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my older brother, housebound and a constant computer user, has finally had enough of windows 10, and wants a simpler system that actually does what its told, rather than doing what it wants.
He mainly works with pictures (photoshop, etc.)
he has heard about linux, but doesnt know if he can download and use it by himself.
Anybody know?

(I'm clinging desperatly to my xp tower and vista laptop till the bitter end)
 

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Linux runs my CNC machine. I've had no problems with it so far. It's almost like using Windows. I knew nothing about it when I got it, but was easy to operate.

HJ

I won't even get Windows 10
 

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my older brother, housebound and a constant computer user, has finally had enough of windows 10, and wants a simpler system that actually does what its told, rather than doing what it wants.
He mainly works with pictures (photoshop, etc.)
he has heard about linux, but doesnt know if he can download and use it by himself.
Anybody know?

(I'm clinging desperatly to my xp tower and vista laptop till the bitter end)
I've got Linux Mint. I can run just about any program that Windows can run.

Gimp is very close to Photoshop I understand. I don't do much photo work.

leon
kc0iv
 

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Check out "Puppy Linux" It can be loaded on a CD, and you can run it without changing ANYTHING on you computer. Most Linux distributions require installation on your machine, Puppy stays only on the CD, unless you decide to install it permanently.

The only thing you need to do, after downloading it and burning it to CD (or DVD), is open your bios at boot up, and change the boot order.

If you aren't familiar with that, the boot order just tells the machine wherefore look for the operating system.

If you change it to look on CD first, it will boot from the CD (if there is a bootable CD in the drive). Leave your hard drive as 2nd choice. This way, when you want to use Linux, put CD in drive, and reboot. If you want to run Windows, don't put it in the CD drive. If you leave another CD, or DVD in the drive, it will ignore it, and boot up off your hard drive (windows)

The huge benefit to Puppy Linux is that you don't need to commit to Linux, you can use it until you think you are comfortable with Linux, and want to make a permanent install. You will probably find it to be all you need. The larger distributions have the same Linux, they just include their own choice of other programs. If you need a program that isn't on the Puppy distribution, you can add it as needed.
 

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If you like Windows XP then I would suggest Linux Mint Mate Edition,and if you like Windows Vista, then try Linux Mint Cinnamon Edition. Ubuntu is a lot like Windows 10. If you have a 64 bit computer, be sure to get the 64 bit version. All of Linux Mint versions are free as well as all of the software. Linux is rather sparse as far as games though.
They do have near to 70,000 software packages.
 

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I recommend Linux mint.After it's installed there's a video on YouTube -search for "Frank's help desk" for how to set it up!
 

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I dual boot Linux Mint on my old XP computer. It takes a while to get it set up the way you want it, but if you are the least bit computer literate it isn't difficult at all. I simply went to the Linux Mint web site and downloaded the OS, burned it to CD and installed with the dual boot option. The Linux system does it all for you. If a 72 year old, semi-computer-literate can do it...
I use the GIMP program on Linux for photo/image editing, but I also have an old Photoshop version loaded with the Wine loader program. There are a lot of Windows programs that can be run on Linux using the Wine loader program
 

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Windows 7 is pretty reasonable I think. I used to run Linux but found I got bogged down with tweaking things.
 

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I've switched to 10 and hated it at first but have come to like it. Yeah, lots of little things are different but it fixes a lot of problems. What I hate is they push that d*mn store.

As to Linux - I question whether your brother will like it at all. It's completely different. I grew up on Bell Labs Unix so it's kind of second nature to me but to the average Windows user, it's like a serbo-martian dialect.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
He's reached the age where he is struggling to learn new things. i told him not to go to 7, again not to go to 8, and told him he was a fool to go to 10, but he believes the adverts, and wants everything to be simpler. Instead of which he cant use photoshop anymore, and is almost on the point of being unable to even store his pics.

I've sent him the puppy linux link, its up to him now. I think he's hinting at me setting it up for him, but I'm 2000 miles away and NOT an expert, so he's fresh out of luck there.
 

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I'll pass these suggestions on to him. He's also 72, and has had computers for a long time, but 10 has absolutely beaten him.
I'm 72 also. There is no way I'll ever run Windows again. My tablets run nicely with Android, laptop crashed and I still run Ubuntu on it. I still have 3 towers running on XP that will get converted over to Gnome or Ububtu when the XP runs out.
 

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Absolutely! I been using Linux since the command line beginnings. Currently I am running a custom version based on Mint. My "day" job is all Linux/AIX servers, I do middleware support for a large corporation. I have nothing against Windows, in fact I made a living for 15 years supporting Windows users in a corporate environment, if it was not for Windows I would have been flipping burgers and asking "DO you want fries with that" LOL...
 

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I'm 72 also. There is no way I'll ever run Windows again. My tablets run nicely with Android, laptop crashed and I still run Ubuntu on it. I still have 3 towers running on XP that will get converted over to Gnome or Ububtu when the XP runs out.
Have your XP drives cloned so you have an exact duplicate of the main drive. Put the new drive in and keep the old one so you can use it if the clone fails. Power supplies and hard drives are the big failure points. Power supplies warn about failures by causing unwanted shut downs. They are really easy to replace.

Heat is another problem. Vacuum out the dust from your XP units from time to time, and you can add an auxiliary fan to improve air flow. Some computer boxes have space to put a small filter in the openings for air intake, which will cut down on dust. Make sure you vacuum the fins on the main chip and you can also re apply the goop between the CPU and cooling fins to improve heat dissipation. Computers can last a very long time.

Make sure you have an up to date XP compatible anti virus installed. You can buy multiple licenses for Norton and install it with automatic updates on all your machines. Set up the annual renewal and relax.

I'm an XP fan. Still the best business oriented OS Micro$oft has produced.
 

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I use Linux every day in my day job, and I've used Linux since 1997. Ubuntu is a great place to start. The bottom line is if you don't like it, you can always try another Linux distribution ("distro")...nothing lost but your own time. He can definitely download Ubuntu, or many of the other distros mentioned here, and try it out.

HOWEVER, if photoshop is a critical app, his real only other choice is a Mac. I really like the Mac, and I promise, I'm not a fanatic :) Photoshop was originally developed for just the Mac, and there really isn't a good photoshop replacement for Linux. Gimp is the only viable Linux replacement for photoshop, but it's like re-learning photoshop, which is a huge task on it's own. I'm no master at photoshop, but gimp is like a whole other universe.

I sympathize with your brother. I actually feel helpless when using Windows, but I also understand I'm the minority. It's just not intuitive at all to me. And I can't stand the constant virus issues. In theory a Mac (or even Linux) is just as vulnerable to viruses, especially with recent versions of Windows, but in practice, it's simply not an issue on a Mac or Linux.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
right, this is getting silly, he's now asked me which version to load, and I am boggled by the multitude of systems all called linux. This is supposed to make life easier for him, and its now panicked him as to which one to download.

Just how much computer knowledge do you need to run linux? Its looking to me that I wouldnt do it, and I;m a lot more adventurous than he is>
 

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Bob

I too supported Windows in a corporate environment - I also run a MAC at home, as well as Windows 10. Lastly I received certification in supporting Novell's SUSE Enterprise Servers (another version of "linux")

Now, to your question - all flavors of "linux" are basically the same, and all versions can be run "like" windows, that means no real need to learn commands.
Most people who try "linux" usually start with UBUNTU. As has been said, some versions can be run from a CD/DVD, or in a dual-boot environment, or installed. But the bottom line is there are a ton of versions out there and most are free, so he could try a couple to get a feel for them and see which one he likes.

As far as a replacement for Photoshop, I found GIMP to be a pain to learn. But, it depends on what he is using Photoshop for. I do a lot of photography and editing on my photos and I still use Nikon's software, ViewNX and CaptureNX2. However, Nikon stopped developing that software so I switched to Lightroom. My wife, who also holds a Photography certificate (we both received our certificates from the college we worked at) uses Photoshop and couldn't wrap her head around Lightroom. So, again, it really depends on what he's using Photoshop for.
 

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Bob, Linux doesn't sound like a good idea for him. I'm probably old school and my information a bit dated, but I wouldn't recommend Linux unless
- he currently relies on, and even enjoys, internet searches (Google) to learn how to use computer features and fix issues.
- he's comfortable using the command line (or command prompt) on Windows, more than just knowing that it exists somewhere in the menus.

The Linux graphical user interfaces available work for most tasks, but IMHO, are still pretty basic. But I only use a small fraction of the GUI, and again, I'm old school.
 
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