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So I've had the Laguna 14-12 for a few years and have used a few blades and really like the saw. What I've seen over the use is some blades that do well and others not so much. I've used mostly Timberwolf blades but the last few I bought had weld issues causing the blades not to run true. You could see them moving forward and backwards, not side to side.

Laguna sent me one of their 1/2" blades which did an excellent job cutting and I have a Wood Slicer 1/2" and 3/4" resaw blade of which I've only used the 1/2" which again did an excellent job. I really think using 3/4" blades on the 14-12 is pushing it as the front and rear of the blade isn't fully supported and tends to travel a bit. I set my blades so they track the center of the tire which eliminates any run out in my cuts. They run true and straight.

There are a number of blades out there and for some reason the 115" that the 14-12 take seem to be an off size, available from all it seems but maybe custom so not in stock. I've wanted to try the Carter brand but again not a stock size and by time you figure in shipping they get fairly pricey. Hoping I can order some and have them deliver at the Chantilly Woodworkers Show that my son and I are going to.

But the real question is what blades do you find work really well for you? This would be the general purpose blades not resawing, I'm happy with what I'm using now. I will also be adding the Carter Stabilizer to my band saw for using 3/", 1/4", and smaller blades.
 

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I haven't really found a single blade that I'm in love with, or even like. I've also found that not all blades are exactly the length claimed. I have one 93.5 that fits inside another 93.5. It was closer to 92.5 and required major adjustment to get to fit. Drove me crazy until I figured that out, could barely get it on my saw. I have 4 others that are within simple tensioning distance. The outlier (inlier?) was a Carter, by the way. They were not very helpful when I contacted them. I think it was a mismarked 92.5
 

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I have the same saw and have settled into their 4tpi, half inch blade for general use. Their Resaw King is really nice, but I haven't really used it much. The half inch blade does a good job of resawing also, but if I were resawing a tall piece, I prefer the 3/4 Resaw King. I have half inch down to 3/16ths for my small, benchtop Rikon, with 72.5 inch blades. It will resaw much better than I have a right to expect using a 4 tpi blade. All my small saw blades are Timberwolf and they are quite good. If I have to replace the 14-12 blades, I'll give the Timberwolfs a try.

BTW, on any bandsaw blade, I always round over the back edge with a stone, and it always smooths out the operation of the saw and makes it a little easier to turn the blade for a curved piece, and it makes it a little easier to back the workpiece off the blade.

I like the cool blocks on the Laguna far better than the fiddly Carter guides on my old Delta and the new Rikon. They are intuitive to use.
 

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Like Phil I don't know that I'm in love with any brand yet. I used to get them made locally from Sandvik coil stock I think. Lately I've been getting mine from Stockroom Supply on this side of the border. They custom make whatever you need and mine isn't stck either. I have an 18" that uses a 128" blade. I used to do my resawiing with a 1 1/4" 2/3 tooth per inch. It broke recently after quite a few years of use. My saw is only rated for 1" wide but it worked fine. Steve being unsupported across the width as it goes around the wheels isn't important. It's still flat where the teeth meet the wood.

You need a few different blades. I have one meant for sawing green wood. I guess it has more set to do that. Smaller blades for thinner material should have more teeth. My bandsaw book by Mark Duginske says that there should be 3 to 4 teeth in the wood when cutting so that affects what you need. Too many teeth is not good. I found out the hard way on that. The blade doesn't eject the sawdust fast enough and runs fairly hot because of it.
 
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We have the Laguna 14SUV and the only blade I have ever had on it is the 1" Resaw King, so I may not be much help to you. It's a great blade for resawing which is all I do on this bandsaw. I use my 12" King-Seeley for every other bandsaw need.

David
 

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I'm with most of the replies... Good results from the Timberwolf and Woodslicer 1/2" for resawing the 3/4" a little too much for my Grizzly 14" w/riser kit. I use the smaller Carter blades with the Carter Stabilizer for smalls. I'm not crazy over the Carter blades. I popped one but I was pushing it beyond the norm.... a $30 oopsie.
 

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Pix of the gadget I use to roundover the back edges of the blade. And also a chart showing minimum radius for different size blades. With my old saw, I used a number of Olson blades, ok, but short life before dulling

A few years ago I visited Laguna's warehouse/shop in Newport Beach, CA. Got to fondle the big saws, but also watched their automatic sharpening machine working on the Resaw King blades. Huge machine making tiny steps. I can see why that company has such good gear after watching how they set up their products. A friend on that visit bought on of their 18 inch Italian made saws. 4 grand, plus another 2 grand in accessories. The bearings on that saw were heavy as heck, no wonder they never go up for sale used.
 

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So I've had the Laguna 14-12 for a few years and have used a few blades and really like the saw. What I've seen over the use is some blades that do well and others not so much. I've used mostly Timberwolf blades but the last few I bought had weld issues causing the blades not to run true. You could see them moving forward and backwards, not side to side.

Laguna sent me one of their 1/2" blades which did an excellent job cutting and I have a Wood Slicer 1/2" and 3/4" resaw blade of which I've only used the 1/2" which again did an excellent job. I really think using 3/4" blades on the 14-12 is pushing it as the front and rear of the blade isn't fully supported and tends to travel a bit. I set my blades so they track the center of the tire which eliminates any run out in my cuts. They run true and straight.

There are a number of blades out there and for some reason the 115" that the 14-12 take seem to be an off size, available from all it seems but maybe custom so not in stock. I've wanted to try the Carter brand but again not a stock size and by time you figure in shipping they get fairly pricey. Hoping I can order some and have them deliver at the Chantilly Woodworkers Show that my son and I are going to.

But the real question is what blades do you find work really well for you? This would be the general purpose blades not resawing, I'm happy with what I'm using now. I will also be adding the Carter Stabilizer to my band saw for using 3/", 1/4", and smaller blades.
I have a Laguna 14 | 12 on which I've used Timberwolf as well, and I've had good results from this brand. I also like the Starrett brand which is sold by Woodcraft. I just bought a 3/16" 4 TPI, skipped tooth blade from Highland Woodworking for bandsaw boxes, and it too works fine with the bandsaw's factory guides. A local custom bandsaw blade manufacturer gave me a 3/4" which I tested, and it ran true.

i've just installed the Carter bandsaw blade stabilizer, and have done a few test curves using the 3/16" blade. My problem is not really feeling confident tensioning the blades properly. I've seen Alex Snodgrass, Carter products, say tension any blade such that pushing it laterally with your finger it will "give" only 1/8" (if memory serves me).

I've just read of EZtension bandsaw tension guide ($40) in the April 2020 FineWoodworking magazine (#281), and I may "bite the bullet" and get it. But I note that the smallest blade that it will work on is 1/4" excluding my 3/16" that I use for bandsaw boxes. How does everybody tension your blades, especially a small 3/16" blade? All articles I've read say "Don't use the bandsaw's tension guide as it's not correct."

By the way, Snodgrass says that the centering of the blade on the wheel should center the rear of the gullet on the wheel, and not the center of the blade width. Your assistance will be greatly appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Jose I agree that the blade's gullet should be centered on the tire and the teeth should not touch guide bearings/ceramic guides and the that's how I do it. I find I can get travel if the blade isn't set this way and the reason why I don't use the 3/4" wide blade anymore. I have to send my stabilizer back as it turns out they have 2 for the 14-12 and the JET1 works on those 14-12's that still have the original ceramic guides and the other works on those that have the Carter bearings installed, like mine. Mine is being sent back today so maybe next week I'll have a better idea what I can do.

As for tension I usually check the lower left side of the upper wheel meaning I tension until I get about 1/4" flew with one finger without it turning red (moderate pressure). That said I also calibrated my gauge which seems to do fine on the larger blades (1/2"-3/8"). The gauge is magnetic so you can move as needed.

Trick is knowing just where right is. I had a friend check after I had adjusted and he's well versed on band saws so I felt more confident afterwards. Another consideration is some blade require more/less tension so read the info that comes with your blade. I don't think it's super critical but you should be close. the 1/4" flex with the finger seems right and agrees with how my gauge is now set. The $40 tool you reference may not work on smaller blades but might actually get your gauge calibrated so it's of better use.

If you get a chance to go to a Woodworkers Show it's worth the trip if for no other reason then to see Alex Snodgrass and actually get to ask him questions. I think he attends most of these and know I've seen him at the one in Chantilly Virginia which made the drive worth it by itself. Very nice guy.
 

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I don't get drift if I center just back of the gullet. And I use the finger deflection method for tension pretty much as steve does, per the Snodgrass video. I don't tension quite as much for the really thin blades. I think sometimes we forget to set the forward/back adjustment on the guides when changing blades, but that support is really important to set correctly, embracing as much of the blade as possible without touching the teeth. That can vary some based on the depth of the gullet. As often happens, machine performance is a function of proper setup.
 

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Just looked up the EZ Tension device and it looks a lot like it is similar to the very expensive tension measurning device in that it uses the expansion of the blade under tension, but instead of a gauge, it just disconnects on of two magnets set a few inches apart along the exposed part of the blade. Good for 1/4 to 3/4 blades. For someone who wants precision, it looks like it might be a good option, although Steve's push without turning your finger red, is the clearest description I've ever heard of the one finger deflecting 1/4 inch method. Once again, we get back to the precision admonition - it's wood and maybe engineering tolerances aren't really possible or practical.
 

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I use both Timber Wolf and Starrett blades in my 14/12. Both brands work well - at least as well as the operator. As for tensioning I use the flutter method described in the manual which has also worked well for me.
 

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I tension via sounding/plucking method. I believe it is best because a true sound only comes when the blade, regardless of size, hits its own proper tension.

One critical consideration for the deflection method is choosing the correct distance between blade support points. For example, it is easy to intuitively grasp that when the bearings are set a given distance apart, let’s say 12” apart, that a 1/4” blade will easily deflect 3/16” with minimal side pressure, whereas a 3/4” resaw blade is so innately stiff that that same side pressure won’t budge it.

I don’t know how to resolve this, and that’s why I use the harmonic/sounding method. Inch for lineal inch, a 3/4” blade has far more metal/matter in it than that 1/4”, and as a result it takes considerably more tension to make “tight.” I find that “tight” has a clean, pure sound when plucked. Maybe this is the same as side deflection, but my observations with my 1” Resaw King versus my 1/4” blades reveal that the sounding method works well.
 

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My saw uses a 111" and so far timberwolf has worked well for me, I have 1 grizzly 3/16" for bandsaw boxes and it runs good, because I have a 1 1/2 hp motor I don't push it with a 3/4" balde only use up to a 1/2"
Based on the specs you're laying out, I think you may have the Rikon 14" 10-324? (I think that's the model)

Anyways, I have the same saw and just wanted to let you know I run a nice stiff 3/4" for resawing on that saw and it works PHENOMENAL. Don't be afraid to use the 3/4" blade! It tracks well, doesn't drift in cuts, and takes care of resawing stock at a reasonable pace. The only thing that is tough to acclimate to is setting the tension. You will crank on it pretty good and think it is gonna pop before it is set correct. Heavy piece of steel, takes a lot of tension!

Good Luck!
 

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I am using Draper 13773 Bandsaw and It features a cast-iron frame and steel ball-bearing wheel guides, helping to combat vibrations. The fence is made of cast aluminum, which will ensure a long life of accurate cuts. Experts consider it as the top-ranked bandsaw among the few best hobby bandsaws.
 
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