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A local sawyer, specializing in slab work, has a 60" version embedded in a large rock at the entry to his road. Quite an eye-catcher.
 

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What is it used for? Years ago there used to be a lot of small sawmills around my area and the majority of them ran a 52" blade with 3/8" kerf. All of them are out of business now and the large sawmills would be cutting a maximum 3/16" kerf. Those 52" blades were probably around 150 lbs, maybe as much as 200. I helped take them off the mandrels a few times and you made sure you had a good grip on it when you started lifting.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What is it used for? Years ago there used to be a lot of small sawmills around my area and the majority of them ran a 52" blade with 3/8" kerf. All of them are out of business now and the large sawmills would be cutting a maximum 3/16" kerf. Those 52" blades were probably around 150 lbs, maybe as much as 200. I helped take them off the mandrels a few times and you made sure you had a good grip on it when you started lifting.
I'm sure its for cutting logs in some shape or form. We still have quite a few mills in this area. I work for a company that makes all kinds of automation machines, and equipment for the lumber industry.

Every time you go in Home Depot, or Lowes and you see that nice neat bundled and wrapped stack of plywood up on the rack, that's most likely done on one of our machines.
 

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Yeah, I would say cutting logs too. All the modern sawmills use bandsaws for cutting boards, so that's about all that would be left for a circular saw blade like that.

I remember when I was a kid, my uncle using a buzzsaw to cut firewood to length. Belt driven, powered by a tractor - they used to have a round wheel on the side specifically to power belt driven machines. VERY scary machine. I don't know if there was another name for that type of saw, all I ever heard anyone call them was buzzsaw.

Looked and found a video on one, just like the ones I saw when I was a kid. They still make them today, except they are driven by the PTO on tractors. And, supposedly the proper name is 'cordwood saw'. Still buzzsaw to me.
 
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