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would list your intimidations please...
Now, after a couple weeks rubbing elbows with you confident and crazy peoples, they are lessened, but still present.

#1 Intimidation - The ever-present chance of major permanent physical injury. I bleed easier and heal slower than when I was young. My reflexes are likewise not what they once were.

Beyond making sure I have appropriate Ear, Eye, and Lung Protection, the bestest advice I've gotten from RF is
"Focus on what you are doing like a cat focuses on a bird on the windowsill."
Keeping that level of attention on what I am doing will hopefully keep me safe.
But I'm still intimidated. I think for Safety, perhaps a little intimidation is a good thing.
At least I'm past the "petrified hesitation," stage.

#2 Intimidation - Unfamiliarity with tools - Up until now, the largest project I've ever tackled was cutting 4" baseboard trim for the entire house - We ended up buying a compound miter saw and stand from Harbor Freight or I would still be cutting the damn things. Mainly it's a hand hacksaw, or my Dremel tool, or a hammer, or buy a readymade whatever.
I now possess a 3 HP plunge router in a Rockler router table, and a 15 Amp 10" portable table saw...I feel like I'm buying General Mills in order to get 10 pounds of buckwheat and rice flour blended with all-purpose...

All I can do is try to find people who know what the hell I am trying to accomplish with these fancy tools, and help keep me on the path by nudging me away from dangerous precipices of obsessive overthinking, or careless/clueless omission.
Thankfully, I found RF...
Words cannot convey the confidence you have given me to tackle this project and feel firmly confident that I can do it.

#3 Intimidation - Clearances and Tolerances. Unlike hand tools, where you might make a mark or ding, and then correct, these things can too quickly turn an "oops" moment into an "aw poop!" moment.
I'm not too worried about trashing out my tools, I'm too intimidated by their speed and power to be careless and drop tools on the tables or scatter screwdrivers near my bits and blades.
But I have some concern on ruining a piece of wood that is to be an inner cover for a hive, and having to start over again.

So this one will best be tackled by 1) Having a very clear idea of what I am going to be doing - I guess like visualization, where I walk through all the steps in my head, before tackling it, and 2)Practicing enough before I tackle my project, making sawdust as I get comfortable with the visual placement of the bits and blades to the fence, or the jig, trying to follow lines, with different depths and multiple passes.
One of the things I have to figure out how to do well is to make a rabbet cut inside the hive walls on two parallel sides to hold the honeycomb frames. The Down&Dirty method nails plywood inside the two walls, but plywood isn't real good for bees, although a lot of people still use it...

Old Dogs, New Tricks...Very hard to learn, but exciting as all get out.
~M
 
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Cautious and concerned is good. Petrified is very bad. Fear takes over your brain's operating system and prevents the good thoughts from taking over.

Always run a piece of scrap through first to verify your setup. Actually that has been a discussion topic before and the consensus was that there is no such thing as scrap, only wood that doesn't a purpose yet even if it is to test a setup.

Router tables are fairly safe as long as the fence only exposes part of the bit. As long as you feed from the correct direction the tendency of the bit is to push the wood away from the fence. Just keep your fingers away from the sharp whirly thing.

Running an operation through your mind first is perfect. It prepares you mentally to look for problems and to make sure your method is correct.

Once you've made a few cuts most of the fear will go away.
 
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Thanks, Katie.
I down it and have more knowledge from your sharing .
another question :
I am finding a new combo set Bosch RA118EVSTB , any one had this one , please give me a quick review of this combo ? any site with good reviews for reading before purchase one . Thanks :wink:
 

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Hey, John; welcome!
That package is based on the Bosch 1617EVS. Excellent router... a lot of us here have them, but you might get more bang for your buck by buying the same router in the 1617EVSPK configuration. It comes with the plunge router base as well as the fixed base (1617EVS)...the PK designation means the package deal.
Making a simple basic router table is cheap and easy. Having the plunge base is priceless! :)
 

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Hey, John; welcome!
That package is based on the Bosch 1617EVS. Excellent router... a lot of us here have them, but you might get more bang for your buck by buying the same router in the 1617EVSPK configuration. It comes with the plunge router base as well as the fixed base (1617EVS)...the PK designation means the package deal.
Making a simple basic router table is cheap and easy. Having the plunge base is priceless! :)
agreed...
 

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Welcome to the forum John. As Dan suggested building your own table is easy and cheap. You can use our Community Search function to look up router tables which will bring up all the posts about them and there are a lot. This will give you ideas to work with and you can always ask questions when you need help.
 

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Cautious and concerned is good. Petrified is very bad. Fear takes over your brain's operating system and prevents the good thoughts from taking over.

Always run a piece of scrap through first to verify your setup. Actually that has been a discussion topic before and the consensus was that there is no such thing as scrap, only wood that doesn't a purpose yet even if it is to test a setup.

Router tables are fairly safe as long as the fence only exposes part of the bit. As long as you feed from the correct direction the tendency of the bit is to push the wood away from the fence. Just keep your fingers away from the sharp whirly thing.

Running an operation through your mind first is perfect. It prepares you mentally to look for problems and to make sure your method is correct.

Once you've made a few cuts most of the fear will go away.
On the contrary, the tendency is for the router bit to push (or is it pull?) the workpiece TOWARD the fence.
 

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Great posting. Thank You


That PDF down load came with my second router table system. I purchased a Bosch RA1171 table years ago. Taught me how to use a table as a beginner. I still have the table as a back up and still use it on occasions. There are now great video clips on youtube that take that knowledge even further.
 

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Thanks for that link and all the other great info - scared to death of my router at the moment LOL
I trust that you are aware of the slew of PDF's to help you master your router safely...
here's a few to start you off..

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Man, what a great string! One thing I suggest is that you make sure whatever plate you get has a twist lock (or something similar) on the insert so you don't have to unscrew the darn thing every time you change bits. The Woodpecker plate is set up this way, but there are others as well. I use Sommerfeld door bit sets, which are carefully matched so that you can simply change bits without readjusting height.

Wish I had a taller fence than the Rockler model. Will have to make my own I guess. Sommerfeld also makes some terrific videos that show exactly how to work the table to make all kinds of cabinetry projects. His videos have been the best instructional material I've found because he goes through the entire process without interruption. No, I don't own stock, but do have several door sets that are great and his Katie Jig for cutting dovetails.

As to fear of sharp whirling things, that is what keeps you concentrated and alert. But what really keeps you safe is using push sticks and blocks to move your workpiece into the blade or bit. I have all kinds of push blocks and sticks and keep them very handy. Most used is the MicroJig Grripper, which is set to span the blade and allows you to simultaneously push forward, down and toward the fence while keeping your hands out of the danger zone.

On the router, I often use a block of MDF cut perfectly square to push the piece forward, while using another block to push down. This is a sacrificial item so it also eliminates tearout. I use something similar when holding a piece vertically on the router table. Always working to put something solid between my hands and the blade or bit. This requires thinking through every cut before making it.

Personal habits are also important. For example, at the table saw, when pushing something through the saw, even on a sled, my thumbs automatically fold in. I like my opposable digits.
 

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Thanks Tom - much appreciated...

Man, what a great string! One thing I suggest is that you make sure whatever plate you get has a twist lock (or something similar) on the insert so you don't have to unscrew the darn thing every time you change bits. The Woodpecker plate is set up this way, but there are others as well. I use Sommerfeld door bit sets, which are carefully matched so that you can simply change bits without readjusting height.
Actually,this was a question I was going to ask soon because I found it very difficult to change bits.

On the HF table I had to lower the router and use 2 wrenches to set the bit

On my home made table top, I have to remove the router - interestingly enough though - this is easier since the router slides out of the base and can be removed while the base is still attached to the table top.
 

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Good find . I never even thought of holding a smaller piece with one of my wood clamps . Good stuff
 

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more....

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not done yet...

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