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I'm new to all this so please bare with me. I have a new router and it was making sparks from within the motor housing. So far, I have discovered that this is normal. My other two concerns are: Is it common to break the inside of the collet, which holds the router bit? and Is it best to move the router slow or fast?
 

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Welcome to the forum.

What make/model router are you using?

On some collets, the sleeve inside may be removed. Can you post a photo of your broken collet? (you can post a photo that is on your PC - not a link to a hosting site)

Slow or fast - depends on many factors (type of wood, bit size, depth of cut....)

too slow and the wood may burn, too fast and the router may be overworked..

just my 2 cents worth........
 

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I agree with James speed is determined by alot of factors. I have an idea in my head where mine routs best with some of the wood I use most of the time.. One thing I do is always make a practice run on some scrap piece or section Ya will be cutting off to determine speeds, I also make my practice run shallow as I do most of my routing usually 1/8"- to no more than 1/4" a pass ... Good Luck and happy sawdust makin
 

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I'm new to all this so please bare with me. I have a new router and it was making sparks from within the motor housing. So far, I have discovered that this is normal. My other two concerns are: Is it common to break the inside of the collet, which holds the router bit? and Is it best to move the router slow or fast?
Hi - Welcome to the forum:)
Yeah, some sparking is normal in a new router until the brushes get seated, sparking accompanied by smoke is a bit more of a concern.
Not sure what you mean by "break the inside of the collet". Breaking anything is certainly not a good thing. Collets in most newer routers really consist of the collet itself and the collet nut. The collet itself is a cone shaped thingy with slots partially up the sides and a hole through the center for the shank of the bit. On most newer routers, the collet is a snap fit into the collet nut with the nut acting as a retainer. This snap fit allows the nut to extract the collet from the armature shaft preventing the collet itself from being jammed in there. If the collet/nut assembly has been tightened in the router with no bit installed, it is possible that the collet compressed itself enough to release from the nut. Pics of the situation would be great.
As far as feed rate goes, what James and Warren said:)
 

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Good reply, that is the best way to learn. I agree with both of your replies, they do determin the type of wood you chose and always run a sample piece beforehand. If you got sparks coming from the router itself, you do have a problem. Who ever told you that is normal, needs to check themself. That is not right.
 

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I agree with John and what cb0811 has "discovered" as sparks being normal. I may not be a router expert, but I've used MANY power tools in my 52 years, and if it's not normal for power tools to spark -- a little bit at least, and in it's beginning of use, then i've have owned/used nothing but abnormal power tools. I haven't noticed my new router sparking (but I use it in a well lit shop, or outside) but my 30 or so year old Craftsman router sparks a little till this day, when I first start it. Just sayin'....
 
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