Router Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

A friend of mine wants me to cut a complex shape in basswood, including a lot of sharp edges and corners. These edges vary randomly in direction relative to the grain.

I have no real trouble with cutting smooth smooth curves with ball nose tools. My problem is only the sharp edges and corners. It seems like there is always at least one grain direction where the router leaves little uncut bristles. I can't seem to get rid of all that "fuzz" - without hand sanding.

I'm assuming the keys are sharp bit (maybe straight flute for chip removal but minimal tearing) - relatively low rates of cutting (depth, stepover, ipm) - high rpm. I think another component is sequence of cuts, but I'm floundering.

I'd like to know if it is possible (or practical) to cut basswood cleanly, without needing significant sanding (and maybe sanding sealer). Does anybody have any suggestions, please? [Maybe I should just go back to hardwoods (only).]

Thanks for your attention.

Norm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
202 Posts
Concerning the fuzzies left by carving, it is my experiance that a small brass bristle brush works well. The brush is about the size of a toothbrush and is available from Harbor Frieght in a thee pack along with a nylon and stainless steel brush. The other two brushes are good to remove dust after the brass brush does it's work. Buy a couple of brass brushes because the bristles tend to bunch up after a lot of use. Result, no hand sanding and the ability to get into small areas not accessable to hand sanding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Hey Norm - I watch a woodsculpting program and they are often using basswood for its' softness and workability. I looked up basswood on Woodworking.com but it only gave Butternut as wood with similar properties. I think you are on the right track re: the sanding sealer because they mention it in the article below:
Butternut | Wood Species | Woodworking
Steve from California
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
No matter what you do I believe you will get the fuzzies from certain species of wood. I use a brass wire brush to get rid of the fuzzies. (and a little sanding) Yes your best bet is to use a sharp new bit as machining goes the bit will wear and some hand cleaning is require when need oh well. Have fun and Happy Cutting.
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
202 Posts
A brass brush is the answer. We can hide/overlook things but there is no shortcut to quality. In woodworking, machinery will get us close to a final product but there is always hand work for that final product. The mark of a fine product is when another person chooses to run their hand over it. Now, that's appreaciation!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Hi Guys,

Thanks very much for the thoughts and helpful advice. Glad it's not just me.

I've tried all sorts of things and in certain grain conditions there is no solution but hand work.

Norm
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top