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Well, you know what they say about the best laid plans . . .
I built the trestle lathe stand according to the design I posted earlier - incorporating suggestions from you folks. The top beam is 7" Wide X 5 1/4" Height. The legs are 7" X 3 1/4". I was certain I would never need to take it apart, so every joint is glued. Through mortise/tenons where the legs join the top rail and the feet. Even the stretchers across the legs are glued in place and backed up with lag bolts. The thing is massive and strong. It was all going so well until I put the lathe on top of it.

It's 5 inches too high. It seems that when I measured the spindle height on my lathe, I measured to the bed instead of to the surface of the stand. Anyway, now the thing is built and it needs to get 5 inches shorter. When I make a mistake like that, I've learned not to try to fix it immediately. The best solutions usually come after some gestation period in my subconscious.

The best plan I have come up with so far is to cut 5 inches out of the middle of the legs. Then I'll glue a scab on all 4 sides of each leg in such a way as to wrap the entire leg with a "cast", making the fix practically invisible.

However, recognizing the collective wisdom of the group, I'm asking if anyone has a better idea.
 

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David
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Along the lines of what Brian said I would cut the uprights at the line below. Take the bolts out, knock the 2x6's off (yes it will splinter) then cut the uprights. Get another 2x6 if those splinter badly (you can still use them for other projects later) and put it all back together.

Fwiw, an older woodworker told me years ago never to glue anything that you think you'll never need to take apart. It always has to come apart for some reason down the road.

Lathe stand.JPG

David
 

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Andy, I like your plan. But instead of making the fix permanent, make it a height adjustment. Drill a hole through the leg and put a long bolt through. Then you drill holes every 1 1/2" so you can raise the lathe up or down to suit the user or operation. You could even cut off more than the 5" to get a lower height if you so desired in the future.
Just saying,
Herb
 

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Another idea . . . .
Since the legs are 3 1/4 thick X 7" wide, I have plenty of room for several BIG dowels. I could just have a doweled butt joint just above the stretchers. Think that would work??
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I have a dumb question, What is that pipe across the front between the standards?
Herb
You know how when you go to a bar, they have a rail to prop your foot on? It's a bar rail to prop my foot on.
 

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5'' tall platform to stand on..
add another foot rest if need be...
 

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I followed you other posts about building this stand. I would consider sawing off the vertical posts in the center (height wise), then make a 5" vertical mortice and tenon and re glue. It would be plenty strong. Barn posts were often extended that way. That way would still allow you to add the drawer box as you originally planed. or you could scab 2x6s front and rear after removing 5" from the posts, which gives you a much larger gluing surface, but does increase the thickness of the posts, front to rear.
 

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Paul
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Andy, I think it would be less noticeable if you cut the legs just below the top. The seam could be invisible.
 

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Because of the bolts at the base, I'm assuming the cross pieces are removable. I'd remove them, saw at the bottom of the vertical pieces, then shorten the legs from the bottom instead of the middle. Looks like you could use a mortise with the legs as tennon, or the thick dowel method suggested. But I would most likely add a plywood trapezoid (as drawn) to each side of the legs after reattaching them. Bolt the ply in place so you can adjust the adjustment later. Forget the glue until you know it's the right height for you. That trapezoid may also give you even more stability.

If you want to add a drawer, the trapezoid's cut off top will accommodate. A trapezod of 3/4 good quality ply is going to be plenty strong and will allow you to use a large number of bolts to add ridgidity. Because the vertical legs are so wide, you'll have plenty of room for bolts. I'd iron on or glue some edging to the ply so it doesn't catch and hold sawdust. If you like the height, you can glue the setup up later if necessary.

I think cutting the leg in the middle will weaken the structure unnecessarily, and the triangles (with a little finishing and edging) will look like you planned it that way. Here's the shape I'm thinking about with possible bolt placement.
 

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These things happen and I like your stand. Lathes vibrate and need to be solid so you may well have to weight it down too, I would not cut it in the middle, I would leave the base alone and cut the posts 5inches from the top and refit the top beam to the cut post ends, you will have to get the old post ends out of the beam, this is the price you have to pay for not getting the dimensions correct, we all learn by making mistakes. N
 
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