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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Guys I'm not liking the quality of this 3/4" good one side plywood I'm buying here locally . Seems there's always some warping in areas and I can't see that being productive for building drawers . It was bad enough with my wall cabinets :(

I suspect your all going to say Baltic Birch . It's $89 for a 5'/5' sheet of 3/4" BB here but if you have to you have to .
I have tried building a drawer with 3/4 mdf before but I'm not sure how you guys feel about mdf .
I want to go with 3/4" because I want to segment the drawers into differant sections , so after I dado in 1/4" deep there won't be a lot of material left if I go with to thin a material . Although I could just lap some pieces and throw them in the drawers so that there size can be changed in the future?

Btw These are drawers for my garage , not a kitchen

I'm not going to get to fancy with the joints , just do rabbet joints and miter in a slot for the bottom
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Ok I wasn't aware of this but I just seen this on youtube and I think they called it a lock joint and they said it has been known to be stronger than a dove tail joint.
The video didn't explain how to do it but it looks self explanatory to me .

Ok I watched another video and it showed how to do it . I had it figured out though

 

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What kind of 3/4 wood do you have available at your local stores?

I have used white pine and regular birch plywood for shop drawers. For the kitchen, I used poplar and maple planed to 5/8 inch. I don't like the look of 1/2 inch and I didn't want 3/4 inch, so 5/8 it is.

The drawers in my workbench are simple 3/4 inch pine with 1/4 inch bottoms. Simple butt joints, glue and brad nails. They get opened and closed many times every day. Two of them are full of clamps.

Just remember that 1/4 inch plywood is not 1/4 inch. If you cut a 1/4 inch groove, the bottom will be loose.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
What kind of 3/4 wood do you have available at your local stores?

I have used white pine and regular birch plywood for shop drawers. For the kitchen, I used poplar and maple planed to 5/8 inch. I don't like the look of 1/2 inch and I didn't want 3/4 inch, so 5/8 it is.

The drawers in my workbench are simple 3/4 inch pine with 1/4 inch bottoms. Simple butt joints, glue and brad nails. They get opened and closed many times every day. Two of them are full of clamps.

Just remember that 1/4 inch plywood is not 1/4 inch. If you cut a 1/4 inch groove, the bottom will be loose.

Good luck.
Mike I started realizing they were not using plywood for drawers as I watched videos . I think HD has pine strips which are super straight . I'll see they have it in 3/4 but I am thinking it was 1/2 .
And yes I also had issues with my wall cabinets as 1/2 plywood is thinner that 1/2 when I did the dado at the rear.

I'm very interested in that lock joint after seeing it , so I think I'm going to try it
 

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The off-size plywood is easily handled by router biots made for that purpose, individually, or in a set of the 3 sizes. Alternatively, dadostacked blades with shims can make precise cuts. there is no need or excuse for loose panels in the bottom or elsewhere.
 

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I know you guys are all into wood, but consider this material for drawers. It can be cut, sanded, shaped, and glued. It is impervious to water and any non-petroleum based liquid. It can be routed and planed. It is a great material to work with!

LINK
 

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Click on the 'link', Charles.

Look at the picture below, Rick. Notice that the finger is 1/2 the thickness of the board? That means way less cutting and a stronger joint than the one shown in your picture.
I'm not sure why they went with such a skinny tenon? I can't think of any advantage over machining one side only?
The other thing is, the back (front) they (your pic) illustrate is massive! Again, no idea why?
5/8" Birch (4 x 8) is great, but I tend to use 3/4" for everything, except for when I use 1/2"... ;)
You certainly don't need A2 for shop cabinets! Find a new source for your lumber; HD wouldn't be my 1st, 2nd or 3rd choice for cabinet building material.

Hardwood Plywood Grades
 

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Pine is fine

Just regular white pine or whatever they call it these days.

My joinery might not be the norm but it works for me.
 

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Nice work, Mike...
 
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Rick, the locking rabbit joint works well not just because of the lock but the additional glue surfaces help add strength too. Half the thickness of the material is a good idea as Dan mentioned.

You can make this joint very quickly with a Router Workshop style box joint jig and a solid carbide spiral up cut bit. MLCS and Peachtree both offer individual jigs or sets to make 1/4", 3/8" and 1/2" box joints. This way you only have one set up. You also get to make box joints the easiest way possible, sliding dovetail joints, angled box joints... many uses.

The basket and two tone clock are Router Workshop samples; the single color wood clock is mine.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Guys the guys at WP say to go with 1/2 BB . I just can't see a lock joint being very strong with plywood, or is it just me?
 

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Guys the guys at WP say to go with 1/2 BB . I just can't see a lock joint being very strong with plywood, or is it just me?

Trust the glue. Butt joints do fine as long as they are not overloaded.

The miter joints with the router bit just helps keep things aligned until the glue dries and provides more surfaced area for the joint.
 
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Guys the guys at WP say to go with 1/2 BB . I just can't see a lock joint being very strong with plywood, or is it just me?
I've made all my drawers out of 1/2" plywood with lock joints and they have worked just fine. I don't have access to baltic birch so I just use the better grade of ply from the big box stores.
 

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Guys the guys at WP say to go with 1/2 BB . I just can't see a lock joint being very strong with plywood, or is it just me?
Rick, all my shop drawers (including the router table) are made with 12 mm birch ply (it's not quite BB, but close) and lock rabbet joints. It's like 50 USD for a 4x8 sheet at the local hardwood store. Super easy to cut with a 1/4" spiral or straight bit on the router table. You have to be a little careful with assembly but once glued they are really strong. 6 mm ply or similar for the bottoms except the really big drawers - then I use 12mm. Tightbond II.

I considered using 3/4" on the sides but I'm kind of a minimalist - like to see how little material I can use.
 

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Phil: absolutely.
I have been leery about the 1/2" for drawer sides, not because there's any strength issue in my mind, but I worry about the drawer slide mounting screws working loose...there's not much material to grab there.
I refuse to buy BB in 5' x 5' sheets. Won't go in my van and I'm not sticking it up on top, exposed to weather and rope friction marks. Just not going to happen. There must be some logic as to why they came up with that format(?).
 
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