Router Forums banner
41 - 54 of 54 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Hope everyone had an enjoyable Christmas holiday! Time to get back to the build.

Spindle Mounting Issues

As you may remember from one of my earlier posts (#20 & #23), the spindle I purchased came with a mounting bracket, and quite a mounting bracket it is! Weighing in at over 2 pounds this is an impressive hunk of metal. However, try as I might, and in consultation with some other knowledgeable folks it was determined that this mount would not work out for my build. So, I searched the net and found what I considered a suitable replacement and ordered it. Here is a pic of the bracket that came with the spindle:

Wood Bumper Office supplies Machine tool Gas


The new bracket arrived this past week. Unfortunately, using this new bracket is not going to be as straightforward as I anticipated. The biggest obstacle is the interference with the roller mounting screws. These screws protrude past the rollers and lock nuts 3.7 mm and interfere with anything bolted to the Z-axis 2060 that extends past the 60 mm footprint.


Material property Machine tool Creative arts Gas Wood


If I shortened the roller attachments crews from 65 mm to 60 mm there would not be sufficient penetration into the lock nut.

I had purchased a 12” square of 3/16” (4.7 mm) Type 6061 aluminum plate which I was going to use in order to fabricate an adapter to use with the original spindle mounting bracket. As I mentioned previously, the screws protrude 3.7 mm past the lock nut. By attaching the new mounting bracket to a spacer plate fabricated from the 3/16” stock we can achieve 1 mm clearance between the new spindle mounting bracket and the protruding roller mounting screws.

Now 1 mm is not very much, so I plan to place a 1mm washer under the head of each roller mounting screw. There is plenty of clearance in back of the mounting plate to facilitate this. The result will be to reduce the protrusion to 2.7 mm, and provide clearance of 2 mm between the screws and the spindle mounting bracket. Or…………

I can simply take out my Dremel, attach a cutoff wheel, and cut the bolt protrusion flush with the nut. Always a very good possibility.

Here is a drawing of the spacer I intend to use sandwiched between the Z-axis 2060 rail and the spindle mounting bracket. Notice that the spindle mounting bracket and spacer are attached to the Z-axis rail with the 5 mm dia. screws.

Rectangle Slope Font Parallel Handwriting

Finally, there is one other issue that needs to be addressed. The Z-axis rail in my router is 60 mm wide. The new spindle mounting bracket that I just purchased can be used for both 60 mm wide and 80 mm wide rails, but……….

When you bolt on the right angle corner brackets using the 60 mm mounting holes, the corner brackets protrude into the spindle opening. I will have to grind or mill off a portion of the corner bracket in order to fit the spindle into the bracket opening.

Light Automotive tire Wood Gas Auto part


As it turned out, I spent about 15 minutes with a half-round bastard file and the spindle slipped right into the hole.



Automotive tire Wood Rim Gas Automotive wheel system

White Automotive tire Light Rim Audio equipment
Gas Cylinder Machine Engineering Nickel
Gas Machine Engineering Cylinder Metal
White Automotive tire Light Rim Audio equipment
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Woo! Yoo!

I have my DB25 cable from the controller to the main electrical cabinet checked out and no problems.

Next, I made up a 4-conductor cable to go from the main electrical panel to each individual stepper motor. Now for the moment of truth.:rolleyes:

I connected the X-axis cable to the X-axis motor using a 4-position terminal strip. I powered up the main electrical cabinet, reset the hand held controller, set the mode to MPG and rotated the MPG wheel. Yeah! The X-axis motor moves. I then changed modes to step and the X-axis motor moved one step each time I pressed the controller button. Finally I switched the mode to CONT and pressed the X- axis button and the motor ran as long as I kept the button pressed. Worked in the opposite direction as well.

I repeated the process with the Z-axis. Here I had to be a bit careful because I only had about 1/2" of travel due to the bloody screws sticking out. (See my previous post). Yet again I experienced great results in all three modes.

Moving on to the Y-axis, I repeated the same procedure, only this time there was no movement of the Y-axis motors. Time for some troubleshooting, but not tonight. I am dead tired after fighting with lasers all day. Should not be a difficult problem to solve.

By the way, is it possible to post videos?

Wood Gas Flooring Electrical wiring Hardwood
Circuit component Hardware programmer Audio equipment Electronic component Computer hardware
Wood Engineering Machine Flooring Bumper
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
that is great progress, you gotta love it when things move, correctly!
remember to terminate and ground the shields at the controller box end, and not at the other end. if you already knew that, sorry.
thanks for posting your build.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
477 Posts
remember to terminate and ground the shields at the controller box end, and not at the other end. if you already knew that, sorry.
Not a thing wrong with some sage advice! Better to remind everyone, whether you know or not to prevent future mishaps. Should it happen eventually... well you'll learn a lesson.

Looking forward to the video AlbertZ

When you going to take orders :geek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #47 ·
Hope everyone had an enjoyable, healthy and safe New Year Holiday.

With that being said, let's get back to the business of building a CNC router. Recall from my previous post that I had the X-axis and Z-axis working in all three modes.
  • Continuous
  • Pulse
  • MPG
However, the Y-axis motors would not operate in either of the three modes.

I have a handy little DMM that has the capability to display waveforms (what wont they think of next?). I checked the pulse output for the X and Z axes and sure enough I got a pulse waveform. I was lokking for something resembling a square wave or trapezoidal pulse, but hey, as the paramedic said, "I got a pulse".

Ah, but there is no pulse signal on the Y-axis when measured at the terminal board. I checked the Y-axis pulse terminal in the RMHV3.1 controller, and the controller was doing its thing generating a pulse. I checked the continuity all the way back to the terminal board in the main electrical cabinet. That is where I was losing my signal!

I pulled the wire out of the terminal block and checked for pulse. Yes! It's there!

All of the signal wires going into the terminal distribution blocks are 22 AWG. 22 AWG is the threshold for reliable contact.

My solution was to put ferrules on all of the signal leads going into the terminal distribution blocks. I now have control of all three axes through the RMHV3.1 controller. :giggle:

Meanwhile other things are happening with spindle mount modifications which I will detail in a subsequent post.

Albert
Gadget Font Audio equipment Electric blue Display device
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Electrical wiring Optical fiber cable Gas
Gas Font Electrical wiring Auto part Electrical supply
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Been under the weather the past few days – just wanted to stay in bed, stay warm and sleep. Finally got back to the shop last night and got some mechanical work done and a bit of wiring in the electrical cabinet.

Recall back in Post #41 I discussed some of the spindle mounting issues that I was experiencing. Basically, the new spindle mounting bracket that I had purchased was hitting the roller mounting screws. What I needed was an adapter plate in order to mount the spindle mounting bracket to the Z-axis rail.

I procured a piece of 3/16: aluminum plate and cut out an adapter on an Axiom Auto Route Pro+ B18 using Vectric 2D software. I got the part home and found out I had a problem. The spacing of the gaps in the Z-axis rail are 40 mm center-to-center. I assumed the spacing of the holes on the right-angle mounting brackets would also be 40 mm center-to-center. Wrong! The holes were 42 mm center-to-center and resulted in the screws hitting the sides of the mounting holes.


Wood Gas Composite material Hardwood Wood stain
Light Purple Lighting Liquid Jig grinder
Table Wood Rectangle Grey Tree


Rather than bastardize the mounting bracket, I trudged back to our maker space and cut a new adapter plate with the correct hole spacing and I made the plate a bit shorter and narrower. The holes for mounting the spindle bracket were drilled and tapped for M5 screws. The three holes at the top and bottom of the plate were drilled to 5.5 mm. Then I got sick.

After regaining my strength, I went down to the shop and attached the spindle mounting bracket to the adapter plate using four M5 x 10 mm screws. Then this sub-assembly was attached to the Z-axis rail using six M5 x 10 mm screws. Finally, I inserted the spindle into the mounting bracket and tightened it down. I didn’t take time to get everything perfectly plumb because I was anxious to see how the NEMA 23 stepper motor would handle the load. I energized the electrical cabinet and ran the spindle up and down using the controller and the MGP. The motor handled the load without breaking a sweat. Everything looks good except those screws are only 1 mm away from the mounting plate as you can see in the photos.


Machine tool Milling Gas Machine Auto part
Automotive tire Bumper Camera accessory Gas Cameras & optics
Wood Gas Machine Fixture Machine tool


I was on a roll so I decided to install the pulleys on the Y-axis and X-axis motors and proceed with the GT3 belt installation. It was here that I ran into another problem. The GT3 belt is secured at each end of the rail sliding the belt under a T-nut and clamping down with a 5 mm screw. This assumes that you have room under the T-nut to slide in the belt. This only works if you have flat T-nuts. I prefer to use machined T-nuts which have more thread and provide more secure attachment when mounting to the rails. However, they don’t work so well when you want to use them to clamp down the ends of the timing belt. I ordered some flat T-nuts from McMaster Carr which will be delivered on Tuesday. That will finish up the mechanical assembly.
Light Black Automotive exterior Gas Bumper

Wood Automotive exterior Publication Aluminium Metal
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #49 ·
I mis-spoke! I ordered the flat T-nuts from Amazon and they were delivered today!

I installed and secured the timing belt on the X-axis and gave it a quick test. The motor missed steps and stalled if I kept pressing the button. Not good. I went into the controller and found that the pulses per unit was set at 1260. I kept backing that down until the speed was roughly where I wanted it and the motor was running smooth. I set it at 80 pulses per unit and did the same for the Y-axis. I set the Z-axis to 320 pulses per unit and that gives just about the right speed. Later when everything is assembled, I will calibrate the axes and set these parameters so that they are spot on.

Tomorrow I will enlist the aid of my grandson and try to shoot some video of everything in motion.

Below is a shot of the waveform on the X-axis with the pulses per unit set at 1260. Note that each increment on the horizontal (time) axis is 5 microseconds.
Rectangle Font Slope Screenshot Parallel


The next picture shows the waveform with the pulse per unit set at 80. We have a nice clean square wave with just a bit of noise superimposed. That should clean up when I finish wiring up all the grounds.

Gadget Audio equipment Oscilloscope Display device Font


I am a very happy camper! :giggle:


Automotive tire Rim Bicycle part Machine Automotive wheel system
Wood Stairs Automotive exterior Bumper Rim
Gas Machine tool Machine Engineering Audio equipment
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #50 ·
Just a quick update this evening............

I had used 4-pin aircraft connectors to run cable to the stepper motors. What I completely overlooked was how to tie the shields to ground back at the electrical panel. I could have run an external wire tied to the shield back into the panel, but that would have looked like crap, although electrically feasible. Instead, I ordered some 5-pin connectors, and I am in the process of converting from 4-pin to 5-pin and bringing the grounds inside the cabinet in this manner.

Meanwhile I ordered some limit switches with integral switch bounce elimination circuitry. Trying to figure out how to mount them.

Finally, it occurred to me that in my last post I kept referencing a specific page in my controller that most of you would have no idea what I was talking about. So here is a pic of the specific page where you can set up the motor parameters.

Personal computer Font Line Display device Gadget


Meanwhile, I am trying to figure out what post-processor this controller uses that is compatible with Vectric V-carve.
I would like to shoot a video with the machine actually executing a profile without the spindle and bit.

AZ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
Meanwhile I ordered some limit switches with integral switch bounce elimination circuitry. Trying to figure out how to mount them.
not sure which type you ordered, but you want to mount them such that if the switch/circuitry were to fail, the switch does not get smashed. seen it happen too many times, bad design.

its great to see the use of an oscope. had one tied to my hip for 19 years. looking for a used 2 channel, have to recap an old stereo receiver. that 1052 looks nice...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #53 ·
I feel like Jethro Bodine after he finished repairing a car. He was left wondering why he had all these extra parts left over. It turns out that I had two X-shaped pieces left over and couldn't seem to figure out what they were for. I'm not sure if I mentioned this, but the kit did NOT come with instructions nor was there one available online. However, I did find a set of instructions online for the OX router and that is what I used. Unfortunately, nowhere was the installation of the X-pieces mentioned.

I went back to the vendor from whom I purchased the kit and perused photos of the finished builds. That is how I figured out the purpose for these parts. They are to reinforce the gantry assembly and take the cantilever load off of the rollers. This allows the load on the rollers to be distributed evenly.

Starting with one side I removed the nuts securing the rollers. Then, keeping pressure on the bearing assembly, I removed the shorter screw and inserted a longer 45 mm screw. Then I slipped a 6 mm spacer over the longer screw. I did this for all seven rollers. Then I slipped the X-piece over the screws and replaced the locking nuts. I repeated the process for the other side. The result is that it stiffened up the gantry considerably. The only slop remaining in the entire assembly is in the Z-axis. I'll discuss this in a subsequent post.

The attached photos will give you a pretty good idea of what I am talking about here.

Does anyone remember "The Beverly Hillbillies"



Bicycle part Bumper Wood Automotive exterior Auto part
Wood Bumper Automotive exterior Gas Electronic instrument
Wood Bumper Automotive exterior Automotive tire Bicycle part
Bicycle part Bumper Automotive exterior Rim Wood
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #54 ·
It's about time I checked out the spindle operation. But before I get into that, let's review the power distribution on my build. First, we look at the 110 VAC power distribution. The wiring schema is shown below:
Rectangle Slope Font Parallel Handwriting

You will see that power supply PS3 energizes a contactor coil located on the VFD panel. So, when the 110 VAC is switched on the contactor energizes and the 220 VAC to the VFD is also switched on.

Next, here is the wiring schema for the 220 VAC panel. Without wiring the interface to the RMHV3.1 controller, we should be able to manually operate the spindle.
Slope Rectangle Parallel Font Diagram

Here is a photo of the 220 VAC panel:
Circuit component Electricity Electrical wiring Electronic engineering Hardware programmer


The connection to the spindle motor is at the far right side of the panel (nothing plugged in yet).

After carefully checking all the wiring connections, I hooked up everything except the signal wires to the RMHV3.1 controller. I wanted to see if I could manually control the speed of the spindle motor.

You can see the results on this U-tube video.

 
41 - 54 of 54 Posts
Top