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Hello,

Can anybody advise what is the best band saw for a newbie? I want to start new project so I need the advise.
If I want to learn from online which is the best website for me. Thanks
 

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what kind/type of saw N/A???
 

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Some more info would help!!
1st Where are you?? In the states? European Union? Oz?
2nd What type of "project"? Bandsaw boxes? Furniture? Trinkets? What?
3rd What type of wood are you planning on using?
4th What's the budget?
5th In what environment are you going to use the saw? Garage? Basement? Apartment?
6th Will noise be a factor?

As I said----MORE INFO !!!!
BTW welcome to the forum.
smitty
 

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Welcome to the Forum...this is the best site for learning from others simply by asking questions.

Bandsaws are mostly selected depending on the projects desired. Smaller bandsaws, 9"/10"/12", with smaller blades are generally for smaller projects like boxes, etc...

Bigger bandsaws are used for more advanced projects and preparing wood...resawing, etc.

Youtube has many videos on how bandsaws are used and the types of projects that can be delivered...that may help you select the size.

This thread by @TwoSkies57 https://www.routerforums.com/tool-reviews/78834-grizzly-go513x2-bandsaw.html describes his research based on his needs. There are many other threads where members describe their experiences with their saws.

Generally, if you will be using larger pieces of wood for your project a 14" will be better.

Best advice is to buy the best bandsaw your budget will allow...

Good luck...
 

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Welcome to the forum NA.
No expert ,but I have seen senior members here highly recommending Laguna. I was going to buy a General International bandsaw , but after researching Laguna, I think it’s a far better product .

As others mentioned, a little more detail of your requirements may help
 

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No matter what you plan on doing get the best saw that you can afford. The two contenders are Laguna and Rikon. For me I have gone with Rikon. Seeing the two side by side the Rikon just looks like a better saw. The specs are almost the same and when the Rikon goes on sale you can often save hundreds. The biggest thing is the warranty. Laguna has a two year warranty and is picky with it. Here is what they say " We require that the defective item/part be returned to Laguna Tools with the complaint. Any machines returned to Laguna Tools must be returned with packaging in the same manner in which it was received."


Rikon has a 5 year warranty and when and if you have a problem you call them up tell them what it is and they ship you out a new part. Before sending it they will talk you through the troubleshooting. I had a tech actually take a sander apart in order to walk me through installing a new bearing.


Grizzly is another choice but it's in a league of its own and not a good league.
 

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Welcome. I'm going to assume you live in the USA and talk about stuff I've used. I have two band saws, the Laguna Fourteen/12 and a 12 inch Rikon. The Laguna replaced a Delta 14 inch I had for some time. The Laguna lives in my garage and is used mainly for resawing, slicing thick wood in half or cutting thin pieces off of thick chunks. In my shop I have the 12 inch (much smaller) Rikon band saw I use all the time for minor cuts, cleaning out cuts, trimming corners, making band saw boxes. The Laguna was about $1,100 on sale, the Rikon was about $300.

Rikon makes a darn good 14 inch bandsaw for a little less than the Laguna, and I think Grizzly makes one a little cheaper than that. There are two types of band saws, the old style have a cast iron frame on the left side, and usually come with a 6 inch height limit. A couple of companies offer a 6 inch extender for a 12 inch resaw capacity, but some folks report it is a little bit flexible because of the additional joint.

The other type is far more modern and probably originated with the European style Lagunas (made in Italy). These have a steel tube on the left side and the wheels are built to connect to this very stiff frame. A light steel box surrounds the top and bottom wheel. These type saws usually have fairly effective sawdust collection ports. The Laguna uses small "Cool" blocks to guide the blade and hold it in position. You can also buy roller guides for most saws, made by Carter tools. These have roller bearings on each side of the blade, and one behind. The trick is to have these guides about a dollar bill's space between blade and roller. The rollers will burn up quickly if they touch. So even though they wear out quicker, I prefer the cool block blade guides.

My smaller Rikon has some nice features, in particular, the roller type guides for the handling the blade, which are better than the old block guides on cheap saws. You can put a half inch blade in it, down to 1/8th. I think that tiny blade is too easy to break, so I use a 3/16th blade in it. I have actually resawn some wood in the Rikon, although it is limited to about a 5-6 inch height.

I am completely spoiled by the Laguna saw. It is built to stand up to serious use, super heavy bearings on the wheels, able to resaw up to a 13 inch piece of hardwood. Runs on 110 volts but also can be run on 220 (Reconnectng wires is required). It handles up to a 3/4 inch wide blade, which is required for resawing, but nice also for ripping a fairly long piece of wood. The picture shows my Laguna with the light I mounted on it. It is a good looking machine.

My table saw is also a Laguna, and I live not far from their headquarters and show room. Went there with an engineer friend to select his saw, and he was amazed at the construction and in particular the heavy duty bearings. So I sold my old Delta, saved my money and bought the Laguna on sale at Rockler.

Generally it's a good idea to have a friend help you set up any saw. Those suckers are heavy (their weight doubles if you're older). However, Laguna has a set of 14 videos online you can use to assemble the saw single handed. I found it was very doable if you do it step by step as clearly instructed.

Speaking of instruction: Alex Snodgrass works for Carter tools and put out a demo years ago on how to set up your bandsaw. It's the bible on the topic and you will likely watch it several times, most of us have.
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I have attached a pdf about the 17 major things that helped me speed up the learning curve on woodworking. It's long, but has pictures. It may help you avoid a few expensive lessons I paid to learn. Wrong tool purchases for example. I hope you find it helpful. The big thing to me is that most folks collect their shop full of tools over a long time, not all at one.

It also has a very important section on sawdust collection. When you hang around older carpenters, you discover many have COPD and other breathing problems, not from smoking, but from inhaling the fine sawdust. Once that fine stuff gets in your lungs, it doesn't come out! So invest in and wear a dust mask. Read the section on sawdust collection. You can get by with a shop vac with something called a Dust Deputy (a cyclone dust separator attached to a bucket). The bucket catches the lions share of the sawdust so it doesn't clog the shop vac filter. Home Depot has a small dust separator that has gotten good reviews and is somewhat less than the Dust Deputy. It's in one of the pitures below.

EPA says home shops are often have the most dangerous dust levels, far worse than commercial shops. So buy and wear a dust mask (3M makes a good one with a small exhale valve). I have and always use a Rockler positive pressure mask shown in the pictures below. I keep a couple of sets of rechargable batteries on hand that will last 3-4 hours.

Hope all this is helpful. Buying tools is a bit traumatic, but this is a good place to get feedbak on choices.
 

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Hello,

Can anybody advise what is the best band saw for a newbie? I want to start new project so I need the advise.
If I want to learn from online which is the best website for me. Thanks
I'm also in the serious market for a bandsaw. Here's my advice.

You're fortunate that youtube has hours of people using bandsaws -different models, styles, setups, brands, and plenty of opinions.

Spend your time watching as much as you can. Some of those you'll see are idiots; other cans show you more than you'll learn in a lifetime of forum-hopping.

Alex Snodgrass is good; so is Paul Sellers, The Wood Whisperer, and others can teach you what they use, why they chose it, and how THEY use it.

I recently decided to purchase a table saw. I looked at everything from SawStop, Powermatic, Grizzly, and others.

But after deciding what I wanted to do and needed rather than what others told me what they wanted and needed, I went with a Bosch 4100-10 new for about $500.00 delivered.

For now, it's what I need. I made a zero-clearance insert, use 7.25 circular saw blades, updated the miter gauge, got good measuring devices, excellent Freud blades, and make clean cuts with little to no tear out.

For less than 1/4 of the cost of a SawStop, I have a table saw and set-up that suits me.

The same for bandsaws. I'm looking at Powermatics, Grizzly, Laguna, and others and am willing to pay about $2 - 2500 total for what I want. But more important, I'm buying what I need, not relying on someone's else's desires or bias.

Avoid recliner-chair woodworkers, who know statistics, can copy-and-paste charts, and offer pronouncements as if they're God's chosen BandSaw Prophet. Some haven't touched a bandsaw since Nixon was president.

Avoid the advice of those who shout, "Go big or go home." Too often their advice is wrapped around status, but have little to offer in practicality. For some who use that phrase or braggadocio, I think many have been repeatedly told that by their wives.:grin:

Take your time, buy with your head and not your heart. Forums are important, but the modern ability to actually see bandsaws in action and learn from great teachers is better. Forums serve well for specific questions about technique and ideas, but youtube gives you the education that forums cannot.

It's up to you to run your own show; don't let anyone else, including me, subvert your best interests that only you can discover.

Spend your time wisely now to save money later.

Best of luck.

Steve

PS. Look for a used bandsaw. I let people know, search Craigslist, estate sales ads in hopes of finding a great used saw. Should I not find one in the next couple of months I'm ready to buy new.

Avoid the used Ryobis, Ridgids, Craftsman, and big-box store brands unless they're gifts. Then play with them but plan on getting a better saw.

For informative bandsaw reviews on this forum look at Desert Rat Tom, and the gentleman who bought a Grizzly. They're well-written, specific, and well-reasoned for the individual's needs.
 
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What brands do you have available in Bangladesh Akash?
 

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DesertRatTom,
Great write-up and has me taking another look at the Laguna.

Have you found any drawbacks on your model? Did you consider a bigger Laguna?
Thanks,
Steve
 

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Craigslist is a good place to learn about tools. Like anything else a quality tool will sell quicker and for more money. Try what I did at one time and list say the Laguna and a Grizzly and see which one gets more responses. I'm a Rikon man and I admit I'm biased but that came after going through 4 bandsaws . A Grizzly, Delta, Rigid and another 14" Rikon. I now have the Rikon 14 326 which has the same specs as the Laquana except 3 year better warranty a much better bearing system that even a novice can adjust without any trouble at all. Combine this with the customer service and its a no brainer for me. Both are made in China so as far as that goes both are equal.
 

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Craigslist is a good place to learn about tools. Like anything else a quality tool will sell quicker and for more money. Try what I did at one time and list say the Laguna and a Grizzly and see which one gets more responses. I'm a Rikon man and I admit I'm biased but that came after going through 4 bandsaws . A Grizzly, Delta, Rigid and another 14" Rikon. I now have the Rikon 14 326 which has the same specs as the Laquana except 3 year better warranty a much better bearing system that even a novice can adjust without any trouble at all. Combine this with the customer service and its a no brainer for me. Both are made in China so as far as that goes both are equal.
What did you not like about the Grizzly band saw? Which model and when? Thanks.
 

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It may help you if I explain what my needs are in regards to a bandsaw.

Resawing -I live in a rural area with many sawmills with southern hardwoods and softwoods available. I have outside space to cover and season timber and cut woods. A riser kit is mandatory.

14" to 18" throat. Cast iron wheels and heavy trunnion. Nice sized table.

Dust collection important but not critical at this time as a shop-wide installation will come later. For now, a dedicated shop-vac with Dustopper will work fine.

Ability to do close-work such as tight curves, bandsaw boxes, and other small goods.

My shop capacity can take just about any size saw without restrictions. Concrete floor, and open garage door to asphalt driveway.

220v already installed if needed with multiple 120 v outlets. I can have an electrician install whatever is necessary.

Want mobility of saw to move around on shop floor when needed.

Interested in installing Carter Stabilizer for 1/4 inch blades, and Carter guides or cool blocks for bearings.

I'm prepared to drop up to $2500.00 for saw, mobility, and guides. Blades extra as needed.

The reason I went with the Bosch 4100-10 as a table saw was I see a bandsaw as much more important to what I want to do, therefore I'm willing to spend what I need to get what I want and can use. I anticipate my bandsaw will get 10 times the use of my table saw.

That's what I'm looking at now. As soon as my hip replacement is good to go and the doctor gives me the all clear, I'll be buying the bandsaw.

Any ideas from you experienced bandsaw workers? Thanks,

Steve
 

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What did you not like about the Grizzly band saw? Which model and when? Thanks.
I don't remember the model number but it was a 14" (I always buy 14") The saw looked great from a distance but the fit and finish was terrible. What was really bad was the cheapness in the parts like the wheels and the tires. I could never get the saw to saw in a straight line, and I'm not talking about drift. The fence was worthless and the saw was so under powered I had to cut a curf on the table saw in order to resaw hardwood. The blades that they sell are so cheap that they twist when trying to make a turn. As far as customer service goes you have more luck contacting someone at the IRS that can help you. If you're intrested in Grizzly skip the middle man and head straight to Harbor Freight. This isn't going to sit well with Grizzly owners, but I wish that I had known 40 or 50 years ago what I know now about buying and selling tools.
 

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I don't remember the model number but it was a 14" (I always buy 14") The saw looked great from a distance but the fit and finish was terrible. What was really bad was the cheapness in the parts like the wheels and the tires. I could never get the saw to saw in a straight line, and I'm not talking about drift. The fence was worthless and the saw was so under powered I had to cut a curf on the table saw in order to resaw hardwood. The blades that they sell are so cheap that they twist when trying to make a turn. As far as customer service goes you have more luck contacting someone at the IRS that can help you. If you're intrested in Grizzly skip the middle man and head straight to Harbor Freight. This isn't going to sit well with Grizzly owners, but I wish that I had known 40 or 50 years ago what I know now about buying and selling tools.
What year did you purchase the saw?

The reason I'm curious is that I'm seriously considering the Grizzly G0513X2 Bandsaw with Cast Iron Trunnion, 2 HP, 17-Inch. My research has found no serious problems, and most reviews range from 4-5 stars.

I know at one time Grizzly had problems a few years back, but I'm understanding that now the saws and service are excellent.

I bought Craftsman tools for decades; now I won't consider recent Craftsman tools.

There can be lemons in any brand, whether it's Laguna, Rikon, and Powermatic, and buying is always a potential crapshoot, but other than a few negative reviews, I've read nothing seriously wrong with the Grizzly bandsaw line.

Thanks for your response.
Steve

Thanks
 

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DesertRatTom,
Great write-up and has me taking another look at the Laguna.

Have you found any drawbacks on your model? Did you consider a bigger Laguna?
Thanks,
Steve
I didn't like the lack of a downlight, and I really didn't like the Laguna brand light for it. There are four small pre-drilled holes where I mounted a box, plus a goose neck light you saw in the picture. Mounted this in the existing holes (hate to drill holes in tools), with a small microswitch on the box cover for on/off.

I did consider their larger 18 inch model (which my engineer friend bought), but it was more than double the price and its blades far more expensive, the Laguna Resaw King for example was far more than the 14 inch version. Then I watched Laguna's owner cut a Cherry root ball with the 14 inch saw and realized the fourteen/12 was all I'd ever need, given my usage and advaning age.

The other thing that's almost a must is the 3 wheel base for the saw, however, it is tippy. The saw is top heavy (all band saws are) and making a turn on 3 wheels requires going slow and paying attention to balance. I suppose one could make a more stable base for it, but I probably won't get around to it. At my age, going slow is natural.

I particularly like the Laguna's construction. Not only are the bearings super heavy duty, so are the trunions on which the table rests. The insert trough which the blade runs, is rectangular and is easy to replace with a shop-made zero clearance one. The cool bloks wear some and are pretty costly to replace, but that is offset by how easy they are to set properly, vs. the Carter roller guides. But forget to lubricate the Carter guides and they will sieze up eventually.

Carter does make a stabilizer so the blade can twist a bit, which is handy for making BS boxes. Just an FYI worth remembering.

I chose to buy the Laguna brand blades, slightly more expensive but superbly made and properly heat treated for maximum lifespan. When I visited Laguna, I watched their automated Resaw King sharpening machine and realized just how serious Laguna's engineers are about what they produce. For example, although the Fourteen/12 is made in Taiwan, the cast iron in the table "rests" for 6 months before milling in order to reduce the chance of warping over time. That storage adds to Laguna's costs, but is a QC step worth taking.

The table itself is pretty spacious, and their dual height fence is very nice. Low for general use so you can drop the guard down very close to a 3/4 inch workpiece. Flip it and it has about a 6 inch fence for resawing. The heavy, milled cast iron wheels and the slightly crowned tires when the blade is properly adjusted pretty much eliminate drift, although the fence is easily adjusted to allow for it.

I like the blade tensioner, which is below the top wheel housing rather than above. I'm a WW II kid and not very tall, so reaching up to the top is an uncomfortable stretch for me.

They have a model that has a disk brake installed to quick stop the saw. The model I have has such heavy duty cast iron wheels that it takes a little while to run down to a full stop-I don't find this to be a problem, but it's nice to have a choice. You pay more for the brake, of course.

Laguna's Leeson motor is American made and runs on either 110 or 220. You can quickly rewire for the 220, which also increases horse power. I have never had a problem calling Laguna for help or an answer. Their customer service is excellent.

All the Laguna tools I saw have an elegant simplicity about them. The engineers thought out every element so they haven't had to tack on anything to make up for something overlooked. Most band saws are good this way because they nearly all use the same design, but Laguna is in a league of their own by my reckoning.

I looked at and fondled Rikon, Jet and Grizly saws as well and would probably be happy with any of them, so I have nothing bad to say about them, they just didn't feel right to me, and that subjective element is present in all my tool purchases. I also didn't like the fit an finish of the Griz in particular.

I am a fuss budget about sawdust collection. The Laguna has its 4 inch DC port just below the lower guides, and depending on the power of your DC unit, it is very effective. A tiny bit inevitably gets by the port but is contained in the lower wheel housing for the occasional clean out. If you don't attach a DC, you will get a lot more sawdust leaking from below the table. The Fourteen/12 has a built in small brush that sweeps the blade, located in the DC port's chamber.

If you look I think you'll find that Laguna has a special table setup for resawing logs. I don't have hardwood logs available where I live, so I didn't get one. If I lived near a source, I'd love to resaw logs.

Finally, most brands of tools go on sale from time to time, and 10 percent off will just about pay for the rolling base.

Lots of opinions on the Forum and I certainly am expressing one, so I hope you'll let us know what you choose in the end.
 

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ws are)

Carter does make a special single guide that is designed to let the blade twist a bit, which is handy for making BS boxes. Just an FYI worth remembering.

Lots of opinions on the Forum and I certainly am expressing one, so I hope you'll let us know what you choose in the end.

Finally, most brands of tools go on sale from time to time, and 10 percent off will just about pay for the rolling base.
Thanks for the thorough response. Well-written as are all your comments.

The Carter Stabilizer is the single guide for 1/4' blades. It appears to be superb for close-work. It's on my list to get.

You mentioned the cool blocks guides which seem work well. I have also considered the Carter Guides as they seem to outperform standard issue bearings. As the bearings are critical, I have no problem replacing the standard issue guides immediately.

As I live in an area where sawmills abound and southern hardwoods in a wide variety are available, I want to be able to process good-sized chunks. That's why I'm considering a larger than 14" throat.

Thanks again, and feel free to offer me your studied advice anytime. I welcome it.

Steve
 

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Steve one thing I would caution you about is trying to turn a bandsaw into a sawmill. They will cut logs into lumber but not without work. If you try to cut a long log into a board be prepared and have a very long infeed and outfeed table as well as a means of keeping the log from turning. One twist and you can easily ruin your $100 dollar blade. As far as when I bought the Grizzly I can't recall the exact year but it was in the mid 90's. I gave them a chance on something else about 5 years ago and soon regretted my decision.I see that the Grizzly G0513X2 sells for $1380 on Amazon while the Rikon 18" sells for $1580. If you really want a saw look at the Rikon 10-347 with a 4 hp motor. Remember that the Rikon has a 5 year warranty and will have better resale value. Here is a review by a not so happy Grizzly owner which reinforces my opinion of them.

https://grizzly-industrial.pissedconsumer.com/dont-buy-grizzly-tools-20120701328627.html
 

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Steve one thing I would caution you about is trying to turn a bandsaw into a sawmill. They will cut logs into lumber but not without work. [/url]
Thanks for your answer. I'm talking about using small cutoffs from lumber yards 6-10 inches diameter and no more than a couple of feet long at most. What you might find after a storm brings down trees and the electric company has cut and removed the big stuff.

And that won't be my regular use; just want that capability as well as resawing old lumber found in barns and such. I know to check for nails and have a device for seeking metal in wood.

I'll admit to knowing less about Rikon saws so I'll check them out.

I have 220 50amp in my shop for welder use so a 220 3-4 horsepower motor won't be a problem. I'm already working on a 220 20-foot extension cord to make the saw useable anywhere in the shop.

Thanks for the advice.

Steve
 
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