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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new to using a router and have never used a bushing before. There is no holes in my baseplate or bushing adapter and the bushing guide all combined to completely obstruct the view. Is this intended to be a "route by feel" process? What is the best way to practice using template and bushing so I don't make a mistake when it counts? I am making a new top for my table saw and want to make zero clearance inserts from a template so I can make them again later as needed.

dmac257
 

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@DMac

Are you doing this hand held or on a router table?

The easiest way would be to use a table and a flush trim bit. The flush trim bit has a bearing which is at the end of the bit away from the router. On a table mounted router, the bearing would be the uppermost part of the bit. With the template attached to your stock, you run the stock against the bit so that the bearing rides along your bit and trims the excess from your table saw plate. In this manner, you always feed the stock from right to left, with the bit to the right of the template/stock.

If you were to do this handheld , the bearing would be near the bottom and you would then keep your stock/template to the left of the bit, but still feed from right to left. It would be a lot harder to secure the stock/template in this fashion.

If you use a bushing, you have to take into account the offset of the bushing, meaning the template would have to be smaller than the finished size of the insert. Depends on the OD (outside diameter) of the bushing and the size of the bit. You don't need a bearing with a bushing.

Hope that all makes sense.
 

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For Practice....
Bushing on, , bit in place, motor off...find and feel a straight edge of any board...run the router right to left (or towards you) with board on the right of router...pick up router at end of travel and continue til arms hurt
Bushing on, bit in place, motor off...do the same as above with any piece of wood that has curves/angles/dangles....you get the idea...

Then, do the same thing with the motor on...get the feel of the vibrations against and away from the wood...

Then, clamp a couple of straight pieces together so that the bottom board is proud of the top board by about 1/8"...route sufficiently til you get the feel of the bushing hitting the top piece and the cut against the bottom piece...take the router away and look at your starting point...is it smooth, not jumpy, etc... Repeat as necessary...

Then, have at it...you're ready to go...

...be safe...
 

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to accurately use your insert as a tenplate use a bearing guided trim bit...
 

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Theo
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@DMacThe easiest way would be to use a table and a flush trim bit. The flush trim bit has a bearing which is at the end of the bit away from the router. On a table mounted router, the bearing would be the uppermost part of the bit. With the template attached to your stock, you run the stock against the bit so that the bearing rides along your bit and trims the excess from your table saw plate. In this manner, you always feed the stock from right to left, with the bit to the right of the template/stock.
Yep, exactly, except I say master, instead of template. The only trick is to make your template perfect, then all your duplicates will be identical. I trace around my master, then rough cut the stock within about 1/8" to 1/4" from the line, 1/8" is preferred, if 1/4" may have to rout slower. You can attach the stock with rubber cement or double sided tape, I drill pilot holes in my masters and use small nails - nail on the 'bad' side of the stock, then the nail holes are on the bottom. Also make my masters of two layers 1/2" plywood, my preference.
 

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I made a bunch of blank saw inserts not long ago for my Unisaw. It has a fairly thick insert so I used it and a pattern bit (upper shaft mounted bearing). I rough cut the inserts to close to size with a jig saw and then stuck the blanks to the saw's insert with a few dabs of hot melt glue then I clamped them on the edge of a bench and routed til I hit the clamps. Then reclamped and finished them. A half dozen inserts took maybe 30 minutes. Remember to drill a finger hole off to one side so that you can pull them when you need. I wrote on the underside of them what blade I used them for and whether I used stabilizers with the blade.
 

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One of the several features that I list as important when choosing a router is a LARGE opening in the base. This allows LARGE template guides to be used which in turn allow the chuck to pass through, giving a greater depth of cut. These shots illustrate what I mean.
 

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I wrote on the underside of them what blade I used them for and whether I used stabilizers with the blade.
I believe that writing info on things like that is one of the more important things you can do in the shop. On every one of my masters I write anything useful I can think of. Besides not needing to think about what the master is for, etc., the writing stops you from using the master in whatever project you are working on - and then you have to make another master, DAHIKT.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
One of the several features that I list as important when choosing a router is a LARGE opening in the base. This allows LARGE template guides to be used which in turn allow the chuck to pass through, giving a greater depth of cut. These shots illustrate what I mean.
That kind of looks like my 3612. Are you saying there are bushing guides that fit that opening and screwed in place from below but are 40mm ID to allow the collet/chuck to pass through? I will have to search for bushing guide instead of bushing guide ADAPTER. All I saw was an adapter to allow using Porter Cable bushing guides.

dmac257
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
OK .. I understand the mechanics of making a DUPLICATE of an existing insert. In my case the top of the saw is not flat from corner to corner and the miter slots are sharp causing binding for anything moving in the slot. See the attached image.

so I will take a piece of birch plywood and put three pieces of birch plywood on top separated by "perfect" aluminum miter slots. The center of the three will need an insert cutout. See image with no orange. A template with a hole for my pattern would work to make the place for the insert. Similar to inlay process, I was thinking that if I use a bushing with OD of 3/8" for the saw top and switch to a bushing with an OD of 7/16" but same template and bit, when I cut the insert it SHOULD make an insert that is 1/32" smaller all around (if I understand the process correctly). See image with orange insert. Once I have an insert that fits proper, I can make that insert into template and all others made from it will be exactly the same.

I haven't started building yet, so if you all have any other suggestions of a better/easier way, please let me hear it.

I don't understand inserting images. why can't I put it in middle of what I am explaining??


dmac257
 

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That kind of looks like my 3612. Are you saying there are bushing guides that fit that opening and screwed in place from below but are 40mm ID to allow the collet/chuck to pass through? I will have to search for bushing guide instead of bushing guide ADAPTER. All I saw was an adapter to allow using Porter Cable bushing guides.

dmac257
Makita, at least hear in Australia make a wide range of template guides including 40mm. Before I started with health problems I made and sent LOTS of 40mm Makita style guides to members in America, all as presents, I even made and sent a few SETS of metric guides to friends in America.
 

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One other possibility that is much simpler. Make the top two layers and make the top layer out of 4 separate pieces. Two full length ones for each side and two short ones for front to back. Leave a gap between the two short pieces that is a long enough and wide enough gap to be your insert. There is no particularly good reason why it has to be a long oval. Then you can use the saw to cut replacements in a fraction of the time.
 
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That kind of looks like my 3612. Are you saying there are bushing guides that fit that opening and screwed in place from below but are 40mm ID to allow the collet/chuck to pass through? I will have to search for bushing guide instead of bushing guide ADAPTER. All I saw was an adapter to allow using Porter Cable bushing guides.

dmac257
Your last sentence has only just sunk in, those adaptors are next to useless, no chuck will pass through them, not only that, but if the router is plunged too far and it touches the adaptor it can unscrew it and send it flying! I know from experience!
Here is a pdf of a project that I posted some time ago which shows deep routing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
One other possibility that is much simpler. Make the top two layers and make the top layer out of 4 separate pieces. Two full length ones for each side and two short ones for front to back. Leave a gap between the two short pieces that is a long enough and wide enough gap to be your insert. There is no particularly good reason why it has to be a long oval. Then you can use the saw to cut replacements in a fraction of the time.
I read this twice and the thought ... Duh! Why didn't I think of that?

sort of like this?

between the two miter tracks is four pieces glued down and the insert with easy cutting. Great Idea!!

dmac257
 

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Yes, like that. If you use 3/8 or 1/2 (can’t remember the outside height of mitre track) material for the top layer then you could piece around the tracks. Thicker material would require grooves for the track.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yes, like that. If you use 3/8 or 1/2 (can’t remember the outside height of mitre track) material for the top layer then you could piece around the tracks. Thicker material would require grooves for the track.
yeah, I was planning to do bottom layer of 3/8" and piece around the aluminum miter track with 1/2".. trouble is the track is slightly thicker than the 1/2" so I will have to chase the channel with the router to trim some of the bottom under the track. My first actual use of my new router besides practice.

dmac257
 
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