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Discussion Starter #1
I am in the process of starting to apply veneer to MDF. I will be using Cherry veneer that is wood backed. I've always like a contact cement for this application. But I want to do it in my basement shop and I'm concered about the odors. So I heard from another wood worker that you could use Titebond II. Apply two coats to each piece (substrate and veneer) Once they are dry, put the two together and apply an iron. This will bond the two.

I tried this on a scrap piece and it worked quite well. Has anyone attempted this? Is there any secret to get it to work correctly? Does dry time of the glue matter before the two pieces get put together?

Is there any reason that I should look at thinning the Titebond II? Could I just apply with a small roller?

Thanks!
 

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Hi s7horton

It's hard to beat a true and tried way of doing it by using contact cement, as you know the key is to get it to stick quick without any air pockets and using a roller to get it flat and without the need of clamps to hold it down.

Titebond II is great stuff BUT it's not contact cement and you may need to clamp the stock in place so it can setup,it takes air to get it hard so to speak and you just blocked it with the veneer not to say anything about the air pockets that you will need to roll out.

I would take it out side or to the garage and put on the veneer then take it back down stairs after a hour or two.
Or put a fan in the window and pull out the odors in the basement.

It would be a shame if the veneer started to come up after a bit, that's always a drag to redo it or redo the corners the 1st time something hits it and it pops up or snaps off.
Just a small NOTE***
I'm sure you know that 3M puts out great spray contact cement .it's quick and easy to use unlike the mess with paint brush or the wipe and spread on way. :)
I use the 3M #77 all the time and it holds just about anything.
All you need is just some sticks,3M,and a roller and your done.
Putting a HOT iron on wood will get the wood filbers to come up and you may need to resand the base or to say redo the hole thing.
You will always have moister in wood,it's just the way wood is :) not to say anything about the danger of burn marks or staning the top..

But this is just my 2 cents :)

Good Luck

Bj :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the response. I realize that contact cement is a good choice, but I'm hearing from others that the titebond method and and iron produce great results. As I mentioned before, I did a small test piece this way. After only a few moments after the iron I tried to lift a corner with my fingernail and had zero luck at it. I was very happy with the methods, just wanted to hear from others that have tried this.

Again, this was after both coats had dried. So it's my understanding that the iron would "reactivate" the glue?? Don't know for sure.

I was hoping to get some suggestions on this method before I jump to larger pieces. I'm wondering if anyone on this forum has ever used this method before. If not, that may leave me a little worried..
 

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By the way s7horton, welcome to the forums.
 

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I would recommend "sticking" with contact cement too.(Pun intended) Why don't you post your question at www.woodanswers.com and see if one of the pro's weighs in on this? I would be interested in their response.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
here is the response from woodanswers.com:

Q: I have a question about applying veneer. I know the recommended method is to use contact cement but I’ve been told you can use Titebond. The method is to apply it to both substrate and veneer, and once the glue is dry to the touch, use an iron to press the veneer onto the substrate. Have you heard of this method?

A: Yes, the iron on method works well with Titebond, but for that matter, so does simply pressing the veneer with wet Titebond glue. There is no rule that says you must use contact cement, and in fact, I know few if any people who use that for a wood to veneer bond. Contact cement is far more common with plastic laminates. For what it is worth, the iron on method also works very well with hide glue, either hot or liquid.
 

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I checked on this too. Vacuum clamping systems for holding veneer to an object when using white or yellow glue is available at Woodcraft stores. They charge a bundle for this set up. It seems to me that a Foodsaver or Seal-a-meal would do this job just fine, maybe better with their patented vacuum channel bags and material. I intend to give this a try in the near future.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
After working the weekend on this project, I'm very happy with the iron on method. Titebond is good glue that has a very good adhesion.

Vacuum press systems are very expensive, and something I can get by without.
 

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Yes, vacuum press systems are expensive. This is why I brought up the seal a meal type vacuum machines. They are under $100 and many people already own them. I believe the style with a vacuum port on top would be best for this application. I own one and intend to try it on my next veneer project.
 

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Hi S7 i use water based contact cement and it works a well as the other but no smell,,,,,i have used it on many projects all with exellent results . Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Actually, with the results I've been acheiving with the process I'm using now I don't see any reason to do anything different. This process has many things I like.

-very strong adhesion
-no clamping needed
-no need for separation sticks like contact cement.

The process I've been using is the following:

Apply titebond II to both substrate and veneer
Let dry
Apply second layer of titebond II to both substrate and veneer
Let dry, but not all the way. The surface is dry enough to run my hand over and not feel sticky.
Put veneer on substrate.
Apply heat with iron.

This leaves no air bubbles and a very clean surfarce. Don't screw it up though, or you have to use a chisel to remove it. I found that out the hard way. Corners stick nice and tight. It's a great process for me.
 
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