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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been using a Bosch 1181 router table for a couple of years now. While mostly it's ok, I am a bit fustrated on setting the fence distance to the bit. There are 2 knobs on each side and a cheesy distance gauge. It's hard to get the distance dead on with out some trial and error.

Recently, I was somewhat foiled when cutting a sliding dove tail joint using a 14 degree 1/2" bit. The side where you cut down the middle is fine, it's the other side where you take 2 cuts on each side of the "pin" which is tough. You are supposed to cut a little bit off, on each side, until it fits. This is like 1/32 or even 1/64 for a cut. That's hard to get set with this type of fence. I am tapping just a wee bit, but it's hard to do on both sides and know how far you've moved it. I was wondering if there are suggestions for a better way to go at this.

TIA,
Dirk Herr-Hoyman
 

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Welcome to the forum, I'm not an expert, we'll see what the more experienced people say.

What I'd try, the fence doesn't have to be perfectly parallel to the front of the table, when you want to make a tiny adjustment you can loosen the knob just on one side and move that end.

How far is the bit from the fence and what do you have to measure the distance accurately?
 

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I've been using a Bosch 1181 router table for a couple of years now. While mostly it's ok, I am a bit fustrated on setting the fence distance to the bit. There are 2 knobs on each side and a cheesy distance gauge. It's hard to get the distance dead on with out some trial and error.

Recently, I was somewhat foiled when cutting a sliding dove tail joint using a 14 degree 1/2" bit. The side where you cut down the middle is fine, it's the other side where you take 2 cuts on each side of the "pin" which is tough. You are supposed to cut a little bit off, on each side, until it fits. This is like 1/32 or even 1/64 for a cut. That's hard to get set with this type of fence. I am tapping just a wee bit, but it's hard to do on both sides and know how far you've moved it. I was wondering if there are suggestions for a better way to go at this.

TIA,
Dirk Herr-Hoyman
Before I changed tables/fence I would measure the distance to the front of the table from the far left and right side of the fence. If it was tight bump it back a hair and measure, make another cut until you get the distance right.
I also would mark a pencil line on the table where the fence is and use that as a reference point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Welcome to the forum, I'm not an expert, we'll see what the more experienced people say.

What I'd try, the fence doesn't have to be perfectly parallel to the front of the table, when you want to make a tiny adjustment you can loosen the knob just on one side and move that end.

How far is the bit from the fence and what do you have to measure the distance accurately?
In this case, it's about 1/4". But, there's enough length on the cut, about 1", that I do need it to be parallel.
And it's 2 cuts, which do need to be parallel for the joint to work right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Before I changed tables/fence I would measure the distance to the front of the table from the far left and right side of the fence. If it was tight bump it back a hair and measure, make another cut until you get the distance right.
I also would mark a pencil line on the table where the fence is and use that as a reference point.
The problem I'm having is doing a bump for just a hair. That's being hard to get right.
The way the fence locks in, with a long screw bolt, doesn't give consistent pressure so my
bumps move the fence different amounts. Unlike the fence on my tablesaw, which has a screw
mechanism that move very precisely.
 

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Not familiar with that table but if you could install something like a block with a very fine threaded screw you could make very fine adjustments that way. It's an accessory I have on my Woodpeckers fence but I would think you could make something similar that you could clamps onto the table to use temporarily.
398256
 

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My simple fence lets me bump either end separately. If you want to bump just a little. put a piece of masking tape near the end of the fence so you can easily see how much you're 'bumping'. If you bump only one side, the amount at the bit is around half.
 

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In Euclidean geometry 2 lines, or 2 planes, or a line and a plane can be parallel. A point and a line can't be parallel. I don't know how to explain that clearly, um, a point has a location but it doesn't have an orientation. To be parallel both of the things need to have an orientation.

For a point and a line there is one and only one line (segment) that joins the 2 and is perpendicular to the line, that is the shortest distance between the 2.

Say you have a rectangular work piece and want to route 2 dados, 1" and 3" from the same side of the piece. Set up your fence 1" from the bit and parallel to the front of the router table, cut the dado. Now set the fence 3" from the bit but at some random angle to the table, cut the dado. The dados will be parallel to each other and at the spacing you wanted.
 

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I agree Bob. The only time parallel to the table matters is when you use a miter gauge in a slot. Then you have 2 planes: the slot and the fence. Many just use a square pusher block that rides against the fence - no miter gauge (or slot) required.
 

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I have the same table. Not the best one out there but I've had it for a long time and it works. I've gone through several iterations of how to adjust the fence. The method I use depends on how far the fence has to be from the bit. For short distances I use a Wixly mini height gauge like this one Wixey WR25 3" Mini Digital Height Gauge - Saw Gauges - Amazon.com I use it to set my bit height and lay it on the table with the "feet" against the fence and gauge against the front of the bit. I can then move the fence forward or backward very precisely as long as it's in the range of the sliding gauge.

For larger distances I use a somewhat similar method but it's a little kludgier. I put a 6" metal rule across the opening in the fence. (You could also just slide the sides of the fence closed but the rule if faster). I then lay my digital caliper with the slide extended next to the bit and touching the rule and use some blue tape to hold it down. I can them move the fence and see the change on the caliper. This isn't quite as accurate as the first way since the measurement is next to the bit, not from the middle of it. However, I personally haven't had the problem since I've never had to adjust the fence a miniscule amount for a large diameter bit. As I said, a bit kludgy. And, needless to say, I always make test cuts along the way with a piece of scrap that mimics the work piece.

If you really have a need for super accurate cuts, which it sounds like you do, a micro adjuster is probably the best way to go. I haven't looked at any to see if they'd work with the 1181.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I have the same table. Not the best one out there but I've had it for a long time and it works. I've gone through several iterations of how to adjust the fence. The method I use depends on how far the fence has to be from the bit. For short distances I use a Wixly mini height gauge like this one Wixey WR25 3" Mini Digital Height Gauge - Saw Gauges - Amazon.com I use it to set my bit height and lay it on the table with the "feet" against the fence and gauge against the front of the bit. I can then move the fence forward or backward very precisely as long as it's in the range of the sliding gauge.

For larger distances I use a somewhat similar method but it's a little kludgier. I put a 6" metal rule across the opening in the fence. (You could also just slide the sides of the fence closed but the rule if faster). I then lay my digital caliper with the slide extended next to the bit and touching the rule and use some blue tape to hold it down. I can them move the fence and see the change on the caliper. This isn't quite as accurate as the first way since the measurement is next to the bit, not from the middle of it. However, I personally haven't had the problem since I've never had to adjust the fence a miniscule amount for a large diameter bit. As I said, a bit kludgy. And, needless to say, I always make test cuts along the way with a piece of scrap that mimics the work piece.

If you really have a need for super accurate cuts, which it sounds like you do, a micro adjuster is probably the best way to go. I haven't looked at any to see if they'd work with the 1181.
Using a better gauge is a good idea. Thanks for the suggestion.
 

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I've been using a Bosch 1181 router table for a couple of years now. While mostly it's ok, I am a bit fustrated on setting the fence distance to the bit. There are 2 knobs on each side and a cheesy distance gauge. It's hard to get the distance dead on with out some trial and error.

Recently, I was somewhat foiled when cutting a sliding dove tail joint using a 14 degree 1/2" bit. The side where you cut down the middle is fine, it's the other side where you take 2 cuts on each side of the "pin" which is tough. You are supposed to cut a little bit off, on each side, until it fits. This is like 1/32 or even 1/64 for a cut. That's hard to get set with this type of fence. I am tapping just a wee bit, but it's hard to do on both sides and know how far you've moved it. I was wondering if there are suggestions for a better way to go at this.

TIA,
Dirk Herr-Hoyman
Before I got my Incra router table fence, I would use a stop block and automotive feeler gauges. Pivot the fence about one end and rotate the other end.
 
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