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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I took the plunge and ordered a 2x4 AVID Pro machine but intend to build a table for the time being.
A couple of questions for all the experienced folks:

1) I thought vertical routing might be good for joinery work and the ability to rout edges--but is it really?
2) On the AVID machine, would it be a bad idea to slide the front cross-member back about 1.5 inches from the edge when building the table frame? It doesn't look like that would interfere with anything on the side rails.

Since the work area already extends about 1 inch beyond the front edge, moving the cross-member back would allow mounting a vertical spoil board with 1-2 inches of y-motion for routing. I don't think it would diminish capability of horizontal routing either (?)

Rick
 

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1) I thought vertical routing might be good for joinery work and the ability to rout edges--but is it really?
It's the only way to cut "real" dovetails and box joints.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Ger.
Yep, and I was also wondering whether things like that were more trouble than worth, relative to a router table jig.
 

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David
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Welcome to the forum, Rick! Add your first name to your profile to clear the N/a in the side panel and add your location to your profile, as well.

We do like photos so show us your shop, tools, projects, etc. whenever you're ready. What sort of woodworking are you planning for the CNC?

If you make part of your spoilboard removable (or hinged like Frank Howarth did) then there's no reason you'll lose any Y axis capacity.

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks David... profile updated!

I was concerned that moving the front cross-member could interfere with gantry operation, affect rigidity, or wasn't even possible for some reason. Just looking for confirmation before starting to build a table to include vertical capability at the front edge. Of course, I have 10-12 weeks to sort this out :(

rick
 

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David
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Check out Frank Howarth's video on doing the drop table on his CNC. Of course, his is huge and he has plenty of room but he uses his often.

My CNC is a welded steel frame so I don't have the option of moving a cross member but my spindle comes out almost 2" past the front cross member and I made the entire section of spoilboard removable between the first and second cross members if I want to stand something up and machine the end.

David
 

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Ross
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Welcome to the forum Rick.
 

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Yep, and I was also wondering whether things like that were more trouble than worth, relative to a router table jig.
I wrote some software for creating g-code for dovetails and box joints, and IMO it's far superior to a router table or jig.

When cutting dovetails on a jig, you're options are very limited.
On the CNC, you can cut an infinite variety of joints, as depth and spacing are unlimited.
And if you have a vertical fixture on your machine, there's virtually zero setup time.
You can have your joints finished before you can even get your jig setup and ready to use.
 

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Mike
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Welcome to the Router Forums Rick.

Here is a video you might want to watch on adding tables to an Avid CNC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ger, good to hear that-- seemed that it could be easier. Was thinking it possible to have some parameterized CAD (g-code?) for dovetail, box joint, mortise+tenon that could be loaded up on-demand and run. I'm a total newbie and maybe that's what you did.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Mike,
Thanks, that's the idea! Since I plan to build my base, I wanted to mount the vertical table at the very front between the ends of the rails by shifting the cross-member back a couple inches. Seems it would be easier to use instead of leaning over the rail--and I'm a bit vertically challenged :)
 

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Mike,
Thanks, that's the idea! Since I plan to build my base, I wanted to mount the vertical table at the very front between the ends of the rails by shifting the cross-member back a couple inches. Seems it would be easier to use instead of leaning over the rail--and I'm a bit vertically challenged :)
Rick,

Here's a link to my 80/20 custom build. Post #396 has pictures and description of the jig I made for dovetail and box joint work. It's loosely based on Leigh jigs. You may find it gives you some ideas. Feel free to copy, if you want. https://www.cnczone.com/forums/diy-cnc-router-table-machines/378934-cnc-machinist-20.html

Oh, and there are no problems with setting the front rail back a few inches. If you are using an Avid leg set, you will want to set the front legs back, so they line up with your front crossmember. If your making your own stand, you will want your front cross support under the front cross rail.

Use JointCam for your software. Here's a link: JointCAM - CNC Dovetails and Box Joints

Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks Gary -- some great info in that thread. Planning to look into JointCAM.

If I follow correctly, it looks like your fixture sits at the very front of the AVID table and you did not need to set the front rail back to provide enough y-axis for vertical work?

rick
 

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Thanks Gary -- some great info in that thread. Planning to look into JointCAM.

If I follow correctly, it looks like your fixture sits at the very front of the AVID table and you did not need to set the front rail back to provide enough y-axis for vertical work?

rick
Rick,

Not quite right. I set my front crossmember and spoilboard back to ensure I had enough clearance. However, you are correct that my fixture sits on the very front of my spoilboard. Finally, mine is not an "AVID table." I used some parts from Avid, but my design doesn't much resemble Avid's. We have 80/20 extrusions in common but most of the extrusions I used are twice the cross sectional size and more than twice as heavy (I used the heavyweight extrusions; Avid uses the lighter weight ones). My machine is still evolving, but I had a setback. Unfortunately, an otherwise unremarkable fall tore the left leg patellar tendon loose from my knee cap. The subsequent surgery and months of physical therapy has kept me out of the shop for several months. I'm just getting back to it.

Gary
 
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