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Do you think they will ever come out with an aftermarket Domino? I don't know when Festool brought out the Domino. I do not intend to buy one but still, I have been wondering "When".
 

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it was introduced in 2007...
 

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From Wiki: "Patent law is designed to encourage inventors to disclose their new technology to the world by offering the incentive of a limited-time monopoly on the technology. This limited-time term of patent is 20 years from the earliest patent application filing date (but this term can be extended via patent term adjustment). After the patent term expires, the new technology enters the public domain and is free for anyone to use." (US patent law)
 

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I have always though the Domino is a Festool designed tool and they did not buy it from anyone, as a method to do loose tenons then it works perfect but I have said about Festool tools in the past that you really need the work to justify buying them, there are other ways to do loose tenons if all you need to do is a few of them, if I had the work then I would be happy to buy one. I do know a person who did buy one and it sits in its box doing nothing much at all and I am more offended by that than I should be. Buy tools if you have to work and if you have a lot of work then buy the best tools you can. N
 

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Kind of like the Fein Oscillating Multi Tool. Original was kind of pricey. Once the patent expired everybody got into the game. Fein had to drop their price to stay competitive.
Lemmelo introduced the biscuit joiner. They went/go for Festool like prices.I don't know what the patent deal was but eventually everybody was making/selling then, even Ryobi and HF.

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Hi, Mycrossover; I encourage you to fill out something about yourself in your 'Profile', over on the left. It'd be great to at least have a name and a very general idea where you're from.
Just friendlier, that all.
 

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I'm really happy tool collectors exist. Yes, they do not have any justification for buying a tool, yes, the tools collect dust on a shelf. But buying tools because you love tools is a guilty pleasure at worst.

Remember, the tool collectors are important because they help keep prices down and production quantities up. Think about it, Woodpecker would be out of business, all their employees would be jobless, red tools would disappear, I mean, not a huge deal, but if they were out of business, we couldn't get those amazing email offers of tools that have almost zero relationship to accomplishing real work.

I guess I'd have to exempt the Woodpecker router plate and their wonderful (and overpriced) dial guage jig for setting up table saws.

High end tool collectors are all that stands between serious tool users and having to get by with only HF stuff. :wink:
 

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There's another category, one into which I fall...semi regretfully. The impulsive or unwise buyer.
I have more than my share of space wasting, dust gathering items. Thankfully, none of the red ones. Well, I do have a little red 2" square that was a gift. It does see use often. But, there are some tools, gadgets, actually, that have seen very little use. I keep thinking (hoping) that one day maybe, I'll put them to regular use. Be nice to see a little ROI.
 

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Just ran onto this YouTube video. A great alternative to dominoes and pocket screws.
 

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Dowels and using doweling for joints is pretty old technique, but plan on sanding and planing to even out the irregularities, especially if you use your hand to hold the jig down. One dowel is not going to hold up as well as a 2 inch long conventional M&T or a joint made with a Domino or the Rockler jig. Lining up the home-made doweling jig to make something like the Domino or Rockler multi-dowel joint is going to be very tricky and exacting. The Rockler approach accounts for that so long as you clamp it down. I did notice that the guy in the video had a domino, and I'd bet 10 bucks he uses it rather than his shop made doweling jig for making serious joints. BTW, Rockler makes a jig just like his, which is quite accurate.

But accurate joints of any kind require that you joint and planer your stock flat and straight, otherwise, get out your sander.
 

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One dowel is not going to hold up as well as a 2 inch long conventional M&T or a joint made with a Domino
Tom someone posted on a thread about different types of joinery a few years ago a video of an amateur woodworker testing various joint types for strength. Although not a scientist in a testing lab, his methods were reasonably sound. He took either a hydraulic or pneumatic ram and attached a pressure gauge to it and then used to the ram to see how much pressure applied to the ram it took to destroy various joints. Obviously butt joints, biscuits, and pocket screws took the least pressure. But surprisingly, dowels were not very far behind M & T joints. I guess really not all that surprising since a dowel in two holes is for all practical purposes a type of floating M & T joint. If you approximate the amount of dowel to equal the size of tenon in a specific situation and use good wood for the dowel(s) then it probably won't make enough difference to matter. And it's much easier to use dowels than it is to make M & Ts. The trick with dowels is to precisely line up both holes and a good jig does that.
 
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Dowels, biscuits, splines or dominos...makes no difference, at least to me. The use of either simply aids in alignment of edge joints. But then, big dining tables are not in my wheelhouse. My use of edge joints is limited to coffee table sized, or smaller, work. Consequently, strength of the joints are of secondary consideration. Today's glues used on well mated edges result in joints that will not fail in normal use.
I hate mis aligned edge glued boards. Too much extra work and time. Dowels...or splines make life so much easier. And dowels are the least expensive in time and money.
As an aside, Windsor chairs are 99% comprised of dowel joints. Well made ones last a looong time.
 

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I use these to make my own drilling jigs: Bushings and Inserts - Lee Valley Tools I have 4 inserts and 4 each of 1/4", 5/16", and 3/8". A total investment of $50 down there and $65 here. I haven't used them to make a drawer front jig for drilling the hardware holes yet, mostly because I normally just machine in finger pulls with a router. If I did more drawer front handles I'd probably get a couple of 3/16" ones.

You can make any drilling jig you want with these, from jigs to drill dowel holes for center dividers in cabinets to shelf pin jigs if you want.
 
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Drill bushings were the backbone of production in the aircraft industry at one time. I too have a bunch of Lee valley bushings, and I like that I can screw the different sizes into the main bushing. they are very versatile. They also give the advantage of aligning the drill bit perpendicular to the work piece.
Herb
 
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