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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The sides of a beehive super box have a sort of tapered rabbet cut in them making it easy to pick it up. See picture. How is this produced?
 

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Hello? Would you please fill out rour profile, Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
A dish cutter or round nose should work.
Is there a special way to use a dish cutter or round nose bit to get the profile? Perhaps the picture isn't clear. Here is my attempt to draw it.

I don't know what happened to my personal profile. I didn't erase it. Anyhow, I put it up again
 

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Hand pocket hole with the cove Vertical bit

Vertical Raised Panel Router Bit
#1703 Cove 1-5/8" 1/2" $25.00!
MLCS Raised Panel Carbide Tipped Router Bits 2

To put into to place,chuck up the bit in the router table,setup two stop blocks,push the stock into the bit,make a pass or two it's taking a ton of stock out.. :)
You may need to use the
MLCS Router Collet Extension
http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/router_collet.htmlMLCS Router Collet Extension

to get it deeper off the edge of the board :)
But it should be easy and quick job ..
You can also just glue on a top edge to the board after the bit has done the job if you don't want to use the Collet Extension,,some dowels or some screws will hold the top edge in place..:)



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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hand pocket hole with the cove Vertical bit

Vertical Raised Panel Router Bit
#1703 Cove 1-5/8" 1/2" $25.00!
MLCS Raised Panel Carbide Tipped Router Bits 2

To put into to place,chuck up the bit in the router table,setup two stop blocks,push the stock into the bit,make a pass or two it's taking a ton of stock out.. :)
You may need to use the
MLCS Router Collet Extension
http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/router_collet.htmlMLCS Router Collet Extension

to get it deeper off the edge of the board :)
But it should be easy and quick job ..
You can also just glue on a top edge to the board after the bit has done the job if you don't want to use the Collet Extension,,some dowels or some screws will hold the top edge in place..:)



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My problem is that the profile is not cut into the edge of the board but in the center to be used as a recessed handle. Gluing bits on the board is undesirabe as the board is exposed to the weather (it's the side of a beehive) and since the hive could weigh 100 lbs, the handle has to be strong and secure. One hundred pounds of honey and angry bees all over your shoes could ruin your whole day!
 

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Hi

Well you can use your dado blade set in a RAS,, clamp the board down to the top set a angle on the saw and then drop the blades into the side just anywhere you want it to be..

I would say you can also use your table saw but you need to clamp the board in place and then just raise the blade set up, don't try and just drop it on the blades..:( you may need to use you power hand saw to get the sharp edge on the pocket hole edge or move the angle back to zero b/4 you un clamp it from the table..but not to deep or you will take out the pocket hole angle..:)

That's why I say to use a RAW it will let you just swing the blade out in place easy and you can see what you are doing...

Don't forget they do make 6" dado sets :)

I have a router setup on my RAS for the hard jobs like this one..


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My problem is that the profile is not cut into the edge of the board but in the center to be used as a recessed handle. Gluing bits on the board is undesirabe as the board is exposed to the weather (it's the side of a beehive) and since the hive could weigh 100 lbs, the handle has to be strong and secure. One hundred pounds of honey and angry bees all over your shoes could ruin your whole day!
 

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Welcome Bill! I can see that you have your name and state, I am sorry, if it sounded that i didn't want to respond, but that isn't true. I was in the middle of posting, and had to leave. Glad that you are here, and i hope you are enjoying the forums. Howard,
 

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The sides of a beehive super box have a sort of tapered rabbet cut in them making it easy to pick it up. See picture. How is this produced?
Hi Bill, As a beekeeper who makes 1000's of supers, you would have trouble cutting the handle with a router. Try using Dado's on your bench saw. Clamp two stops to the fence. Using the front stop lower the super end onto the dado and push to the other stop. While this gives a "square" edge top and bottom it makes for an easy handle but won't turn any water which may lodge in the cavity. A 30mm X 130mm dado makes a comfortable handle
 

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Hi Bill.
I did mine same as Murray, but used my radical arm saw. I like seeing what is going on. I tried a few with the saw set at 10 degrees, but found it wasn't worth the effort. Never had a frame rot there.
 

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Hi Bill.
I did mine same as Murray, but used my radical arm saw. I like seeing what is going on. I tried a few with the saw set at 10 degrees, but found it wasn't worth the effort. Never had a frame rot there.
The problem with a RAS is shavings in the
eye and the saw gets in the way of the work and makes the job potentially dangerous. However to do it safely with a bench saw, have good clamps to stop the super end from kicking back. You are removing a large quantity of timber if you do it with one depth setting and START FROM THE FRONT to eliminate any kickback.
 

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Hi Bill:

I can't give you the perfect solution but if you mount your router into a set of skis and set your workpiece at an angle, this will allow you to move the bit into the workpiece and stop at any given point. This will carve out a grip similar to what you need. I would suggest you do a plunge rabbet first to establish the finger holds then, use the skis to angle into your rabbet. Make sense? Hmmmm, I'm not sure but I tried.
 

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Hand grips were cut with a router in the 1920's by making a 1" slot about 3" long but were given up for the style Bill wants because they were uncomfortable to use while carrying a full super. The commercial manufacture of super ends used a cutter head shaped as the handle groove as Bill has drawn using a cutter, mounted similar to a dado. In NZ this style has long been superceded by a long cut using standard dado's as they provide a comfortable handle, are easily gripped mechanically and cheap to make using standard tools. Complete supers, frames and all woodware for a beehive can be made using a RAS (needed only to cut to length) a bench saw and a jointer. 30 years ago I changed to a Manley style frame (to coincide with our countries change to metrics). In my opinion this was an excellent decision, as the supers are easier to handle as they are 10% lighter, the frames are truely self spacing, produce fatter combs, thereby less hand scraping during uncapping and are a breeze in auto uncappers. They are also cheaper to make as you use 8" rather than 10" timber and the endbars are parallel rather than shaped as Hoffman style are. Additionally we use only 2 wires and the combs withstand the extracting forces far better.
 

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Hi

In the states they sold pop by the wooden case and it had a handle in the sides of the pop case that worked very well for a very long time and then the alum.can took over the market ..but they still use the same pocket hole in the cardboard boxes..

It was hard to get your hand in all the way in the hole the norm because of the bottles...but one could pick up 4 or 5 at one time by using the handle hole...

I know the hole can't go all the way into the bee hive but the same type of handle would work I'm sure...
just a simple pocket hole put in with a router..

=======
 

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Hi

In the states they sold pop by the wooden case and it had a handle in the sides of the pop case that worked very well for a very long time and then the alum.can took over the market ..but they still use the same pocket hole in the cardboard boxes..

It was hard to get your hand in all the way in the hole the norm because of the bottles...but one could pick up 4 or 5 at one time by using the handle hole...

I know the hole can't go all the way into the bee hive but the same type of handle would work I'm sure...
just a simple pocket hole put in with a router..

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As I said we used this style of handle but changed in the early to mid 1900's in favour of the style Bill wants and later to a long slot dado'd into the end. No doubt for cost. The English style and early US style used a handle attached to the end. This limited the ability to stack piles of supers close together. The main point is to have a comfortable handhold as heavy weights are carried, and with mechanical handling something that is uniform and universal. Ease of manufacture and cost also play a part:yes4: When you have hold of a heavy super of honey and 1000's of angry bees chasing you it helps having a handle which works while you are running lol:dance3:
 

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As I said we used this style of handle but changed in the early to mid 1900's in favour of the style Bill wants and later to a long slot dado'd into the end. No doubt for cost. The English style and early US style used a handle attached to the end. This limited the ability to stack piles of supers close together. The main point is to have a comfortable handhold as heavy weights are carried, and with mechanical handling something that is uniform and universal. Ease of manufacture and cost also play a part:yes4: When you have hold of a heavy super of honey and 1000's of angry bees chasing you it helps having a handle which works while you are running lol:dance3:
and here I thought you bee keepers had iron skin and all kinds of smokey protection ;-)
 

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Hi Bill:

I can't give you the perfect solution but if you mount your router into a set of skis and set your workpiece at an angle, this will allow you to move the bit into the workpiece and stop at any given point. This will carve out a grip similar to what you need. I would suggest you do a plunge rabbet first to establish the finger holds then, use the skis to angle into your rabbet. Make sense? Hmmmm, I'm not sure but I tried.
Yes this would form the handgrip but would take some time to make a number of them.
 

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Yes this would form the handgrip but would take some time to make a number of them.
Setup is a PIA but once done can be repeated infinitely and in short order. I wouldn't hazard a guess but once you've done the layout and put together a few quick jigs, it should be quickly repeatable. The first one is the pain all the rest are gifts.

First, cut a rabbet where the handle is going to stop. If I remember correctly, your drawing stipulated that this was to be perpendicular to the face of the workpiece.

The rest is a freehand-skis operation.

Ok, mount your router on the skis. I'd use my long, smooth rods here. This is a moderate control project so mount your router to the middle of the skis.

Put your workpiece into a jig that sets the angle of the cut and lock it in tight. Mark out your cut area clearly. Nothing worse than not being able to see where you're supposed to cut. If you're going to do a bunch, make a jig with a shoulder that can serve to set the bit depth.

Now, position yourself on the upside of the skis. As you cut, you want the router coming toward you. This will help visibility. Do an inbound cut to your rabbet and then all of the rest can be outward carving cuts. If you're worried about being dead accurate, fit your skis on rails and lock the router to the rods for the outside cuts. Proceed to do the remainder of the cuts freehand.
 
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