Router Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The only glue in this cabinet is in the bent lamination rails. All the othjer connections are either clamped or held in place with captured or screwed panels. Glass shelves, not yet made, will support the displayed items. The solid wood members are rift sawn red oak and the plywood back is plain sliced red oak veneer. It is intended to be wall-hung with a French cleat embedded in the rabbeted back of the case and screwed to the side members.There are too many flaws in this cabinet to offer it for sale but it is really a prototype for me to develop a number of new skills/techniques: bent laminations, mortise and tenon joints with curved rails, flat glass (actually acrylic) panels completely captured in aligned grooves ( getting the grooves aligned in the rails, stiles and especially the center mullions was fairly tricky), precision routing for No. 1 Soss invisible hinges, ebony inlays in curved and contoured edges and sliding dovetail case construction. Constructive comments are most welcome; as in watcha think?
Regis
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
WOW ..... nice job and a classy style to boot.

that will look great in you dinning room or living room where ever.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,056 Posts
Great work Regis!!! Beautiful lines! Me likey....

Any trouble with the acrylic? I've done a few job with acrylic and I've found you have GOT to be careful not to scratch it, rub it or pretty much anything it the wrong way.

A darker version of exactly what you have made with a tastefull etching on the glass/acrylic would look sharp I think....just a thought for consideration.

very well done indeed!!

b.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Bill,
The doors were assembled and disassembled quite a few times. I left the protective plastic film on the panels until the "final" assembly ( there were two more after that). In the end I used cotton gloves to handle the film-free panels.
I tend to shy away from dark oak as I think the hard /soft grain variation is muted and I really don't want a dark cabinet on the wall; personal prference. I did ask for comments and thank you for yours.
Regis
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,056 Posts
I have to admit Regis...making the effort to be extra careful handling the stuff has been my downfall! It seems whenever the project is something where it really is of no great consequence everything works out fine, but as soon as its a "gotta look good" project, ops, where did that scratch come from *L*... ahh well, such is life..

I agree with you on the grain being a 'feature' in the cabinet you've shown. I would be hesitant to put anything in front of it myself. I was thinking more along the lines of a walnut casement or one stained where the grain was not such as outstanding element of the design. Cathedrals almost have a flow of their own sometimes :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Roy,
If I were to sell this cabinet to a buyer far away the whole unit can be diassembled into a flat pack for shipment; sort of a custom furniture IKEA concept. The customer would reassemble with nothing more than a flat blade and a phillips screw driver. In this design there is no cross grain conflict in the case construction but I thought the shipability would provide an economic advantage to the mail order customer.
Besides, this type of cabinet goes through a series of build up, breakdown cycles and you dont want to have one of the latter after a solid glue-up. Thanks for your question.
Regis
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
All,
Also because the panes are completely captured, the M&T door corners cannot be glued. If a panel has to be replaced, that's why they're clamped with sex screws.
Regis
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top