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I just ran across this thread and was disappointed to find the link was dead.

I did a lot of searching and I believe I have found the correct link to the original document. Since I did not see the original document I am not certain this is correct but it is from a Woodsmith Seminar and has the title; Essential Guide To The Router Table".

https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/view/47504788/router-table-woodsmith-woodworking-seminars

https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/read/47504788/router-table-woodsmith-woodworking-seminars
 

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Another good source of information are the Marc Sommerfeld videos on youtube. He plugs his own products, but he was a cabinet maker and his techniques are worth studying.
 

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I have a router table but rarely use it if ever. I have 2 routers that are screwed to pieces of 2'x2' plywood. I then can clamp this plywood to most any bench and then add in my fences and stops and blade guards. One I have a rounding over bit setup to take the edge off of things so there is almost no setup time with it. Clamp and route. Working with boys 9 to 18 for almost 28 years now they can do wood work but it has to be made very safe. I like to cover up the blades so all they can do is push the material through. (they don't use a jointer most of the other tools they can use)
These plywood router tables are cheap (well they used to be haaaah) and easy to move from shop to church for activities. I just jig them up at home and take them where the boys are.
 

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You will find that there is a great deal more that can be achieved when the router is taken out of the table and used in the plunge mode
Wow now you have opened a can of worms. I asked the question several years ago on what people did with a handheld router that they couldn't do with it table mounted. What I got were a few things that were the exception rather than general everyday routing. Cutting mortises were mentioned. How many mortises does the average person do? My guess is not many if so then they would buy a mortising machine and make their life easy. Making signs, Well you can't make a real sign with a handheld router you can carve letters and designs but these aren't real signs, for those reach for a CNC machine. Someone mentioned routing out stringers for stairs, Okay raise your hand if you make a lot of stairs. How about flattening boards with a ski. Well if you're at that level of woodworking I would hope that you would have the correct tools for planning wood. How about dados for cabinet shelves? Good point but how long does it take to set up guides and how difficult is it to get a router bit the exact size of the piece of wood that you want to use for the shelf? If you're doing a dado then head to the correct tool which is the table saw. So the list went on. So yes you can use the handheld router to do tasks that can't be done on a table but doing those jobs are done out of necessity and not because the handheld is the best tool for it. I think that getting by with a substitute tool only leads to exasperation and limits how far you can advance in woodworking (or any other hobby)How many have reached for the closest hardest tool such as a wrench to try and drive a nail or straighten one out? Using the router in the table is the only safe way to make molding and it's the only sure way of keeping the edge perfect and not wavy. The table is the only safe way to make rail and stile doors and the only safe way to make raised panel doors ( a table saw is even better for some types of raised panels). The table is also the only safe way to route really small pieces. Since I did my last post, several years ago, on using the table-mounted router I haven't removed it more than once or maybe twice and I can't remember why I removed it. Maybe I haven't removed it I don't know. But for those that use a handheld let me know what for. I honestly have no use for the handheld features.
 

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I agree. I found the router to be one wood eating machine unless it is jigged up bolted or screwed down. However having said that. I have one piece that a opps made it have personality so I recreated that opps to balance out the first opps and it came out good. YET more often than not a free hand router seems to allow all kinds of expertise that includes opps in it. For me and my shop we use jigs.
 

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I am a little late to the dance, however I am receiving the following message when I click on the link
This page doesn't exist..."
 
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