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What are your standard size materials ? Examples 1X4 x 8 first 2 numbers are inches last is feet. Lengths 8,12,14 and 16 feet Widths increase by 2 inch,

up to 12. Thickness is 3/4 inch widths for planning vary from 1/2 to 3/4 inches. Then you have the 2x stock.
 

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Standard size of materials, eh? Any size I can get, then I plane it to the size I want, or glue it up. Or use it on a different project.
 
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Imperial measure still calls board sizes as 2 x 4, 6, 8, etc which is the rough sawn dimension as it would have been years ago on early mills. Our code is now in metric according to Canadian law and the actual size is listed in metric, such as 38mm x 89mm for a 2 x 4. I`ve seen sheets of things like melamine listed as 1220 by 2440mm instead of 4 by 8 so it`s probably a matter of time before the Imperial size stops being referred to. The US exports in things like sheet goods is already metric because they have to do that if they want to sell in world markets.
 
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So tell me again why is metric better than imperial? They were able to land a man on the moon using imperial so to me that means it's good enough for the everyday Joe. Just like a rose by any other name is still a rose, an inch by any other name is still an inch. I can't imagine telling someone to go cut me a 2x4 4 feet 2 and a half inches long.
 

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So tell me again why is metric better than imperial? They were able to land a man on the moon using imperial so to me that means it's good enough for the everyday Joe. Just like a rose by any other name is still a rose, an inch by any other name is still an inch. I can't imagine telling someone to go cut me a 2x4 4 feet 2 and a half inches long.
Actually not quite right. All of the Apollo Program blueprints had both Imperial and Metric dimensions on them. However, most of the pieces were made to common imperial dimensions. It was transition time and some vendors were working in Metric and some (most) were working in Imperial. Fortunately for me, the electrical work required very little of either dimensional measurements. Volts, Amps, and Ohms remained the same.

BTDT

Charley
 

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What are your standard size materials ? Examples 1X4 x 8 first 2 numbers are inches last is feet. Lengths 8,12,14 and 16 feet Widths increase by 2 inch,

up to 12. Thickness is 3/4 inch widths for planning vary from 1/2 to 3/4 inches. Then you have the 2x stock.
Gary, 1"x 4" x 8' = 25 x 100 x 2400 mm*

1/2"=12.5mm, 3/4"=19mm, 1"=25mm and 2"=50mm

*2400mm=2.4meters

I hope this helps.
 

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I spent 60 years working in imperial measurements.
I moved to a metric country, and after 10 years here have almost completely converted, even in my mind.
I now have 4 metric tape measures and only 1 very old one showing imperial
I can now guesstimate metric sizes up to a foot much easier than before.
But I'm 6ft 2" and I dont think I will ever consider myself to be 1.879 metres.

however, working with metric measures is amazingly simple compared to numbers like 3/64ths and I am happy to stay metric.
 

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So tell me again why is metric better than imperial? They were able to land a man on the moon using imperial so to me that means it's good enough for the everyday Joe. Just like a rose by any other name is still a rose, an inch by any other name is still an inch. I can't imagine telling someone to go cut me a 2x4 4 feet 2 and a half inches long.
Not true. NASA switched to metric way, way back. They found it was less prone to make math errors since everything is a multiple of 10. There was an official date when they announced it but insiders said that it was actually years earlier. When I studied physics at the University of Alabama between 68 and 71 everything was taught in metric. The engineering students were still using Imperial units I was told.

By the way, the inch was set to 25.4mm in length officially somewhere around 1939. When Britain went to war with Germany the US helped by making parts for .303 rifles but there was just enough differences between their inch and the US inch that if the parts were at maximum out of tolerance limits in opposite directions the parts wouldn`t work. So they got together and decided to standardize the lengths at 25.4mm. You`ve been working with a metric inch all your life Art.

And that highlights another issue with Imperial measure, namely there isn`t just one of them. For example, the British and Canadian gallons were 20% larger than the US one with 160 ounces vs. 128 (4.55 L vs. 3.79 L). Both were 4 pints but 40 vs. 32 ounces each.

Metric is the same everywhere in the universe since it`s based on a few physical constants such as the length of a specific wavelength of light and the mass of a liter of water which is also equal to 1000 cubic centimeters in volume. The US standards are kept in an underground vault in Washington and they`ve had to convert to metric equivalents anyway as they found out that those standards have been losing mass over the decades so aren`t reliable anymore.
 

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In my shop, neither are used. If it fits, nail it. Well, that might be a slight bit of over simplification. However, I do try to avoid any measuring device with numbers. But then, I don't build space craft or even pianos.
 
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Search for Gimli glider while you`re at it. That`s why I only use tape measures with one or the other but not both. Metric will completely replace Imperial. It`s just a matter of time.
 
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I grew up using Imperial inch measurements. Then in drafting classes, we also did some drawings in metric.

Then I worked for 15 years in land and construction survey where we used decimal feet for measurement. I got where I used decimal feet for projects like fences and decks and home repairs and still do for outside projects.

I was a partner in a furniture business for 8 years and used Imperial inches to build and repair furniture.

Went to work building one of a kind custom aircraft cabinetry where we used decimal inches and that is what I use in my shop for projects now. My triangles and scales or rulers are 16r scale which is hundredths and fiftieths on one side and 32nds and 64ths on the other side. Also works out great for CNC design software. I still use decimal feet for outside projects.
 

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I grew up using Imperial inch measurements. Then in drafting classes, we also did some drawings in metric.

Then I worked for 15 years in land and construction survey where we used decimal feet for measurement. I got where I used decimal feet for projects like fences and decks and home repairs and still do for outside projects.

I was a partner in a furniture business for 8 years and used Imperial inches to build and repair furniture.

Went to work building one of a kind custom aircraft cabinetry where we used decimal inches and that is what I use in my shop for projects now. My triangles and scales or rulers are 16r scale which is hundredths and fiftieths on one side and 32nds and 64ths on the other side. Also works out great for CNC design software. I still use decimal feet for outside projects.
It`s easy because it`s in units of ten, same as metric.
 

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here we go again...
or is this a continuation???
 

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Certain Industries are still using the Imperial system and the 2 that I am quite familiar with are steel and lumber. I sold steel for more than 35 years and although some imports are in Metric, most domestic mills use Imperial. I now sell and all log handling equipment to sawmills, paper mills panel mills, Biomass and wood pellets. They all use the Imperial system and the Government can't stop them for one good reason, Canadian mills sell MOSTLY to US customers. They won't keep dual inventories for products that are literally the same. So lumber is still referred to as 2 x... or 1 x ... etc...
The Metric system is easier to work with and more precise, but for some people who were educated in Imperial, the conversion of thinking is not so easy. (myself included, still more comfortable with Imperial but can use and understand Metric.) As long as the USA remains Imperial, Canada will follow to insure we keep the trade flowing !
 
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