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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently acquired a very old table saw. It is quite a monster, I assume that it was originally supposed to be placed in one spot and not moved around, but some previous owner built a "transportable" base for it so it could be rolled around. The top is about 3/8 inch steel and weighs in at 120 pounds. It has a side extension that is 50 pounds. The saw mechanism is about 30 pounds.

It was in pretty bad condition when I got it and I am attempting to restore it to a good operating condition. The prior owner was about to send it to the garbage heap and I couldn't let that happen.

I disassembled the saw and then set about cleaning and refurbishing the parts.

I spent about a week removing rust from the top plates and sanding them smooth. I have the motor (I doubt it is original) being check out by a repair facility. It is a 3450 RPM, 2 HP Dayton induction motor.

I have only been able to find 4 part/casting numbers. Top Plate 55003, Extension plate 55004, Lifting/tilting part 18T4 Arbor Assembly 18T5 (The number might be 12T4 and 12T5)

So now to the point of where I am seeking information and assistance: When I removed the two bolts from the arbor assembly, they seemed to have an oil on them but the cylinder didn't seem to have oil in it. I wonder if it is supposed to have oil? The outer saw blade washer slides off the shaft but not the inner one. I wonder if it is rusted on or if it is a pressed fit.

If anyone has some knowledge of this old saw, I would appreciate any assistance.

Thanks.
 

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monkeywards TS from the 50's were made that way...
 

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Hey, Eldon; welcome!
If it's any further help, there is a vintage tool website that a few members have mentioned in the past. Looks like a pretty decent hunk of metal, not what one might call flimsy.
How much does it weigh?

VintageMachinery.org | Welcome

....I thought Stick was joking about the "monkey ward" reference; turns out that's what you guys South of 49 call Montgomery Ward. Something like our 'Crappy Tire' but I'm guessing better(?).
 

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I appears to have ball bearings on the arbor, and the arbor washer nearest the bearing is supposed to be fixed,(not easily removable).

A picture of the whole saw would be nice, to help identify the brand.

It is not ancient, just old.
Looks to me like maybe a pre WWII , just guessing, does it have a green finish?

What voltage is the motor?

What size blade? 8" ?

It is a contractors saw.

Herb
 

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....I thought Stick was joking about the "monkey ward" reference; turns out that's what you guys South of 49 call Montgomery Ward. Something like our 'Crappy Tire' but I'm guessing better(?).
yur right,,,
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Here is the only assembled picture I have, the base that it is on is not original to the saw. I weighed the parts individually (except the motor and stand) and they are just under 300 pounds. The saw was loaded into my truck with a fork lift and I had to disassembled it to remove it from the truck.

Stick, thanks for the MW angle and DaninVan for the vintage machine reference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Here are some more images,

First a picture of the business part of the assembly sitting upside down on the top (it is not blue, the silver just looks blue in the light)
Next two are of it sitting right side up on my work bench
4th pic is of the rotation system
Finally, a picture of the underside of the top

My most important question is whether or not the arbor assembly was oil filled or if it just has sealed bearings

Again, thanks for all the help
 

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Here is the only assembled picture I have, the base that it is on is not original to the saw. I weighed the parts individually (except the motor and stand) and they are just under 300 pounds. The saw was loaded into my truck with a fork lift and I had to disassembled it to remove it from the truck.

Stick, thanks for the MW angle and DaninVan for the vintage machine reference.
Looks like the old Craftsman I had.

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I searched the vintage site based upon your feedback (Montgomery Wards (which my dad always referred to as MonkeyWards also), Craftsman, etc.

Unfortunately most of the pictures are of the tops and don't show the guts of the saw.

Nevertheless, the biggest differences from what I have and what I found are, the way the motor mounts (left belt vrs right belt), the shape of the top (square corners vrs rounded corners) and extension (solid vrs webbed).

The other big difference I found was in the lift and tilt mechanism.

I also searched ebay for trunnions hoping to find some that closely resembled mine but no luck.
 

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I don't think it is a MW, none of the homeowner TS I have ever seen have a double belt drive. And a good point about the drive being on the left, which means the motor was running counter clockwise. If that is the original motor, it has a dust cover over the fan, which I have never seen on a homeowners saw.

As far as the arbor being an oil bath type, I would say not. It has sealed BB bearings. The lubricant might be dried up now after all these years, but replacing the bearings might be a priority.
Herb
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The mystery has been solved. It seems to be a Davis and Wells assembly, circa 1950. The most telling point was the way the motor mounted and the lift mechanism.

I will definitely rebuild the arbor assembly before I put it back together.

Thanks to all for your help.
 
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