Router Forums banner
1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone have an issue with their plunge router base sticking when lowering?
Mine kind if jitters on it's way down. It does not provude a "smooth" trip down. I hate to force it and ruin my project.

Anyone know if their is an adjustment or cleaning that can be done to smooth out the travel?

Thanks all,

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,697 Posts
How old is it? A lot of use or not much? Cleaning the posts would be the first place to start. Is there something that's worked it way into the space between the posts and the guides?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
locking cam isn't 100% releasing...
or it may be too loose and allowing the motor to ''rock'' as it moves causing it to bind...
owners manual covers the fix...
guide posts are dirty and/or dry..

clean the outside of the motor and the inside of the base w/ non chlorinated brake cleaner sprayed on a soft white (no colored rags please) cloth...
DO NOT spray the cleaner onto the motor or base...
above all DO NOT!!! I say again, DO NOT!!! use carburetor cleaner...
now polish the outside of the motor and the inside of the base w/ super hyper fine sand paper, 4/0 wool (synthetic, or stainless but not steel wool or better yet use a white non-woven abrasive pad..
coat the surfaces w/ a DRY SOLID FILM lubricant.. I'm real partial to TriFlow... DO NOT use a wet lubricant...
do the same for the posts...

VOE says WD is a mistake and all myth... it's a wet something or another that attracts all kinds of trash... does way more harm than good in the scheme of things...
I'm real partial to Triflow but most any dry lube will work well providing it's has Teflon/PFTE in it... [higher percentage by volume is more gooder]...
CRC, Tiolube, KG and DuPont each have several most excellent industrial spec DRY SOLID FILM lubricants..
Criteria - dries dry to the touch, high pressure load bearing, contains Teflon/PFTE, barrier forming, extreme temperature range, [usually -100 to +500F] isn't hygroscopic, does not collect dirt, not flammable in dry state, chemical resistant, does not contain silicone, has a long list of compatibles and is really very long lasting... or any of or all the features WD hasn't got any of....

one thing about dry solid film lubricants is that when you apply them and you think that you didn't apply enough you have probably applied too much..
very, very little goes a loooooooooooooooong way...

Just wait until you do your saw's arbor mechanism w/ dry lube.. you and your saw will never be the same... You'll treat everything that moves in the shop in short order... Please thoroughly clean whatever before lubing..
It's a great release agent too...

Dry Film Lubricants are high performance coatings made up of very fine particles of lubricating agents blended with binders and other special additives. Once cured, these lubricating agents bond to the part surface as a solid film which reduces galling, seizing and fretting and protects against corrosion. Through the combination of these properties, dry film lubricants greatly improve the wear life of coated parts.
Dry film/solid film lubricants allow for operating pressures above the load-bearing capacity of normal greases and oils. They are also not prone to collecting soil particulates than greases and oils. In some applications, the coating is self-burnishing, leading to improved, rather than decreased, performance over time. Some blends of dry film/solid film lubricants are also temperature and chemical resistant allowing for their use in harsh environments such as jet engines where exposure to aviation fuel and extreme temperatures are the norm.
This is the type of lubricant you want to use if you have a CNC.
AVOID using anything with silicone in it, because it seems to eventually get on everything including your project and you will have all kinds of finishing problems. Silicone products should be banned from the shop along w/ WD40.

WD will kill bearings in very short order.....
it dissolves the bearing's lubricant...

Bottom line - wet lubricants and saw dust don't go together!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Router travel

How old is it? A lot of use or not much? Cleaning the posts would be the first place to start. Is there something that's worked it way into the space between the posts and the guides?
Desert Rat Tom,
Thanks for the reply. Unit is about 2 years old and used twice. I want to do some lettering with stencils and need a bit smoother travel.
Not sure what I am doing with Posts and guides and don't want to screw it up. I'll try to see what I can find reviewing the parts list and clean what I can and report back.
Thanks again for the tip.

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Stick,

Appreciate the quick response.
Guess because I don't use it a lot, it is probably got some gunk in the works. I will attempt to find some TriFlow and figure out what parts are what. Will also review the owners manual.
Shoulda thought that because I kept it in the case, it wouldn't get DIRTY. Wrong......
I will follow your directions as most on this site do. You know your stuff and I appreciate your help.

Next on the list? TriFlow.

Thanks again,

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
Stick,

Appreciate the quick response.
Guess because I don't use it a lot, it is probably got some gunk in the works.

Next on the list? TriFlow.

Thanks again,

Jim
no problem...
lack of use goes a long ways to contributing to your issues...
there are other dry lubes out there that do a great job...
pick up a non-woven pad or two while yur shopping... (think green scrubby pad but get it from the sandpaper department)...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
Stick,

Believe ths is what your refering to? Found at True Value Hardware.

Jim
that's the stuff...
after you polish... don't forget to reclean...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
476 Posts
jpaskell,

I have exactly the same router brand and model. I was having the same issue as mention. I did all the things that has been mentioned. Nothing helped. I took both the plunge base and the router to a very good machinist I know. He measured and calibrated and finally decided that the plunge base was just too tight a fit. The router could not go down without binding. He said leave it with me and I will fix it. Well long story short, it worked better after I got it back from him than the day I tool it out of the box it came in. He said the biggest problem was the router itself is made out of harder material than the plunge base. right where the router goes into the slots were out of true he said. He trued the slots and polished both the router and the base. He told me to use a lot more air with it. The cleaner you can keep it, better it will work for you. saw dust has dirt in it and it will cut aluminum and other materials. Like I said, no more problems. He did recommend one other cleaner and that is Starting Fluid. People will roll their eyes at this, but we use it all the time to clean electrical connections and other electrical parts. It dries in seconds and leaves no residual. It is dry, very dry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
it is...
Frank's suggestion is next level dangerous and should not even have been mentioned...
there's no accounting what others may do besides get asphyxiated or burn down/blow up the shop ...
I'm not suggesting anyone use it but I have experience with Ether.

Starting fluid is 25% Ether apparently, I used to repair automotive gauges and the temp gauges were full of Ether, you would fill them with a syringe type thing and then put in a brass pin, then solder the pin in place. Did hundreds and never had a problem. This stuff drys instantly if you spill it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
I'm not suggesting anyone use it but I have experience with Ether.

Starting fluid is 25% Ether apparently, I used to repair automotive gauges and the temp gauges were full of Ether, you would fill them with a syringe type thing and then put in a brass pin, then solder the pin in place. Did hundreds and never had a problem. This stuff drys instantly if you spill it.
jpaskell,

People will roll their eyes at this, but we use it all the time to clean electrical connections and other electrical parts. It dries in seconds and leaves no residual. It is dry, very dry.
read these MSDS PDF's... MAKE SURE YOU READ THE 1st 2~3 PAGES...
so it dries, actually it turns into vapor that mixes w/ the air...
the risk factors is just to high to be playing around w/ it...

.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Stick,
Looking for some TriFlow. People advertise it but don't have in stock. They will ship it and have it here in two weeks. Not good.

How about Blaster with teflon? That's about all I can find that advertises dry lubricant.
Any other recommendations?

Thanks again for the help.

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Stick,
Looking for some TriFlow. People advertise it but don't have in stock. They will ship it and have it here in two weeks. Not good.

How about Blaster with teflon? That's about all I can find that advertises dry lubricant.
Any other recommendations?

Thanks again for the help.

Jim
UniMoly, Liqui Moly or Molybond, Molybdenum Disulphide grease?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
Stick,
Looking for some TriFlow. People advertise it but don't have in stock. They will ship it and have it here in two weeks. Not good.

How about Blaster with teflon? That's about all I can find that advertises dry lubricant.
Any other recommendations?

Thanks again for the help.

Jim
the big boxes and ace all carry dry lubes here...
also sporting good stores that cater to the hunters have..
TriFlow is also known as LSA (Lubricant, Small Arms).. (military surplus stores) it was originally formulated for the military for their firearms...
Aren't any of these made by CRC, Tiolube, KG or DuPont available???
As for the Blaster.. I don't see why not..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Stick,

The big box stores here sell the dry lube also. I was looking for the TriFlow and not sure if any dry lube would work out O.K.
Sounds like it will. Will pick some up at HD tomorrow when I go to pick up my white non-woven abrasive pad.

Thanks again,

Jim
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top