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Colleagues: space is tight my shop and the miter saw takes up way too much room.

Has anyone recently purchased the Bosh 12" miter saw with the articulating "knuckle" arm?

Considered this purchase a few years ago, but there was some discussion about the table and/or fences not be flat.

Any help/assistance would be appreciated.

Thanks and all the best.
 

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Colleagues: space is tight my shop and the miter saw takes up way too much room.

Has anyone recently purchased the Bosh 12" miter saw with the articulating "knuckle" arm?

Considered this purchase a few years ago, but there was some discussion about the table and/or fences not be flat.

Any help/assistance would be appreciated.

Thanks and all the best.

I did several years ago but in the 10'' and have not regretted it for a moment...
your worries about the table and fence did happen w/ a run of the saw..
Bosch to the best of my knowledge was all over and rectified any issues any one had... Bosch is like that...
 
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Looked at this the other day and realized it would shave about 9 inches behind the saw. That is not a lot. It seemed very solid and had a very smooth action. Can't beat Bosch for QC. The only thing I would consider is whether I needed the extra inch of cut depth of the 12 inch since the blades are more expensive, and 12 inch blades tend to have a little more run out, or can deflect a little with side pressure. I had a 12 inch DeWalt that had the deflection problem with its blades, and with good quality blades. I think the 12 inch is really more of a heavy duty construction saw. The 10 incher is likely to suit most of us hobbyists. My opinion at least.
 

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and 12 inch blades tend to have a little more run out, or can deflect a little with side pressure. I had a 12 inch DeWalt that had the deflection problem with its blades, and with good quality blades. I think the 12 inch is really more of a heavy duty construction saw. The 10 incher is likely to suit most of us hobbyists. My opinion at least.
the 12" full kerf in Freud and Forrest that I have don't have that issue...
 
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Harry Sinclair also has one and he praised his.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Gents: thanks for information. Just might take a culture trip to the local tool suppliers and have a hands on look at the 10 and 12" saws.

Again, thanks.
 

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As I understand it, you don't have to pull it out from the wall to use it. So that 9 inches actually just seems a bit bigger than it really is to me.

I lust for the 10" version to replace my 12" Rigid single bevel mitre saw. It's a good saw for what it is but no slider gets old quick and the capacity of even the 10" Bosch kills it. But then again the 12" Bosch glide saw is only $50 more than the 10" version at the big orange store so I'll probably go that route when the time comes.
 

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the 12" full kerf in Freud and Forrest that I have don't have that issue...
I've used both in 12" and I can get some deflection in my saw if I'm not careful, lopping the cut long and then doing a cleanup is necessary for a real precise cut.

With a thin kerf blade you gotta be double careful. But my saw isn't a slider either so that certainly doesn't help matters on the force pushed back into the saw and blade. It's really noticeable when cutting laminate flooring and that stuff chews blades up badly and quickly.
 

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Deflection-- On thin-kerfs, I use blade stabilizers.

Here's some things to think about with Miter saws:
Finish Carpenter for many years... Went from a 10" Makita SCM > 10" Rigid SCM > 12" Makita SCMS > 12" Dewalt SCMS > 10" Ryobi SCMS > 10" Rigid SCMS. The 12" blades had more deflection that 10". They were also more heavy and harder on my back, so the migration back to 10" saws. The Ryobi did me well, until after almost 5 years of commercial use... setup on the jobsite to do a trimout. After the 5th cut, I released the trigger and it kept going/poof. Had to pull the plug to unhook it it. Fried. Looked at the Bosch, but bought the Rigid.. I still have that old Rigid SCM, that I keep as a backup. (And I still have the Ryobi / not torn it down to see what fried in it.)

My choice was mostly in how I am built and how I work. I look at how it's built, how much it weighs, how sturdy it is at angles, what angles I can cut, the length of a crosscut, how accurate... but a lot of my choice is how it's laid out and how it feels when being used. (The ergonomics.) A chop saw is my main go-to on a jobsite. Not saying I couldn't learn something or adapt... But when you add up the cuts, having something that works for you is a plus. The Bosch was my second choice, but it was allot more price wise. Comparative blades sized saws-- the Bosch weighed more. That and I am left-handed, but most things I'm ambidextrous... so being able to work both left-handed and right handed... I like having the controls laid out so I can do work that way.

The only thing I miss going from 10" from 12" saws is that bit more of depth of cut for cutting miters in large crown molding. like I said, it lighter and the cut quality is better. (less flex and flutter.) Blades are less expensive. sharpening is less... But like I said, when that Last saw fried, and I was looking, I re-asked myself all those same questions again, even between 10" and 12" blades.

Most people could get by with an SCM. So with all the above, when it really comes down to it... it's an investment that you shouldn't rush into. It's also a person choice kind of thing. What may be great for someone (like me) may not work as well for someone else. Try out the controls and see how it feels to you. If you have the chance to try some elses saw(s)... a real plus.

Personally, if I had the money onhand that morning and I hadn't needed to walk out the door and to continue working that day (with a saw)... maybe my choice might have been different. It is a sharp looking saw. But it just didn't feel right to me. working wise. If it had, I might have juggled things around and swung it.
 
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+1 for blade stabilizers. I've gone from a totally unacceptable cut to a perfect cut with them on the same blade.
 

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If you use blade stabilizers does it limit your cut depth? Why not just use blade stabilizers all the time? I have never use them so I have no idea. Can you use them on a table saw too?
 

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I have the 10" Glide saw and I love it. Using the vacuum with it captures most of the dust. Fast Cap is going to build a new saw hood to work with the Glide saw which should capture almost all of the dust.
 

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I have the 10" Glide saw and I love it. Using the vacuum with it captures most of the dust. Fast Cap is going to build a new saw hood to work with the Glide saw which should capture almost all of the dust.
Mike, as I look at that 10 inch model, I don't know if the mechanism saves all that much space behind the saw compared to a slide model. Maximum depth of my Bosch 10 inch slider is 43 inches front to back Your saw looks to be something like 33-35 inches. What does it actually measure from front of adjustment knob to back of saw?
 

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Tom, front of the knob to the back of the arm support measures 32". 14-1/2" behind the fence; 5-1/2" behind the feet. This 10" saw will crosscut 13". The two arms make it very accurate.
 

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Yes. Blade stabilizers can be used on 7" and greater diameter stationary circular blades. (That means they should never be used on hand-held saws.) Forrest Blades recommends using blade stabilizers with their blades.

Stabilizers are used in sets with the blade sandwiched between them. I used them on my table saws whenever I'm using a thin kerf blade. Most are between 3-1/2" to 5" diameter sets. I recommend thin kerfs on saw under 1 HP and finish work. I've cut veneered ply for cabinets with 7-1/4 thin-kerf finish blades in circular saws (without stabilizers). Miter saws are finish work, and usually have a 15 amp motor. My Panel saw is 4-1/2 HP...

I use 5-1/4" through 12" blades on my panel saw. On under 8" thin kerf blades, I don't have any problems with any flex or flutter on that saw. I do a lot of finish cuts on that saw with small diameter blades.

Depth of cut with my 10" Rigid SCMS is 3.5". It gets this by moving the motor back from the arbor and a belt drive. Older chop saws had the motors forward, so not as much. About 2" depth of cut on those older models. Lets say you have a 5" set, that is 2-1/2" from the center of the arbor. With a 10" blade, you would lose an 1" of depth (to 2.5" depth of cut.) With a 3-1/2" set you would not lose any depth of cut, but not as much support. 1-3/4 for center, 3/4" away from your depth of cut limit. With a 12" blade... You gain an 1" of cut with the blade, but it may be a problem if you are trying to cut 6-1/2" crown molding.

So a balance and some trade-offs. It's just not always a perfect world.
 

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Tom, front of the knob to the back of the arm support measures 32". 14-1/2" behind the fence; 5-1/2" behind the feet. This 10" saw will crosscut 13". The two arms make it very accurate.
Thanks Mike. Just measured the space behind the fence to the end of the sliders, which is 24 inches on my Bosch slider! That belt drive is also a wonderful feature.

I have been thinking about the 10 inch saw, but my slider is only about 2 years old and I just can't justify it now that I have worked out the shower curtain dust collection. OMG! Tool Envy!

Tom :frown:
 
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