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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
...since '17 I think? 馃槷
My thinking and designing process is slower than Karo Syrup in Montana in February.
Now that the table is nearing completion, l bought a 30 inch length of 3" X 3" X 3/32" angle aluminum for my router fence.
OK, that $12 purchase was a lot less than some fancy extruded name brand. It's a fence.
I of course want a split fence.
So my new purchase is two sections of anodized aluminum.

It's hardening right now.


It's two layers of 1 1/4" anodised aluminum square stock. I stuck them together one above the other with GB Weld Original, not the Quick stuff.... It's clamped together.
The 1 1/4" square tubular stock was flawlessly flat. Two layers stacked upon themselves should be an ideal split fence, About 2!1/4'"
Yes, just it's just some square stock, but being anodized, and carefully adhering two pieces of it together on the same plane (flat) will make a great split fence. It will be about n
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This is the split part I was attempting to describe. It's a bit on the thick side, but the pieces glued up perfectly true and square. Might need to fill the open ends to keep them from getting wood chips inside. I haven't cut the hole in the fence for bit clearance and dust collection yet. I'll need to cut some slots in the fence to attach the split fence parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have a light colored piece of Formica to put on the lift plate, but I think I need to enlarge the hole. It's only 1 5/8".
 

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Couple of points: First, Attach some sort of suction to the ends of the split fence. Take advantage of the opportunity to extract sawdust from right near the bit. Second, cut two, 4-inch slots in the L bracket one near the bit, the other near the end, on each side of the bit, and line up the split pieces. Then drill holes for bolts to go through the back of the split pieces, through the slots for adjusting width.

The one thing you don't have is some escape for trapped sawdust. Normally you would trim a corner off the bottom of the fence in wood. So you might use a straight piece of 1/8th aluminum below the fence trimmed slightly less than the width of the square pieces.

To remove sawdust from behind the fence, you will still need to cut an opening in the L bracket large enough for the larger bits to fit in and high enough for most bits to fit through. This might require that you reinforce the inside edges of the L bracket so it stays rigid.

None of this is hard to do, but helps explain why most shop made fances are made of wood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Funny you mentioned using those for dust extraction. I was thinking about that but haven't come up with an idea for connecting a hose to it because of the tubing diameter. It's 1 1/8"
I'll keep that in mind.
This 1/4" aluminum is for the reinforcements you mentioned. I'll use JB Weld and also drill and tap it in place using machine screws.
I'll use 1/4 20 screws to fasten the movable fence sections and add some knobs to tighten them with.
I appreciate the input.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
"The one thing you don't have is some escape for trapped sawdust. Normally you would trim a corner off the bottom of the fence in wood. So you might use a straight piece of 1/8th aluminum below the fence trimmed slightly less than the width of the square pieces."

How about a strip of Formica? The tubing has a small radius.
 

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Thinking about dust extraction from the ends. You could push some clear plastic tubing into the square tubes and fill the open areas. Collect the tubes into a 4.5 inch connector or even a box with a connector on it. I think it would be quite efficient.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
The tubes have plastic caps that I can snap back in place and drill holes for the tubing. Hardware store has flexible tubing that could work. I could just drill two holes in the dust collection "manifold" that I make for the vacuum then swing those hoses into that. It would look a bit like the scuba hoses Mike Nelson had.... back in the day. 馃槃
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
I didn't use the architectual. I like more meat.
Gaining a bit on it. I put neoprene washers behind the metal ones
Can't decide on knobs, so nuts for photo op. It opens to 2 1/4" but a 2" slot cutter is the widest thing I could imagine needing. The router is Porter Cable 690, so I'm not making cabinet door panels with it. ;D
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thinking about dust extraction from the ends. You could push some clear plastic tubing into the square tubes and fill the open areas. Collect the tubes into a 4.5 inch connector or even a box with a connector on it. I think it would be quite efficient.
Just some computation.
Applying the vac idea to the two lower sections of tubing, and using a 1" ID hose connected to each side..... that would be equal 1/2 the cubic inches or flow of my Sears shop vac hose. It's one of those "6.5 hp " wonders of the world 16 gallon shop vacs.
...anyway, those two small hoses on the fence would equate to 1/2 the flow, so that would require a smaller opening in the fence for the be rest of the dust collection...... More important for a smaller hole strength wise for the fence because it's 3/16" wall thickness. 1/4 might have been better... Oops, too late to go back.
 

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Just some computation.
Applying the vac idea to the two lower sections of tubing, and using a 1" ID hose connected to each side..... that would be equal 1/2 the cubic inches or flow of my Sears shop vac hose. It's one of those "6.5 hp " wonders of the world 16 gallon shop vacs.
...anyway, those two small hoses on the fence would equate to 1/2 the flow, so that would require a smaller opening in the fence for the be rest of the dust collection...... More important for a smaller hole strength wise for the fence because it's 3/16" wall thickness. 1/4 might have been better... Oops, too late to go back.
Don't forget to get a chip collector or dust separator in line between the tool and the shop vac. Here's a picture just in case. Without the chip collector, the shop vac filter will clog in minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Don't forget to get a chip collector or dust separator in line between the tool and the shop vac. Here's a picture just in case. Without the chip collector, the shop vac filter will clog in minutes.
I got that part under control Tom. I'm the crazy dude that made one with a turbo charger casting. I sanded a floor with a buffer recently and it worked pretty good. I brought it along just to test it out. Wood chips ought to be a piece of cake.
I might have a simple test for the router modifying an oak door trim into a vinyl floor reducer molding. I probably won't use dust collection for that.
....besides, at my speed, dust collection on the fence design might take me 6 months. 馃槃
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Here's what I came up with. Put on my face mask, sprayed wd 40 inside and out and the blade..... and went to town.
....slowly and carefully went to town.
Cut a couple of 45's in some aluminum tubing, bent them into 'L''s. These are to fit inside the split fence ends for my vac to attach to.
I cleaned everything with acetone, roughed up the seam edges then applied JB Weld and made the bends and clamped them overnight.
I made aluminum gussets or supports to strengthen the outside edges.
I got the hose ends from a dead upright vacuum. Those fit tight, but added some RTV silicone to seal the connections.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The fit of this tubing and the fence tubing was sloppy. That was a good thing. I lined a couple inches of the fence tubing with the fuzzy side of Velcro. Makes a nice seal for the 'L's to slide into.
The suction connections can be slid in aiming to the rear or straight down.
 

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