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go w/ Roku...
I have and one pay for one add on subscription...
Curiosity Stream...
way better than Amazon and it doesn't phone home like Amazon does...
[B][I][U]https://www.roku.com/[/U][/I][/B]

I have that exact antenna...
you can have it if want it...
I was a waste of money...

map the broadcast antennas..
site map youself to them...
consult what antenna ya really need...
https://www.channelmaster.com/Antenna-Selection-a/134.htm
https://www.techhive.com/article/3214772/tv-antenna/which-tv-antenna-should-i-buy.html
 

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We have grandkids who use the internet for all their video and TV watching. They see stuff we never get to see. Roku and Curiosity Stream sounds just right. I love documentaries. Made nontheatrical 16mm films with a partner for about 5 years in my early years. Lit, shot, edited, the whole shebang, had a Moviola in my bedroom. My partner did the audio and was the sales guy. Video is a much easier medium compared to film, you only need a fraction of the light that film required.

I've tried "special" antenna before and they never help.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Stick; We already have a 4k TV ie 'streaming' enabled, and hardwired to our modem/router. The issue is I want to get rid or our TV Cable service but I still want access to our broadcast channels; can't get live local news on the internet function. That's pretty much it.
ROKU can't (?) give us that.

This is the latest I could find:
https://globalnews.ca/live/bc/
All the Big Boys have online news but it's not really current.
 

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Roku has current streaming news channels...
 

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I have been investigating these options for some time. I tried two of these cable elimator antennas that are supposed to pick up local stations over 50 miles. I live in town but it is a low spot. My old tv tower is 50’ tall. I could use it, but getting too old to climb. Put the new antenna at 15’. Can only watch maybe 5 stations and another 5 which are for kids.
For two TVs I have been using Amazon Firestick. My wife and I like to watch movies based on true stories. Have found many to watch. I also cancelled the Netflix.
Still have cable but have cut landline and reduced number of tvs on cable. If I would get rid of the western channel, I could reduce my cable bill by another $20. Have a western app on the firestick. Will be making a decision on this option soon.
My word of advise is to be sure you can get the cable channels you want. What they tell you in their ads is not always what you get. Local terrain and distance from source affect reception.

Frank
 

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We us the Amazon Fire stick, and, an app called Mobdro for live TV. All through the internet. We can't even get cable out here. For years, we used Directv. We saved gobs of $$ when we quit them.
 

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@stick

Ruku link is bad

https://www.roku.com/
gives you this:

This site can’t be reached %3Cb%3E%3Ci%3E%3Cu%3Ehttps’s server IP address could not be found.
Search Google for <b><i><u>https roku u>< i><
ERR_NAME_NOT_RESOLVED

or this:

Warning
The request contains an invalid URL!

just letting you know

smitty
 

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If you have a Fire stick or a PlayBox or an Android box or a Roku or a smart tv even just a plain old a computer then you can install a program called Kodi and get everything and I mean everything. You do need internet access and unless you have a very strong wifi you should be hooked up directly to the router (and not your Bosch router!) :) . To see what I am talking about type in Kodi on YouTube. To get live local TV is a little more difficult because you have to search for the right program but it's available.
 

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I have been investigating these options for some time. I tried two of these cable elimator antennas that are supposed to pick up local stations over 50 miles. I live in town but it is a low spot. My old tv tower is 50’ tall. I could use it, but getting too old to climb. Put the new antenna at 15’. Can only watch maybe 5 stations and another 5 which are for kids.
For two TVs I have been using Amazon Firestick. My wife and I like to watch movies based on true stories. Have found many to watch. I also cancelled the Netflix.
Still have cable but have cut landline and reduced number of tvs on cable. If I would get rid of the western channel, I could reduce my cable bill by another $20. Have a western app on the firestick. Will be making a decision on this option soon.
My word of advise is to be sure you can get the cable channels you want. What they tell you in their ads is not always what you get. Local terrain and distance from source affect reception.

Frank
Frank, I also like the old westerns on the Western Channel but we got rid of it anyway. We found two channels that have a lot of old westerns. Number 1 is INSP and the other is Grit. They have commercials but what the heck, I don't have to pay a premium for them.
 

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If you have a Fire stick or a PlayBox or an Android box or a Roku or a smart tv even just a plain old a computer then you can install a program called Kodi and get everything and I mean everything. You do need internet access and unless you have a very strong wifi you should be hooked up directly to the router (and not your Bosch router!) :) . To see what I am talking about type in Kodi on YouTube. To get live local TV is a little more difficult because you have to search for the right program but it's available.
I jail broke my firestick and use Kodi myself. I would highly recommend that you use a VPN with it so there are no prying eyes on you. I use Nord VPN .You can do anything you want with kodi just a learning curve. Do a search on youtube tons of info out there. Have fun!! If you want an antenna for local news it depends on how far you are from a city with programing and there towers. I am far from any large cities. I use a bowtie like this and a rotor https://www.amazon.com/Xtreme-Signal-HDB8X-Bowtie-Antenna/dp/B00CX6UJ5K?SubscriptionId=AKIAILSHYYTFIVPWUY6Q&tag=duckduckgo-d-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B00CX6UJ5K and an RF amplifier like this https://www.amazon.com/Winegard-LNA-200-Preamplifier-Antenna-Amplifier/dp/B00DQN3R9O/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1546267394&sr=8-4&keywords=tv+amplifier
 

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Lucky that I'm in a fairly good location. I get a lot of channels on antenna here. Most local channels are so easy to get you could use rabbit ears. Getting the Buffalo channels is a little more challenging. Most of the time they come in but the weather occasionally affects them for me. The picture quality is much better than the "old days" transmissions. The main channels usually broadcast in 1080i and many channels have extra channels that are usually 640x480 (like DVD and old TVs). On those I get oldies TV shows (which I like better than many new shows). I get 3 PBS channels out of Buffalo with woodworking, this old house and travel programs. Their main channel has Nova and other interesting shows.

Keep in mind that you can try(use) an antenna and cable. Then decide if you want to lose the cable. A UHF antenna is around C$40 to C$80 (around here) so it isn't a big expense to try. Once you hook an antenna up, you just have to go to your TV settings and do a channel scan including 'antenna' in the scan. I've used TV Fool to get an idea which stations are available from my area. I think that their data may be a little out of date now but still very helpful. I aim my antenna for Buffalo and the strong local channels(Toronto) come in perfect even though I'm aimed away from them.
 

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I got rid of DirectTV and went the Over the Air route. I have an amplified receiver that will convert a digital signal to analog if your TV is an older analog unit. I have used it on both systems and it works great. We have 2 of them and one uses rabbit ear type antenna and the other uses a powered rotatable antenna. We get 78 channels where we are located. About half of those are Spanish or other languages. We are on the East side of Dallas, Texas and get Dallas and a few Fort Worth channels. We have problems with weather every once and a while but usually only happens for one or two minutes and usually only if there is really heavy rain. We also have satellite internet and have a special video download/watching package from them. I do have Amazon Prime so I can also watch the movies they provide for free.

The most important thing to consider when you want to go with over the air TV is your proximity to the broadcasters. If you are not close to a major city then you might not have much of a choice for channels. Really depends on what you want to watch.
 
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Discussion Starter #17
*Gloom*

:frown:...I talked to my neighbour last night. He's recently retired from his job as the local cable co. technical mgr.
His advice was 'don't waste my money, the channel I want isn't receivable due to the North Shore mtns. blocking line-of-sight transmissions from the tower on Mt. Seymour.'
I'd probably get Victoria and maybe Bellingham, but that's about it. All the local (Vancouver) channels use the same transmission site.
I'll try some of your suggestions instead.
 

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There are several websites that will give you a plot of TV transmitters with the potential to reach your location. For example, this should link to a search for my local area:

http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id=90380385d9fc79

One advantage of this website is that it takes terrain into account by showing a "heat map" of the relative signal strength in your area. For example, looking at station WPXW-DT, I can see two mountain ranges (at least what they call mountains in the eastern US) and I am right in the middle between them. Blanked out by the deep purple RF shadow of the first set of hills.

There are similar websites for FM radio transmitters.

One disadvantage of most of these is that they get their data from the US FCC. That means they only show US stations. Just for fun I entered Vancouver BC in one of the search sites. Apparently, the only station receivable there is in Bellinham WA. I know that's not right because I've been to Vancouver a few times, back when I was working for a living.

Also, for outdoor antennas, ignore the hype about being digital TV ready. They all are, because the stations transmit on the same VHF and UHF channels as they always did. The biggest consideration is that the antenna has enough elements to give the needed "reception range". And if you are out of "line of sight" to the antenna, an indoor one is probably not suitable.



-Graeme-
Sent using Tapatalk while wondering what router to take
 

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I've never had cable or satellite. I've never wanted to subscribe to either and have to pay for what is mostly something I would never watch. I live on a hill overlooking Lake Ontario and before digital I just had a VHF and a small UHF antenna hanging in my attic. Several years ago when digital came along I got a couple of bow tie heads similar to those in Roxannes post. I paid $25. for each. I took a galvanized fence rail (like those you see across the top of a residential chain link fence, mounted it securely to my chimney, fastened the heads to it and pointed them in different directions. One is aimed across the lake in the direction of Buffalo. The other toward Toronto and beyond eastward. In total I get about 40 stations. The odd one goes missing on a really bad day but I can live with that. I get several from Buffalo, Erie, Pennsylvania and more from across upstate New York. Those in Toronto and Hamilton (I'm between those cities) are always available. About 80% of the time I get a signal from Barrie which is about 70 kms. northeast of me up on Lake Simcoe.

A couple of years ago I bought an Android box with wifi to my computer router and that gives me a ton of other stuff. In this part of the country doing it this way is called FTA, free to air. The big guys are steamed over it. For a time I had a receiver that with a special "card" and a couple of small satellite dishes I got all of Direct TV's offerings. Literally hundreds of stations across the U.S. That was called the grey market. The phone company is currently offering a package. Phone, internet and fibe t.v. for $90 a month.

I might just update my little antennas.
 
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