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I know I could have put this in a different area but since I use a CNC I figured I would ask here.
I'm starting to make a few things that will need to be glued together. Some before milling and some after milling. Is there a "Best" wood glue to use? I'm not making cutting boards (yet!) but something similar. How long should I wait after gluing before I mill? Any thing else I need to be careful of when milling after gluing the boards?
 

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I use TB original for most things, Chad, and usually wait a couple of hours. It depends on what and how the pieces are glued and I probably wait longer than necessary. For cutting boards, and we've built about 75 so far, I use TB III and wait 3-4 hours, sometimes overnight.

David
 

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Thanks David! The stuff I'll be gluing are boards 2-3" wide 3/4" thick and will glue 3 or 4 together at a time. I planned on waiting 24 hours but didn't know if that was enough or not.
I'll pick up some TB III this weekend.
 

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Depends on which glue makes you happiest. I don't care for Titebond original, never tried Titebond III, just use Titebond II. I'm sure other wood glues would work as well, but I'm happy as is. I normally glue whatever, go on to something else, and let the glueup sit until the next day.
 
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The answer is it depends on the glue you are using. No one glue is the best for every job. I keep at least 6 different glues around. Cyanoacrylate and hot melt are good if you need a really quick bond so you can keep working. Polyurethane is good for waterproof but joints have to be tight, the foam has no strength. Fiberglass resin is also waterproof and makes an excellent wood glue and it dries fairly quickly especially if you add a little extra catalyst and it will fill gaps. Titebond 3 is almost waterproof but it leaves a brown glue line which really shows on light colored woods. Most glues have some level of water resistance and I prefer using something like Weldbond which dries clear. I always have a bottle of Titebond Melamine glue around for gluing particle board and mdf. And I also always have a bottle of Lee Valley fish glue around too. It's stays water soluble and there are a lot of jobs I use it on.
 

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like Chuck said, there is no one best glue. in our shop, Titebond II is our go to for most all glue-ups. clamp time is 1/2 hr min, and full strength in 24 hours, we keep clamped overnight. tbIII for exterior, and TB or hyde glue for more open time. all have their pro's and con's.
 

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@didalkner

David: great looking board!

I assume each of the horizontal rows was glued up prior to the entire board being put together.

Cheers
Jon
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the responses!! I guess I have a lot to learn about glue!
 

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@difalkner

David, sorry about the spelling error in the first missive which probably kept it from being delivered.
Hey, at least you didn't put a 'u' in Falkner! :grin:

Yes, the rows were first glued up individually and then cut to the desired height (thickness) of the cutting board.

015 - Glued strips.JPG

016 - Glued strips cut to board height.JPG

David
 

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I typically glue cutting board pieces all at once. TB III has enough open time to do this if you're organized in your glue up.
David
Organization is the key!! Do a dry run first and have enough clamps and paper towels close by and make sure your glue bottle is full. I use TB-2 and clamp for 45 minutes, one hour if it's going on the lathe. Joe.
 

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I use Titebond III mostly for general woodworking. Titebond 1 (Red) sets more pliable and tends not to break under stress and use it for segmented bowls. Titebond II (Blue) is more brittle than I but depending on what the piece is going to do. The Titebond III has a longer open time and gives complicated or hard projects more time to get assembled and squared. If required for ultimate strength I use 2 part epoxy. If you use epoxy stay away from 5 minute types because the bond is not very strong. CA glue works but is expensive if you use very much of it at once. I use CA on pen tubes and have good success.

Like others said above it is about what you are gluing and what it will be used for. Furniture Titebond III, Boat parts Exoxy and pens and things that need a quick set time CA.

For wood almost all PVA glue is stronger than the wood itself.
 
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