney. Crossing the bay on the ferry, yup, it rained. Broke a 7 year drought (or so they told us).

Could have seen the rain without a 24,000 mile air plane ride and constant hassle from "officials".
How international am I?

(lol)
 

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I believe that this antenna was part of the "Onega Navigation System". An internet search of "Omega Navigation System" will bring up a bunch of information about it. The first station was built on Oahu, HI as a very low frequency communication system to communicate with the US Submarines in WWII, but was then converted into an Omega station after WWII when additional similar designed stations were built around the World to make up the Omega Navigation System. This system allowed ships, submarines, and aircraft the ability to determine their location anywhere in the World. The Omega System became obsolete when the GPS system, that we now have, became active.

In Oahu, on the East side of the island, long wire antennas about 3 miles in length were installed across the top rim of an extinct crater , with the transmitter building located below the antenna in the center of the crater floor. The building remains, but the antenna and building contents is now long gone.

Other locations that were added after WWII to form the Omega Navigation System each used huge vertical antennas. Each station broadcast a repeated pulse train similar in sound to Morse Code. A slight difference in the code identified which station the signal was coming from. Delays in the timing between the signals allowed sophisticated equipment on a ship or plane to determine it's location anywhere in the World within about 6 miles of accuracy. The new GPS systems that we have today will do this to well within 60 feet of accuracy and the military has equipment that can reduce this accuracy to just a few feet, when needed.

Also left behind in Oahu is the stairway up to the rim of the crater that was used by the military to maintain the antennas and a later added microwave link. It was originally a wooden stairway, but was replaced by "ship's Ladder" stairways when the wooden stairway began to fail. The "Ship's Ladders" are modular steel stairways with side railings that have adjustable metal steps so they can be set for just about any angle needed from almost level to just shy of vertical and then locked to that angle. Each assembly is about 10' long, and in this case, they are tied together end to end to form the long stairway all the way to the top of the crater, about 1300' above Sea Level. Because of the danger, the stairway has been closed to the public, but determined climbers continue to work their way around the gate and guard station and climb it anyway. Do a Youtube search for "Haiku Stairs" and you will see recent videos of hikers climbing them.

Those of you who watched the Magnum P. I. TV show back in the early 1980's, or who can still see it either on DVD or Kodi through their Amazon Fire TV converter can see the Oahu Omega Station and the Haiku stairs in the first year of production, episode 13 "J. Digger Doyle" with Erin Gray as the Guest Star. They filmed this episode back when the station was still active, so the interior of the station and antenna was still intact. In this episode, T C lands his helicopter on the top of the crater rim on a concrete pad, left over from an earlier antenna mounting point, and leaves Doyle and Magnum off to climb down the stairs to the station, in an effort to rescue Higgins from inside the station.

Graffitti Artists and Thieves have broken into the station and destroyed it in the years since it has been shut down. Some YouTube videos show it's present state as well.

So much for my "History Contribution" of today. It's all quite interesting to us electronic geeks like Harry and me, but I hope some of it will be of interest to the rest of you as well.

Charley
 

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A correction to my above post.

It was Magnum PI year one episode 17 that had the scenes involving the Omega Station on Oahu and not episode 13. Erin Gray was the co star and the episode was J Digger Doyle.. My memory is aging faster than the rest of me. Sorry for the incorrect episode number. I'm watching it right now on my Amazon Fire TV with the Kodi App installed. I rarely, if ever, watch regular broadcast TV anymore.

Harry - Here is a link describing the Oahu, HI station, when it was originally built, and how.
http://totakeresponsibility.blogspot.com/2012/09/haiku-valley-communications-and-stairway.html

Charley
 

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Thank you Charley for a great read.
 
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