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Hi all i have just purchased a Makita DRT50Z Makita 18V battery unit and would like to know if there are any concerns or tips for using it mounted as a work table, ie how to emergency stop etc.
 

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I want it for light work only but prefer the steady and secure option of being able to use a table rather than hand held. It comes with a plunge base etc so can be easily fixed to a table insert. The question I have is not power related but more so about how to use a battery powered device with no means of fitting a bump stop OFF button.
 

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I want it for light work only but prefer the steady and secure option of being able to use a table rather than hand held. It comes with a plunge base etc so can be easily fixed to a table insert. The question I have is not power related but more so about how to use a battery powered device with no means of fitting a bump stop OFF button.
In my opinion, I wouldn't worry about it.
 

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There is no way to fit a safety switch to a battery powered tool without stripping the tool down and running wires from the switch terminals to the new switch.
Truly, youre making hard work for yourself.
 

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I think the only way I would try it is to mount it fairly close to the edge of an open bottomed table so that it’s easy to get to. I would also only mount it in a benchtop table so that it’s up higher and easier to see and reach.
 

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I want it for light work only but prefer the steady and secure option of being able to use a table rather than hand held. It comes with a plunge base etc so can be easily fixed to a table insert. The question I have is not power related but more so about how to use a battery powered device with no means of fitting a bump stop OFF button.
How would you quantify "light work only"? Do you want it for being extremely portable? I think I'm missing something here.
 

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How would you quantify "light work only"? Do you want it for being extremely portable? I think I'm missing something here.
little jewelry boxes and smaller...
dainty stuff...
 

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How would you quantify "light work only"? Do you want it for being extremely portable? I think I'm missing something here.
when the short run time shows up...
a plan ''B'' will be found like a Bosch Colt...
 

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As long as there are mounting holes, this would work. However, this probably would not be an optimal setup. First, routers in a table tend to run for longer periods of time vs being used handheld. This could create a much larger drain on the battery, possibly requiring frequent charges and/or needing to purchase additional batteries. Second, I have several router tables, from very basic ones to the very elaborate one I use today. ALL of them had a paddle to quickly turn the router off so that it could be easily and quickly turned off. This is a significant safety feature, and I would not want to use a router table without one.

I know you already purchased the router, but I have some food for thought for future tool purchases when it comes to corded or battery powered. The only battery tools I use regularly are my drills, everything else plugs in. With all the wireless technology today (note, I work in the I.T. field, and definitely a proponent of using technology) it is easy to equate this to our tool purchases as well. However, I think there are some things to consider first. First, ask yourself, why do you need the portability of a battery powered tool. If the tool never leaves your shop, you may be better off making sure you have conveniently placed power outlets. If you frequently use the tool that is going to be in a place that has limited or no power available, then battery powered is good choice. Other things to consider, battery powered tools tend to be more expensive (sometimes as much as 50% more) than the corded version. Also, longevity is an issue. A few years ago I changed out all my drills. The drills themselves function fine, but I could no longer get replacement batteries for them. The battery technology is something that will continue to change as improvements are made. This is great for digital technology. However, for tools this may mean form factors need to change which means the batteries you have today may not be available 10-15 years from now. While 10-15 years seems like a long time, keep in mind many of us have power tools that are well over 20 years old that work just as well as they were new.
 

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I have some 40 year old corded still going strong. I agree with you Mike. Except for drill/drivers all shop tools should have a cord.
 
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You da Man, Charles! :)
Coudn't agree with you more. I'm sure some S.O.B that bought my oldest (corded!) power tools from a fence, after they were stolen from me, is still using them. :(
 
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