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I’m looking for a jig to cut finger joints using a router, this is a sled type jig sliding the wood piece across the cutter. Also known as Box Comb Jig, Axminster machinery made one that was fairly simple but will do the job the part number was 700308, unfortunately this is no longer made being discontinued in 2012. I would appreciate anyone who has one of these, and would like to sell it, please. PM me with details and a couple of pictures if possible.
 

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This is one of those "american english / Uk english crossover descriptions.
We've had many discussions on it, A finger joint has tapered sides to all lots of glue to join boards side by side. Seen on all engineered wood.
A box joint has square cuts to interlock.
But as long as youre posting a on an american forum, youre just about right (lol)

Yes, I AM English.
Theres not a lot of axminster stuff in america, you might be better off advertising in a more UK based forum. try ukworkshop.co.uk
 

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I like box joints, prefer over dovetails because of ease of making. Just had a thought, there is a lot written about hand made dovetails, but never seen anything about handmade box joints.

Just saying,
Herb
 

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If you are looking to buy a box joint jig, I highly recommend the Incra I-Box jig.

It can be used on either a router table or a table saw, and is easily calibrated and then adjusted for different width box joints. Once initially calibrated, changing the size of the joint from one pin width to another is very easy, because the jig changes the pin and space width together with just one adjustment. The calibration is easy too, just turn a silver knob until the finger just lightly touches the blade or bit tooth lightly. Once calibrated, you only need to re-calibrate if the blade or bit are changed for another.

The jig also contains a sacrificial piece that reduces edge tear out and works well when using the jig on a table saw. If using the jig on a router table it's best to add a second sacrificial piece behind the work because the router bit is cutting both into as well as out of the work on both sides due to it's rotation. The included sacrificial piece is just 1/4" MDF. When using the router table I just add a second piece of 1/4" MDF behind my work piece and use both it and the one in the jig to reduce tear out on both sides of the work piece.

When using my I-box jig with a Freud SBOX8 box joint blade set on my table saw, all I need to do is set the jig for the pin width that I want and then make one test cut to be sure that I have the jig set correctly. Them position the sacrificial piece to an unused position and begin cutting my box joints. Like I said before, the I-box jig automatically sets the pin and space width together as you change the jig for a different pin size. The test cut is usually just to get the joint to fit loose enough for the glue.

I make a lot of boxes, many of them with box joints made with the I-Box jig and the Freud SBOX8 blade set on my table saw. After buying this jig, all of my shop made box joint jigs went into the burn pile. The attached photos are of a close-up of one of my recent box joints, made in 12 mm Baltic Birch. They all turn out this good when using the I-Box jig and SBOX8 blade set.

I know the jig's inventor and he demonstrated the jig for me before it was on the market and I knew that I had to have one just as soon as it became available. I have no other connections to Incra or him, except to know him as a friend.

Charley
 

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@reuelt

Pleased to hear you are happy with the Rockler jig. One of the criticism I had been hearing was that the tended to "wiggle" a bit. Admittedly, that was about 2 years ago so perhaps they have stepped up their game. Based on those old comments, I followed Theo's lead and built my own.
 

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@reuelt

Pleased to hear you are happy with the Rockler jig. One of the criticism I had been hearing was that the tended to "wiggle" a bit. Admittedly, that was about 2 years ago so perhaps they have stepped up their game. Based on those old comments, I followed Theo's lead and built my own.
In Australia. Carbatec is one of the best SPECIALIST shop for woodworkers. If they choose to sell anything, it is usually OK because they are very knowledgeable. I used to visit them very often when they were nearer the city. They once disposed of their imported routers at half price because the collets were found to be not so accurate and stopped selling them ever again.

Anyway, I never quarrel with my tools. I usually choose tools very carefully before I buy and then would improve on them before I start using them. For the Rockler jig I drilled holes on my router table and screwed it down with wing nuts instead of just using the mitre track - to minimise errors.
 
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