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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently disabled by my heart. So I now have the time to do some of the I have wanted to do with woodworking. All I lack now is the knowledge, the stamina, and the money but none of these things will hold me back. I just take frequent breaks and ask a lot of questions and make do with what I have.
Right now I want to join 2x12's with a mortise and tenon joint for a raised garden bed but I have no idea what size to make them. Also in front I am useing a 2x4 to join with the 2x12 sides.
So my first question would what size to make the cuts and any suggestions on how best to do it. the bed will be 16ft by 4 foot
 

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Hi Bill

Many ways to do what you want.

This is what I would do,because of the size and the mass of the stock I would use a DaDo saw blade and set it for 1/2" wide cut (just under for plywood stock) and 3/4" deep run the stock on the saw table , do this to all the stock, then cut some 1/2" x 1 7/16 stock for splines.(plywood )
If you have a pocket jig put in some pockets to hold it,if not use some T-Bond glue and a clamp or two.
Note***most T & G sets will only cut 7/16" deep and because it's 1 3/8 " wide stock you will run into a error because most T & G sets will only cut 3/4" wide (max) stock.
That's to say you will need to run in on the saw table to remove the part that was not milled by the T & G bits.

Just one more way.
You can also use a rabbit bit and 1/2" bit to make the T&G ,but that's going to make tons of saw dust.
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Bill, just saw this,(raised garden bed) it sounds like you may have one in place and you just want to make it a bit higher.
If that's the case the plunge router is the way to go,with a router fence and the rabbit bit and 1/2" carb.bit.
You don't need to use the rabbit bit ,if you don't want to ,you can do it all with the 1/2" bit.
Put in the 1/2" slot (1/2" deep) on the one that's now in place,then clamp the new stock up and run the bit on both sides of the plank.
Note***don't go over 1/2" deep on the slot,you may have nails in the old one that you don't want to run into with the router bit,1/2 deep should be safe because most don't drive nails in that close to the end of the stock.

Hope this helps

Have a good one, and take it slow and easy.

Bj :)
 

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Welcome Bill. I have an alternative suggestion for you. Instead of the mortise and tenon joint consider using a box or finger joint. Once assembled you would drill a hole down through the fingers and insert a carriage bolt to lock them together. This type of joint is very strong and was used by one company that made waterbeds for a fail-safe joint. This has the added virtue of being easy to disassemble should one or more sides need repair or refinishing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
bobj3 said:
Hi Bill

Many ways to do what you want.

This is what I would do,because of the size and the mass of the stock I would use a DaDo saw blade and set it for 1/2" wide cut (just under for plywood stock) and 3/4" deep run the stock on the saw table , do this to all the stock, then cut some 1/2" x 1 7/16 stock for splines.(plywood )
If you have a pocket jig put in some pockets to hold it,if not use some T-Bond glue and a clamp or two.
Note***most T & G sets will only cut 7/16" deep and because it's 1 3/8 " wide stock you will run into a error because most T & G sets will only cut 3/4" wide (max) stock.
That's to say you will need to run in on the saw table to remove the part that was not milled by the T & G bits.

Just one more way.
You can also use a rabbit bit and 1/2" bit to make the T&G ,but that's going to make tons of saw dust.
-------
Bill, just saw this,(raised garden bed) it sounds like you may have one in place and you just want to make it a bit higher.
If that's the case the plunge router is the way to go,with a router fence and the rabbit bit and 1/2" carb.bit.
You don't need to use the rabbit bit ,if you don't want to ,you can do it all with the 1/2" bit.
Put in the 1/2" slot (1/2" deep) on the one that's now in place,then clamp the new stock up and run the bit on both sides of the plank.
Note***don't go over 1/2" deep on the slot,you may have nails in the old one that you don't want to run into with the router bit,1/2 deep should be safe because most don't drive nails in that close to the end of the stock.

Hope this helps

Have a good one, and take it slow and easy.

Bj :)
Thank you for your reply. This is new to me I have not used a forum before and it appears that I wasn't clear in my question. I am useing a 2"x12"x16' for the back of the bed 2- 2"x12"x4' for the sides with a 2"x4"x16" as the front. I want it to look better then just nailing or screwing the ends together. I have stained and waterproofed the wood now all I need to do is join them togeather.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
aniceone2hold said:
Welcome Bill. I have an alternative suggestion for you. Instead of the mortise and tenon joint consider using a box or finger joint. Once assembled you would drill a hole down through the fingers and insert a carriage bolt to lock them together. This type of joint is very strong and was used by one company that made waterbeds for a fail-safe joint. This has the added virtue of being easy to disassemble should one or more sides need repair or refinishing.
Thanks Mike but I would have to tell you that I had not considered using a box or finger joint for I have no idea what they are but would sure be interested in finding out more about them so I could then consider them
 

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Hi Bill

You can use the WIDE dove-tail slot ( 3/4" to 1" ) wide,it will take a pass or two.
But it will lock it up without any fastners.
Dowel Pins would look nice also, 1/2" to 3/4" dia. (not cutoff flush)
Sq. dowel Pins would look nice. (hand made type)

Good luck

Bj :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
bobj3 said:
Hi Bill

You can use the WIDE dove-tail slot ( 3/4" to 1" ) wide,it will take a pass or two.
But it will lock it up without any fastners.
Dowel Pins would look nice also, 1/2" to 3/4" dia. (not cutoff flush)
Sq. dowel Pins would look nice. (hand made type)

Good luck

Bj :)
Thanks Bj Not being in possession of said bit I will have to pass but I do like the idea of useing Dowel Pins never heard of Sq. dowel pins they sound more interesting. I guess you just cut them out of any hardwood?
 

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Hi Bill

Yep, just (OAK) hardwood 3/4" sq, works the best for me,table saw them out,grab a 3/4" wide chisel and drill a 1/2" hole in the stock then take the chisel and sq. the hole out to fit the pins.(this is called a lock pin) test fit,make it tight at the bottom then just drive them in and cut them off or just let them stick out just a bit to get that old look.
Use a block of wood to drive them in.. :) they will split if you hit it off to one side without the block.
This is a old timers way to assemble larage planks (used in framing a barn,etc.)

Bj :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
bobj3 said:
Hi Bill

Yep, just (OAK) hardwood 3/4" sq, works the best for me,table saw them out,grab a 3/4" wide chisel and drill a 1/2" hole in the stock then take the chisel and sq. the hole out to fit the pins.(this is called a lock pin) test fit,make it tight at the bottom then just drive them in and cut them off or just let them stick out just a bit to get that old look.
Use a block of wood to drive them in.. :) they will split if you hit it off to one side without the block.
This is a old timers way to assemble larage planks (used in framing a barn,etc.)

Bj :)
Thank you I do believe I will be using I will be using square lock pins whenI get that far
 
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