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Discussion Starter #1
Getting ready to install shoe molding in the living room. My garage is full of stuff ready for the move so tool access may be a problem.

I was just going to use the RAS or the table saw with a miter gauge. The latter could get fussy with longer pieces.

I still mark the wall and floor side of the molding. I never seem to be able to keep track sometimes.

I have a simple miter box but no 22.5 degree slot. Tempted to go get one that does. Simple and you cut it as you see it.

Any tips or tricks like cutting backwards and upside down? Jigs for holding the molding in such a fashion?
 

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miter the OS corners...
cope the IS corners...
use a back saw w/ a miter box...
cheap and a very handy addition to the tool arsenal...
power tools may be too much... the RAS destructive...

 

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Using a brad nailer takes away the pain of trying to use a hammer on inside corners. For best results you can pre drill with a small bit.
 

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Getting ready to install shoe molding in the living room.......

I have a simple miter box but no 22.5 degree slot. Tempted to go get one that does. Simple and you cut it as you see it.

Any tips or tricks like cutting backwards and upside down? Jigs for holding the molding in such a fashion?
Why 22-1/2°? The cut before coping a joint is typically made at 45° - unless you're planning to scarf joint sections to get longer pieces. A simple miter box like Stick shows can be easily modified to add another angle - doesn't matter if the angle is exact as you'll cut mating pieces with the same slot but with the pieces on different sides of the miter box. The downside is that one piece will be in the "correct" position (vertical surface flat against the inside face of the miter box) but the mating part will have the rounded toe against the face of the miter box - not a problem as these are typically smallish mouldings, you should be able to hold it in place with your hand while cutting.

Tom
 

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Make your own miter box,very simple 2 sides and a bottom.
Lay out the 45deg. both ways and a 22.5 deg. both ways and cut them with the saw you are going to use. Make 2 boxes if you want one for each cut.
Have a 90deg. cut on one of them or use the end of the box for your 90's.
A pull saw makes an excellent miter saw, or a carpenter's handsaw, 10pt. or 12pt.
Backsaw is best if you have one.
use a coping saw to cope the inside corner, or make a coping jig for router table, like Gafboat Oliver did here on the forum.
Splice your long runs on a 45deg.
Brad nailers are great for running trim.
If the trim is going to be painted, pre prime or paint before you install it. you will be glad you did.
 

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What Stick said.
Learning to cope inside corners is key - takes a while to learn but once you've got it figured out, works a charm. Practice on a few test pieces until it comes natural. Crown molding requires you to think upside down
Have your overlap on inside corners facing away from the traffic areas - that makes them less obvious. Hope that makes sense.
Same goes for scarf joints where required.

Sneak up on the finished length - you can always remove more material but you can't put any back on. :)

Brad nailer is a must - especially when working alone - and you don't have three hands.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Why 22-1/2°?

Tom
Just the way the wall bumps out and how the corners are done in this contemporary home.

I am in a hurry, of course, and could not find a miter box with 22 1/2 degrees miter. Making one seems the most expedient method to solve this but with the garage in chaos for the move, not as fast a solution as one would hope. But, something I need to put on my jig list. I do have a back saw and several brad nailers. Reminds me to turn down the regulator.

I think I will just do the 22 1/2 on the table saw with the EB-3.

Coping not necessary, this is shoe molding. Simple 45 and 22.5 angles, inside and out.
 

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you have 45° corners???
 
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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
you have 45° corners???
Yep!!!!

Think about it. Chamfer a corner. You no longer have two mouldings with 45 degree ends. you now have three mouldings. Each with 22.5 bevels.
 

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you have round round then...
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)

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from past recent experience...brad nailer for sure...beats the old PITA finish nail & nail set method, chop saw w/fine tooth blade or Stick's mitre box method for small pieces.

Prime & paint, or stain & finish first, touch up/putty stick after as needed...although looks like you have prefinished laminate shoe, so no worry...

Wood glue (no nail) those itty bitty 22.5* pieces in place...
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Wood glue (no nail) those itty bitty 22.5* pieces in place...
Good idea. Otherwise I have to drill and hope they do not split.
 

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Use a hand wood miter

If I am not coping the trim, I always use a hand held molding miter. Looks like an over sized scissors with a wide wicked carbide blade. A small plate is mounted on the bottom to cut against and it has marking for various angles. check example at Amazon: search for Crain-Carpet-Wood-Miter-855

Fast and easy (when sharp) and you don't have to get up and down to cut all those small pieces.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
If I am not coping the trim, I always use a hand held molding miter. Looks like an over sized scissors with a wide wicked carbide blade. A small plate is mounted on the bottom to cut against and it has marking for various angles. check example at Amazon: search for Crain-Carpet-Wood-Miter-855

Fast and easy (when sharp) and you don't have to get up and down to cut all those small pieces.
Just not having to run in and out of the garage should be worth its weight in gold. But, for $40 including Prime 2 day shipment, done.

We will see how it performs. Good reviews for the laminate trim I am using.

Thanks. The best tip of the day.:grin:

 

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Good idea. Otherwise I have to drill and hope they do not split.
construction adhesive...
will stick to to about anything but water or oil, flexible, fills gaps and won't break loose...
I like the PL series and really don't care for Liquid nails...

note n the miter shear..
Lowe's has a similar tool that takes a razor knife blade that you can shave w/...
large and small set for 20 bucks..
quality curved pruning shears work well too...
 

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Two things, first make sure you are using shoe molding and not 1/4 round it is much easier to work with and looks better, not as bulky. Second make your own with your router it's a fraction of the cost and I mean a fraction. Start with a wide board, route the edge, cut the molding off and route the next piece and so on. You can use common grade because there is enough clear material to get the long pieces and when you run into a knot you just cut the good wood out and use it for the shorter pieces.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Two things, first make sure you are using shoe molding and not 1/4 round it is much easier to work with and looks better, not as bulky. Second make your own with your router it's a fraction of the cost and I mean a fraction. Start with a wide board, route the edge, cut the molding off and route the next piece and so on. You can use common grade because there is enough clear material to get the long pieces and when you run into a knot you just cut the good wood out and use it for the shorter pieces.
I bought matching Vermont maple shoe molding from Quick Step. No priming, no painting, no caulking, and no shop time making it.

I am moving and this room once held my salt water reef aquarium. I installed the floors AFTER the aquarium was established. I had this flooring and molding stored for years, just for this occasion.

My buddy is enjoying my coral reef and I am not looking forward to moving it again any time soon. I may just have to visit his house to see my fish and corals in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
If I am not coping the trim, I always use a hand held molding miter. Looks like an over sized scissors with a wide wicked carbide blade. A small plate is mounted on the bottom to cut against and it has marking for various angles. check example at Amazon: search for Crain-Carpet-Wood-Miter-855

Fast and easy (when sharp) and you don't have to get up and down to cut all those small pieces.
Got them in the mail. Hope to give them a go tomorrow. Product Review to follow!:laugh2:
 
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