Router Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello I started building my router table top last weekend and I have a question. What would be the best place to put the base plate in the table top? The top is 24 x 36 and because Iv'e never used or seen anyone els use a router table I don't have a clue were would be best for practical usage
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
Have a look at the router table used on the router workshop or look at the offset style at woodpecker's. They both male better use of the space than sticking it right in the center. I also agree with Bob Rosendahl and Pat Warner don't weaken the table by cutting a miter slot, make a sled (holder) instead.

Regards

Jerry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply Iv'e seen lots of pics of different router tables and the different locations of the base plates I'm just trying to deside which way would be best for me to go. I have no idea what you mean by a sled holder I made my table top out of two counter tops I got for free,I glued them together laminate sides out and then cut to size so the table is prety solid do you think a 1/4 inch deep miter would weaken it all that much?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Try and keep the base plate slightly off centre toward the back..this will give you more table to work with. meaning if your doing large tops, you will have more support.
Mitre slots donot weaken the table unless your table is too thin to begin with.It sounds like your top will be about 2 1/4 inches thickness. Running a 3/4 w by 1/4 deep wont do any harm.

Hickory
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
Most miter slots are big enough to allow a 3/8 x 3/4 bar to slide in them and yes I think this will eventually compromise the table.I didn't mean a sled holder I meant a sled or a carrier that references off the fence,or something else stationary that a piece may be clamped to.Have a look at oak-park.com -raised panel jig- that might make it cleareRegards
Jerry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,702 Posts
Hi,

I have some of both types of tables, the big advantage I see to the off-set design is if you have the router mounted on a removable plate and this lets you have some place to sit the router down while you change bits etc. If the table is big enough this become less of an issue.

If you do put a miter slot in you might want to get an aluminum miter slot extrusion or better yet one with a t-slot. These can be glued/screwed and glued into the table and will more then make up for the missing material when the table is 1-1/8" thick or more.

I don't use a miter gauge very often but do like to attach finger boards and other jigs using this method. If you have trouble finding these let me know I have a lot of catalogs laying around and can get you started with some examples.

Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
If you have a miter guage sliding in a slot it must be perfectly parallel to the fence. Not necessary with a sliding jig (holder) Another reason not to cut one.

Regards

Jerry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I wasn't planning on cutting a slot for a miter in my table, please let me apologize for my on stupidity I misunderstood what jerry was talking about in his first reply to my question. I would like to thank everyone for there opinions though.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top